hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 326 326 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 37 37 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 32 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 22 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 17 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 17 17 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 16 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 14 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 14 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 14 14 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for 1st or search for 1st in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 12 document sections:

1 2
that General Canby would send all the troops he could spare to cooperate with the fleet. Circumstances soon obliged General Canby to inform me that he could not despatch a sufficient number to invest both forts, and in reply I suggested that Gaines should be the first invested, engaging to have a force in the sound ready to protect the landing of the army on Dauphin Island in the rear of that fort, and I assigned Lieutenant Commander De Krafft, of the Conemaugh, to that duty. On the first instant General Granger visited me again on the Hartford. In the mean time the Tecumseh had arrived at Pensacola, and Captain Craven had informed me that he would be ready in four days for any service. We therefore fixed upon the fourth of August as the day for the landing of the troops and my entrance into the bay; but owing to delays mentioned in Captain Jenkins's communication to me, the Tecumseh was not ready. General Granger, however, to my mortification, was up to time, and the troops a
the First division of this corps, under Brigadier-General Lawler, moved from Opelousas back to New-Iberia, with a view of being where they could be moved rapidly to Brashear City, should circumstances require it. That left at Opelousas the Third division, under General McKinnis, and one brigade of the Fourth division, under General Burbridge, at Barras Landing, eight miles east of Opelousas, and east of the Bayou Teche, near its juncture with the Bayou Cutableau. On the morning of the first instant, by order of Major-General Franklin, the troops of the Third division were ordered to march and encamp at Carrion Crow Bayou, while General Burbridge, with the troops under his command, was ordered to march down the Teche and cross it, and move by way of Grand Coteau, where the road from Vermillion to Opelousas crosses Muddy Bayou, about three miles from Carrion Crow Bayou, in the direction of Opelousas, and go into camp there on the north side of the bayou. Colonel Fonda, with about fi
ng the enemy's advance about sunset. The rebels retired in confusion and disorder. About eight P. M., an assault was made from the left of the town, which was gallantly repelled by the First, Second, and Eleventh corps. On the morning of the first, we regained, after a spirited contest, a part of our line on the right, which had been yielded to sustain other points. On the second, about one P. M., the enemy opened an artillery fire of one hundred and twenty-five guns on our centre and lef admirable dispositions of Admiral Porter for running the enemy's batteries, the operations were completely successful. The army crossed the river at Bruinsburgh. April thirtieth, turned Grand Gulf, and engaged the enemy near Port Gibson on the first, and at Fourteen Mile Creek on the third of May. The enemy was defeated in both engagements, with heavy loss. General Grant now moved his forces, by rapid marches, to the north, in order to separate the garrison of Vicksburgh from the coverin
he means, therefore, (if neutral nations had not combined to aid our enemies by the sanction of an illegal prohibition on their commerce,) to secure the receipt into the treasury of coin sufficient to pay the interest on the bonds, and thus maintain the treasury notes at rates nearly equal to par in specie. So long as the interest continued to be thus paid with the reserve of coin preexisting in our country, experience sustained the expectations of those who devised the system. Thus on the first of the following December, coin had only reached a premium of about twenty per cent, although it had already become apparent that the commerce of the country was threatened with permanent suspension by reason of the conduct of neutral nations, and that the necessary result must be the exhaustion of our specie reserve. Wheat, in the beginning of the year 1862, was selling at one dollar and thirty cents per bushel, not exceeding, therefore, its average price in time of peace. The other agric
h hill on the right and near the river. After gaining its summit, and throwing forward skirmishers, we halted to take a moment's rest, when Lieutenant-Colonel Ward, walking along the line, remarked that he was proud to see the regiment get together in such good order after having fought part of two days at such intervals, and not a man hurt. Here we might note the daring courage and art as skirmishers of a number of our line-officers, shown all the way from Rockford to the Holston. On the first day, that of Lieutenant Higdon was admired by the regiment. Of to-day, that of the abovenamed lieutenant, Captain Hammer and his First Lieutenant Roff, who are not surpassed on the skirmish-line. Also that of Captain Ragsdale. I think General Sanders is well pleased with the officers and men of our regiment for to-day's work. It is said by some of the boys that the General remarked in the morning, that his dependence for the cover of this retreat was in Pennebaker's mounted infantry brig
ed. Colonel Mizener, with a brigade of cavalry, attempted to intercept the enemy, between La Fayette and Holly Springs, but they had too much start, and the attempt failed. At this date, Forrest, Lee, Chalmers, and Richardson are in North-Mississippi, and our forces are encamped at their former positions on the railroad. The failure to capture Forrest, and his whole command, was owing solely to the bridge not having been destroyed in compliance with General Hurlbut's orders. On the first instant, at ten o'clock in the forenoon, the force sent from Collierville to intercept the enemy before he could reach Holly Springs, arrived at Mount Pleasant, where it was learned that the rear-guard of the rebels had, a few hours before, passed south. Pushing ahead vigorously, our troops followed them to Hudsonville, twenty miles further. By this time it had been discovered that Chalmers had moved north from Panola, and formed a junction with Forrest, whose force was thus augmented to six t
e which joined Wood, behind breastworks, and the other he is just bringing into line as Wood's troops leave it, two regiments being on it and the others closing to it. [General Davis's testimony.] Laibolt, who had been held as a reserve for Sheridan, is now ordered to support General Davis's right. Wilder's mounted infantry is in line, but the cavalry has not yet reported. So the reserve of the army is gone and my own weak reserve, my only reliance for a second line has to be put on the first. An interval of two brigades separates Wilder from Laibolt. and a division interval separates Davis from the nearest troops on his left. Through these intervals the enemy's columns came against one small line; theirs is displayed overreaching either flank. Three to one, at best, says General Davis, and Colonel Wilder says the attack was made five lines deep. Could the result be for a moment doubted? And for what part of it is General McCook responsible? What dispositions could h
Doc. 88.-fight at Liverpool heights, on the Yazoo River. Vicksburgh, Miss., Sunday, March 13, 1864. One of the most successful expeditions ever recorded of our operations in this vicinity, was that sent out on the first of last month, commanded by Colonel James H. Coates, of the Eleventh Illinois infantry. The force consisted of the Eleventh Illinois infantry, Eighth Louisiana infantry, and First Mississippi cavalry--the two latter being colored troops. Lieutenant H. H. Dean, Adjutant of the Eleventh Illinois, kindly furnished me with the following particulars of the campaign: On the thirty-first ultimo, the expedition left Haines's Bluff, and ascended Yazoo River on transports, convoyed by three gunboats, and on the fourth arrived at Liverpool Heights, within eighteen miles of Yazoo City. At this point they found the enemy posted in a strong position on a high bluff, and he immediately opened fire on the gunboats, which were in advance, striking them several times, an
na. It is altogether probable that something in the seasons had dictated this choice to General Banks. For example, the Red River is only high enough to be navigable by the largest vessels during this month and the next, while the task of taking Mobile is one which might be undertaken at any time, though it is unaccountably strange that it was not begun in December instead of May. As is well known, the column under General Franklin crossed from New-Orleans to Brashear City about the first instant, and thence took up the line of march along the Bayou Teche, substantially the same route pursued nearly a year ago, via Opelousas to, Alexandria. The forces under General A. J. Smith, from the department of the Tennessee, comprising the brigades under Generals F. K. Smith, Thomas, and Ellet, embarked at Vicksburgh on the tenth, and proceeded down to the mouth of Red River, where they found an immense fleet of gunboats ready for the ascent. Touching the naval force, it may be well to
e Black and Washita Rivers. Report of rear-admiral D. D. Porter. flag-ship Black Hawk, Mississippi Squadron, Red River, March 6, 1864. sir: I have the honor to report that I sent an expedition up the Black and Washita Rivers on the first instant, under command of Lieutenant Commander F. M. Ramsay. The following vessels composed the expedition: Ouachita, Lieutenant Commander Byron Wilson; Fort Hindman, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant John Pierce; Osage, Acting Master Thomas Wright; Lexinndman at half-past 1 P. M. on the twenty-ninth ultimo, taking the Osage, Cricket, Ouachita, Lexington, and Conestoga with me, and proceeding up Red River, anchored at dark about fifteen miles from the mouth of Black River. At daylight on the first instant, I got under way and proceeded up Black River. At four P. M., when about fifteen miles below Trinity, we were fired into by sharp-shooters, concealed behind the levee. All the vessels immediately opened on them with shrapnel, grape, and can
1 2