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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 326 326 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 37 37 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 32 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 22 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 17 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 17 17 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 16 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 14 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 14 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 14 14 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1st or search for 1st in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Review of the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
marching to the battle-field, on the day of the 1st, reached there about 7 P. M., a little in advaned from Emmittsburg early on the morning of the 1st, to accompany Wadsworth's division on the way tlity of further pursuit on the afternoon of the 1st, owing, he says, to information subsequently ace seen to advantage. During the night of the 1st, skirmish lines were established in the interve 5th corps, left Union Mills the morning of the 1st, and marching by Hanover, reached the ground abick with the sixth corps left Manchester on the 1st, and after a march of over thirty miles, was ongive battle. At 6 P. M., on the evening of the 1st, he dispatched a joint message to Howard and Doce, held by General Lee during the night of the 1st, that the attack should be made by Longstreet aany at 5 o'clock P. M., on the afternoon of the 1st, and that Lee then declared his intention, of aty for rest since the struggle began on the first inst. We were told at that point to go into camp,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.34 (search)
tended in his book, to say anything that might reflect upon the memory or reputation of his two distinguished comrades, Generals Ewell and Early, for it would be directly in opposition to the spirit indicated in his article, where he speaks of General Longstreet, and says: It is a source of profound regret that he and his friends should have been into such unprofitable and ill tempered controversy with the friends of our immortal chieftain. He does, however, speak as follows: On the first day neither General Early nor General Ewell could possibly have been fully cognizant of the situation at the time I was ordered to halt. Then General Gordon goes on and describes the scene, and says further: It is not surprising, from the full realization of the consequences of disobedience even then, but for the fact that the order to halt was accompanied by an explanation that General Lee was several miles away, and did not wish to give battle at Gettysburg. He then goes on with t