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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 1,094 1,094 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 47 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 36 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 36 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 35 35 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 32 32 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 27 27 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 20 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War.. You can also browse the collection for 2nd or search for 2nd in all documents.

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active and enterprising. In reconnoitring their position on the railroad, he was suddenly fired upon at close quarters --the bullets passing in dangerous proximity-and having thus satisfied himself of the enemy's whereabouts, the General returned to his impromptu headquarters, namely a tree on the side of the Heidelburg road, about a mile from the town. Meanwhile we had learned the particulars of the two hard fights-A. P. Hill's on the evening of the first of July; and Longstreet's on the second, when he made that desperate flank attack on the enemy's left at Round Top. It is easy to see, now, that this assault was the turning point of the tremendous struggle. For thirty minutes the issue hung suspended in the balances, and there is some truth in the rhetorical flourish of a Northern verse writer, to the effect that the century reeled, when Longstreet paused on the brow of the hill. Had he gained possession of the Round Top, General Meade's line would have been taken in flank and
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., Facetiae of the camp: souvenirs of a C. S. Officer. (search)
it had been contaminated, growled to the lady of the house: You taught him this, madam! Ix. In June, 1863, General Lee was going to set out for Gettysburg. To mask the movement of his infantry from the Lower Rappahannock, a cavalry review was ordered, on the plains of Culpeper. That gay and gallant commander, General Fitz Lee, thereupon, sent word to General Hood to come and see the review, and bring any of his people --meaning probably his staff and headquarters. On the second day the gray masses of Hood's entire division emerged, with glittering bayonets, from the woods in the direction of the Rapidan. You invited me and my people, said Hood, shaking hands with General Fitz, and you see I have brought them! Laughter followed, and General Fitz Lee said: Well, don't let them halloo, Here's your mule! at the review. If they do we will charge you! interrupted General Wade Hampton, laughing. For all that the graybacks of Hood, who duly attende
ith this in his pocket, the Corporal went home to rest a while. I think this tremendous tramp from Winchester to Manassas, by way of Richmond, caused Corporal Bumpo to reflect. His feet were swollen, and his mind absorbed. He determined to try the cavalry. Succeeding, with difficulty, in procuring a transfer, he entered a company of the Cavalry Division under Major-General Stuart, whose dashing habits suited him; and no sooner had he done so than his habitual luck attended him. On the second day he was in a very pretty little charge near Aldie. The Corporal-now private again-got ahead of his companions, captured a good horse, and supplied himself, without cost to the Confederate States, with a light, sharp, well balanced sabre. Chancing to be in his vicinity I can testify to the gay ardour with which the ex-Corporal went after his old adversaries, no longer on foot, and even faster than at the familiar double quick. His captured horse was a good one; his sabre excellent. I