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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 1,094 1,094 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 47 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 36 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 36 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 35 35 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 32 32 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 27 27 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 20 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for 2nd or search for 2nd in all documents.

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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Meade at Gettysburg. (search)
ral Meade, without waiting to hear from Hancock, issued orders to the Fifth and Twelfth Corps to proceed to the scene of action. At 6.30 P. M. he received the first report from General Hancock, in which that officer said: We can fight here, as the ground appears not unfavorable, with good troops. General Meade at once issued orders to all his corps commanders to move to Gettysburg, broke up his headquarters at Taneytown, and proceeded himself to the field, arriving there at one A. M. of the 2d. He was occupied during the night in directing the movements of the troops, and as soon as it was daylight, he proceeded to inspect the position occupied, and to make arrangements for posting the several corps as they should arrive. By seven A. M. the Second and Fifth Corps, with the rest of the Third, had reached the ground, and soon after the whole army was in position, with the exception of the Sixth Corps, which arrived at two P. M. after a long and fatiguing march. General Sedgwick say
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The campaign in Pennsylvania. (search)
the enemy's right with the dawn of day on the second. The divisions of Major Generals Early and Ro to begin the movement at an early hour on the second. He instructed General Ewell to be prepared tion during the day, and joined about noon on the 2d. Previous to his joining I received instructions Brigade joined its division, about noon on the 2d. In this, General Longstreet clearly admits thaoint he was distant but four miles, early on the 2d. But I cannot say that he was notified, on the attack proposed to be made on the morning of the 2d, and the part his corps was to take therein. Neral Lee but anticipated his early arrival on the 2d, and based his calculations upon it. I have showear the battle-field during the afternoon of the 2d, was ordered to attack the next morning; and Gens upon our extreme left, during the night of the 2d, ordered him forward early the next morning. In decided advantage gained by Longstreet on the second, the failure of the operations of the third da
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Union cavalry at Gettysburg. (search)
burg on the 1st, and on the left of our line, on the-3d, one of his brigades, led by General Farnsworth, gallantly charged the enemy's infantry, even to his line of defenses, and protected that flank from any attack, with the assistance of General Merritt's regular brigade. General Gregg's Division, having crossed the Potomac at Edwards' Ferry, in rear of our army, passed through Frederick, and, on the afternoon of July 1st, was at Hanover Junction, and reached Gettysburg on the morning of the 2d, taking position on the right of our line. On the 3d, during that terrific fire of artillery, which preceded the gallant but unsuccessful assault of Pickett's Division on our line, it was discovered that Stuart's cavalry was moving to our right, with the evident intention of passing to the rear, to make a simultaneous attack there. What the consequence of the success of this movement would have been, the merest tyro in the art of war will understand. When opposite our right, Stuart was met
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Life in Pennsylvania. (search)
the night of the 1st. Speaking of the battle on the 2d, General Lee says, in his official report: It had not him without any orders at all. On the morning of the 2d, I went to General Lee's headquarters at daylight, an when the attack was made on the enemy's left, on the 2d, by my corps, Ewell should have been required to co-oe the co-operation of Generals Ewell and Hill, on the 2d, by vigorous assault at the moment my battle was in p Lee ordered me to attack the enemy at sunrise on the 2d. General J. A. Early has, in positive terms, indorsedny order for an attack on the enemy at sunrise on the 2d, nor can I believe any such order was issued by Generd. We continued in position until the morning of the 2d, when I received orders to take up a new line of battg reinforced General Johnson, during the night of the 2d, ordered him forward early the next morning. In obedneral Lee to attack until about eleven o'clock on the 2d; that I immediately began my dispositions for attack;
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The campaign of Gettysburg. (search)
rg, and it was ably handled throughout the campaign, and until after the battle of Gettysburg. The army had three roads to concentrate on Gettysburg, viz.: the Emmettsburg road, the Taneytown road, and the Baltimore pike, and could naturally arrive there before Lee's army, coming from Chambersburg, on a single road through Cashtown. On the night of the 1st of July, we had more troops in position than Lee, and from that time victory was assured to us. Had Lee attacked on the morning of the 2d, he would have been repulsed, as he was when he did attack. The failure of Lee to make any impression on our right, which General Meade expected on both days, the 2d and 3d of July, showed that General Lee was either too weak, or did not have his army well in hand. As to General Lee maneuvring to our left, the supposition shows the ignorance existing of our position and the nature of the country. I had two divisions of cavalry, one in rear of our position, and one on Lee's right flank. Thi
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The mistakes of Gettysburg. (search)
; sixth, when I attacked the enemy's left on the 2d, Ewell should have moved at once against his rig my troops fought an extraordinary battle on the 2d. I asserted that my thirteen thousand men virtuplain the relations of our tactical moves on the 2d, and force a confession from even their reluctan the first signs of activity in our ranks on the 2d, General Sickles became apprehensive that we weror, in referring to the hour of my battle on the 2d, says: Round Top, the key of their position, whick move by our right flank on the morning of the 2d, so as to seize the Emmettsburg road. Had we do to General Halleck just before my battle on the 2d. The dispatch reads: If not attacked, and I cane on the night of the 1st, or the morning of the 2d, the thirteen days that elapsed between our firsn was much stronger on the 3d than it was on the 2d. The troops that had fought with me the day befrsburg, reaching that point at early dawn on the 2d. I at once went to General Lee's headquarters.