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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 1,094 1,094 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 47 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 36 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 36 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 35 35 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 32 32 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 27 27 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 20 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for 2nd or search for 2nd in all documents.

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
27th of February, with two divisions of cavalry, numbering about 5,000 each. On the 1st of March he secured the bridge, which the enemy attempted to destroy, across the Middle Fork of the Shenandoah, at Mount Crawford, and entered Staunton on the 2d, the enemy having retreated on Waynesborough. Thence he pushed on to Waynesborough, where he found the enemy in force in an intrenched position, under General Early. Without stopping to make a reconnaissance, an immediate attack was made, the posd from Chickasaw, Ala. On the 1st of April Genoral Wilson encountered the enemy in force under Forrest near Ebenezer Church, drove him in confusion, captured 300 prisoners and 3 guns, and destroyed the Central bridge over the Cahawba River. On the 2d he attacked and captured the fortified city of Selma, defended by Forrest with 7,000 men and 32 guns, destroyed the arsenal, armory, naval foundry, machine-shops, vast quantities of stores, and captured 3,000 prisoners. On the 4th he captured and
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
nth of May as follows: In obedience to instructions from the major-general commanding the military division, I got my command in readiness for a forward movement on Dalt on, Ga., and was fully prepared to move on the 2d of May, as directed. Major-General Hooker, commanding Twentieth Army Corps, was directed to move from Lookout Valley, via Lee and Gordon's Mills, on East Chickamauga Creek, to Leet's farm, on the road leading from the mills to Nickajack Gap, the movement to commence on the 2d. Major-General Palmer, commanding the Fourteenth Army Corps, was to concentrate his command at Ringgold, Ga., and Major-General Howard, commanding the Fourth Army Corps, was to move from Cleveland, East Tennessee, on the 3d, and concentrate his command in the vicinity of Catoosa Springs, about three miles east of Ringgold; McCook's division of cavalry to move on Howard's left; Kilpatrick's division of cavalry was stationed at Ringgold, picketing toward Tunnel Hill, and patrolling on Palmer's
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
e at 11 p. m., which his troops handsomely repulsed. Heavy firing was heard in the direction of Dallas a little later, whereupon a strong demonstration by artillery and musketry firing was made by Stanley and Newton. May 30 and 31, skirmishing and some slight reconnaissances by ourselves and the enemy, but no material change occurred. June 1, the movement of the army to the left commenced, General McPherson and General Davis having withdrawn from the extreme right position. On the 2d the movement was continued; the Twentieth and Twenty-third Corps and part of the Fourteenth passed beyond our extreme left. June 3 and 4, nothing of consequence, excepting that I thinned and extended my lines so as to cover the ground occupied by the Twenty-third Corps, and afterward by Davis' division, of the Fourteenth Corps, relieving those troops in order to prolong our lines to the left. The result of these movements was to cause the enemy to abandon his lines on the night of June 4.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 24 (search)
g advanced, it was found the enemy had evacuated his works, which had been rendered almost impregnable against assault. The reserve regiments of the brigade were moved, in accordance with orders from Major-General Stanley, on the night of the 2d instant about one-half a mile to the left, and relieved General Kimball's brigade, of Newton's division. At early dawn on the 3d instant, the enemy being gone, the brigade was assembled and massed in an open field and awaited orders for pursuit. At 7Ohio and Twenty-third Kentucky, were detached and sent to report to General Grose, commanding Third Brigade, and were placed by him so as to protect his left flank. These regiments rejoined the brigade that night at 10 o'clock. At daylight the 2d instant I was ordered to take position on the left of General Grose's brigade, and attack the enemy in his works, but daylight disclosed the fact that the rebels had gone, and the movement was not made. We marched through Jonesborough and down the rai
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
n wounded. On Monday, May 30, the skirmishing still continued; casualties, 2 enlisted men wounded. On Tuesday, May 31, our skirmishers were still engaged, and the casualties of this regiment, 1 enlisted man wounded. On Wednesday, June 1, the position of the regiment was still unchanged. The loss on this day was 1 enlisted man killed. On Thursday, June 2, no change of position took place; casualties of the regiment, 1 enlisted man wounded. On Friday, June 3, in the same position as on the 2d; casualties of the regiment, 2 enlisted men wounded. On Saturday, June 4, moved camp at daylight to the left, the rebels having retreated during the night. On Sunday, June 5, the regiment lay quietly in camp all day. On Monday, June 6, the regiment marched at 5 a. m. a distance of about six miles to near Acworth Station. The regiment lay in camp during the 7th, 8th, and 9th. On Friday, June 10, the regiment left camp at 7 a. m., and marched four miles and encamped near Pine Knob, or Pine T
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 66 (search)
deployed as skirmishers, and this brigade, the advance of the corps, pushed forward toward the Macon railroad, which was struck about three miles south of Rough and Ready and destroyed during the night by our pioneers, under direction of Captain Galbraith. The Seventy-first Regiment Ohio Veteran Infantry arrived and was camped with the brigade. On the 1st of September this brigade acted as rear guard to the train, camping two miles north of Jonesborough. Moving through Jonesborough on the 2d, we found the enemy in force near Lovejoy's Station, and, as directed by the division commander, the brigade was formed in double column at half distance in the rear of the left of First Brigade of this division, with 200 men from the Seventy-first Regiment Ohio Veteran Infantry, under command of Colonel McConnell, deployed as skirmishers on the left of the skirmishers of the First Brigade. Advancing, we encountered the enemy's skirmishers and drove them half a mile. Finding that there was a
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 68 (search)
31st ultimo resumed the march, the regiment skirmishing until about 2 p. m., when, relieved by the Forty-first Ohio Volunteers, marched to within a mile of the Macon railroad, the Fifty-ninth Regiment Illinois Volunteers being placed on picket duty that night. On the morning of the 1st instant moved out on the Griffin road, the division acting as guard to the wagon train, crossed the Macon railroad, and bivouacked after dark about two miles north of Jonesborough. On the morning of the 2d instant moved through Jonesborough; about five miles south of there at 3 p. m., formed in double column at half distance in rear of the First Brigade of our division, which was in line of battle, with orders to deploy on its left as the enemy was developed. The lines moved forward about 600 yards, when, by direction of the brigade commander, the regiment executed a deployment in conjunction with the Seventy-first Ohio Veteran Volunteers on my right, in prolongation of the line of battle of the Fi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 104 (search)
ad for about a mile and a half, when we were halted and ordered back to our camp of the previous night. At an early hour on the 1st of September we moved in the direction of Jonesborough. On this day the memorable engagement of Jonesborough took place. As I have made that engagement the subject of a special report, I would respectfully refer to that report for an account of the day's operations, and ask that it be considered a part of this, in order that I may not be too voluminous. On the 2d we went into Jonesborough, where we remained till the afternoon of the 4th, when we leisurely fell back to a position near Atlanta, which place we have occupied since. At the commencement of the campaign we had 109 commissioned officers and 2,933 enlisted men. This number was increased during the campaign by recruits joining the different regiments to the number of at least 300. On the 15th of July the Sixty-ninth Ohio was detached from the brigade. On the 27th of August the Eleventh Mic
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 115 (search)
venty-fourth Ohio and Thirty-seventh Indiana were so disposed as to support either part of the line. The advance subsequently made by General Carlin was fiercely opposed by the enemy, and the positions gained by him from time to time were the results of many sharp conflicts. In these fights the First Wisconsin and Twentyfirst Ohio were most exposed. The First Wisconsin, especially, suffered severely, and for three days performed their arduous duties with great courage and fortitude. On the 2d General Carlin was relieved by General Baird's division, my brigade having previously taken position on the right. Other forces began to form on the left of General Baird's, thus threatening again the enemy's flank. On the night of the 4th the enemy charged my lines with considerable boldness and force, but were repulsed, no part of my line giving way. The following morning we found no enemy in our front. On the 6th General Johnson assumed command again. We now moved to the left toward Acw
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 138 (search)
redited to the division at large. The rear lines and other portions of the captured line made repeated attempts to regain their position, but were in each instance repulsed. A volunteer artillery company was improvised from my ranks, and under the charge of Sergt. John Woods, One hundred and twenty-first Ohio, the captured guns were turned upon the enemy with great effect. The sergeant and his squad deserve special mention. This success compelled the abandonment of the line, and on the 2d instant our skirmishers entered Jonesborough. At 11 o'clock the same day our forces occupied Atlanta. The campaign has lasted four months. Fully three-fourths of that time this command has been under constant fire. We participated in the engagements at Tunnel Hill, Mill Creek Gap, Resaca, Rome, Kenesaw Mountain, Marietta, Dallas, Peach Tree Creek, Atlanta, and Jonesborough. The list of our losses, herewith forwarded, will tell more plainly than words can the price our success has cost. Eac
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