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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 1,094 1,094 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 47 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 36 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 36 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 35 35 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 32 32 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 27 27 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 20 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for 2nd or search for 2nd in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. (search)
he line of fire. It was thought that the guns in the masked battery were rifled and of very heavy calibre [?]as their projectiles were thrown beyond the Richmond. At the end of the first day's bombardment the ships retired, uninjured. On the second day they took up about the same positions, but their shells failed to reach the forts, while the Commander says, the enemy's shells fell thick about us, some passing over the ships, and far beyond them. Therefore, says the Flag Officer, I deemedor the present. This indifference arose from the fact that they had no ammunition to use in the guns which they had found in the Navy Yard — but they were biding their time and would no doubt be heard from when the opportunity offered. On the second day after the arrival of the Powhatan, a flotilla, composed of steam tugs, schooners and large launches, filled with soldiers, was seen to be coming from the direction of Pensacola, and heading for the two ships lying outside of Santa Rosa Island
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 19: battle of the forts and capture of New Orleans. (search)
Acting-Master Charles Jack came out in this vessel from New York; he lost his mainmast in a gale off Cape Hatteras. but persevered until he arrived at Key West. and sailed with the flotilla to Ship Island He went through another gale, but got into port safe. He was almost always up with the rest in working up the river under sail with his one mast; and when his vessel sunk he volunteered his services on board the vessel of Lieutenant-Commander Queen, to whose division he belonged. On the second day the firing from the forts was rather severe on the masts and rigging of the first division. I wanted to remove them a little further down, but was prevented from doing so at the request of Lieutenant-Commander Smith, who seemed determined not to withdraw until something was sunk. He had one man killed in the Arletta, Acting-Master Smith, by a ten-inch shot striking between the stop of the mortar bed and the mortar, which disabled it for a time only; it was repaired in two or three hour
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 26: siege of Vicksburg. (search)
sawing or cutting away the obstructions. Colonel Wilson, an Army engineer, who directed all this kind of work, was a thoughtful, energetic man, and he conducted the operations in an intelligent manner, and though the vessels did not make very rapid headway, they did wonderfully well considering the difficulties. They all had to be carefully handled with hawsers around the bends, for the Yazoo Pass, following the example of the mother Mississippi, was as crooked as a ram's horn. On the second day, the vessels were so torn to pieces that no more harm could be done to them — they had hulls and engines left and that had to suffice. The officers and men performed a great deal of manual U. S. Naval hospital boat Red Rover passing Randolph near Fulton, Tenn. (from a sketch by Rear-Admiral Walke.) labor, but no one found fault, and their jolly songs echoed turough the woods as they worked, frightening the birds out of their quiet retreats, where they had rested undisturbed for a quar
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
r to suppress these raiders, whose zeal and persistency seemed without limit. The great Confederate armies of the West appeared to have been divided into small bodies, which could move with greater celerity. The Lexington, Cricket and Marmora were the vessels comprising Lieutenant Bache's command. On the arrival of the expedition at Des Arc, it burned a large warehouse filled with Confederate stores, which the thoughtless enemy had supposed was safe from the attack of gun-boats. On the second morning, on arriving off the mouth of Little Red River, a narrow and tortuous tributary of the White, the Cricket was sent up that stream in pursuit of two Confederate steamers, while the Lexington went twenty-five miles further up the White to Augusta. At that place Lieutenant-Commander Bache was informed that the indefatigable General Price was assembling an army at Brownsville, and that two kindred spirits, Generals Kirby Smith and Marmaduke, were with him. Lieutenant Bache immediatel
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 49: first attack on Fort Fisher.--destruction of the confederate ram Albemarle, etc. (search)
could have gotten near enough, say within two or three hundred yards, she would not only have silenced Commodore (now Rear-Admiral) William Radford. their batteries fully and entirely, but would have driven every rebel from the point. On the second day, the 25th, this ship was sent to silence some of the enemy's earth-works, which were contiguous to the place fixed upon for the disembarking of the troops, to shell the woods, and to cover their landing. The first troops landed at about 2 P.oss of life to the rebels, and would have proven a fruitless attempt. On the first day we delivered two hundred and seventeen (217) 9-inch shells, fifty-nine 59) one hundred-pound rifles, and eighty-nine (89) thirty-pound rifle shells. On the second day we delivered one hundred and three (103) 9-inch shells, twenty (20) one hundred-pound rifles, and twenty-five (25) thirty-pound rifle shells, making a total of five hundred and thirteen. Our firing was effective as well as rapid, and I hav
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
de-armor abreast the turret. We count thirty-six (36) hits this day, and everything about the deck not shot-proof was badly cut up. Two men were knocked down and stunned at the guns by the impact of a 10-inch gun-shot upon the turret. The flag was shot away twice and gallantly replaced by Quartermaster Daniel D. Stevens. Not content with solid shot, the enemy fired shells occasionally, to burst over the turret, and now and then the bullet of a sharp-shooter whistled over us. On the second and third days the fire of the enemy was comparatively feeble, and principally directed at the gun-boats, and when the larger ships came into action ceased altogether. An occasional musket-shot fell near us, and when the naval-assaulting column was driven back, many of the bullets and grape-shot fired at our gallant fellows passed over us, some few striking the ship. Second-Assistant Engineer John W. Saville received a severe wound in the left thigh from a grape-shot. At this time we also