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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 1,094 1,094 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 47 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 36 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 36 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 35 35 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 32 32 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 27 27 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 20 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for 2nd or search for 2nd in all documents.

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moved the adoption of the rules and regulations of the Democratic National Conventions of May, 1832, and May, 1835, for the government of this body; his object being the enactment of that rule which required a vote of two-thirds of the delegates to nominate a candidate. After a heated discussion, the two-thirds rule was adopted, on the second day, by 148 Yeas to 118 Nays, and the fate of Van Buren sealed. On the first ballot, he received 146 votes to 116 for all others; but he fell, on the second, to 127, and settled gradually to 104 on the eighth, when he was withdrawn--Gen. Cass, who began with 83, having run up to 114. On the next ballot, James K. Polk, of Tennessee, who had received no vote at all till the eighth ballot, and then but 44, was nominated, receiving 233 out of 266 votes. This was on the third day of the Convention, when Silas Wright, of New York, was immediately nominated for Vice-President. He peremptorily declined, and George M. Dallas, of Pennsylvania, was sele
The Whig National Convention assembled in Philadelphia, June 7th. Gen. Zachary Taylor, of Louisiana, had on the first ballot 111 votes for President to 97 for Henry Clay, 43 for General Scott, 22 for Mr. Webster, and 6 scattering. On the fourth ballot (next day), Gen. Taylor had 171 to 107 for all others, and was declared nominated. Millard Fillmore, of New York, had 115 votes for Vice-President, on the first ballot, to 109 for Abbott Lawrence, of Massachusetts, and 50 scattering. On the second ballot, Mr. Fillmore had 173, and was nominated. No resolves affirming distinctive principles were passed; repeated efforts to interpose one affirming the principle of the Wilmot Proviso being met by successful motions to lay on the table. The Buffalo or Free Soil Convention was as frank and explicit in its declaration of principles as its more powerful rivals had been ambiguous or reticent. The following are its most material averments: Resolved, That the Proviso of Jefferson, to p
ndidate were cast, for James Buchanan, 135; Pierce, 122; Douglas, 33; Cass, 5. Buchanan gained pretty steadily, and Pierce lost; so that, on the ninth ballot, the vote stood: Buchanan, 147; Pierce, 87; Douglas, 56; Cass, 7. On the sixteenth, Mr. Buchanan had 168; Mr. Douglas, 121. And, on the seventeenth, Mr. Buchanan received the whole number, 296 votes, and was nominated. On the first ballot for Vice-President, John A. Quitman, of Mississippi, received the highest vote--59; but, on the second, his name was withdrawn, and John C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky, was unanimously nominated. The Convention, in its platform, after adopting nearly all the material resolves of its two immediate predecessors, unanimously 1. Resolved, That, claiming fellowship with and desiring the cooperation of all who regard the preservation of the Union under the Constitution as the paramount issue, and repudiating all sectional parties and platforms concerning domestic Slavery, which seek to embroil
nsylvania, was chosen temporary Chairman, and George Ashmun, of Massachusetts, President. A Platform Committee of one from each State and Territory was appointed on the first day, from which Committee a report was submitted on the evening of the second, when it was immediately and unanimously adopted. That report or Platform is as follows: Resolved, That we, the delegated representatives of the Rhepublican electors of the United States, in Convention assembled, in discharge of the duty weous. In the evening, the Convention proceeded to ballot for Vice-President, when Hannibal Hamlin, of Maine, received, on the first ballot, 194 votes; Cassius M. Clay, of Kentucky, 101 1/2; and there were 1656 cast for other candidates. On the second ballot, Mr. Hamlin received 367 votes to 99 for all others, and was declared duly nominated. On motion of Mr. George D. Blakey, of Kentucky, the nomination was made unanimous. On motion of Mr. Joshua R. Giddings, of Ohio, it was Resolved,
The steamship Theodora ran out of Charleston harbor during the night of Oct. 12th, conveying James M. Mason, of Va., Confederate Envoy to Great Britain, and John Slidell, of La., likewise accredited to France. The Theodora duly reached Cardenas, Cuba; whence her official passengers repaired to Havana, and, on the 7th of November, left that port, in the British mail steamer Trent, for St. Thomas, on their way to England. The U. S. steamship San Jacinto, Capt. Wilkes, had left Havana on the 2d, and was watching for them in the Bahama Channel, 240 miles from Havana, when, at 11:40 A. M., of the 8th, he sighted the Trent; and, after a civil request to heave to had been declined by her, a shell was fired across her bow, which brought her to reason. Lieut. Fairfax, with a boat's crew, immediately boarded her in quest of the Embassadors; when Messrs. Mason and Slidell, with their Secretaries, Eustis and McFarland, were compelled to change their vessel and their destination. Their famil