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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 1,094 1,094 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 47 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 36 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 36 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 35 35 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 32 32 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 27 27 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 20 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War. You can also browse the collection for 2nd or search for 2nd in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 6 document sections:

General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 1 (search)
d give me fully both information and suggestions. Twenty-five hundred militia, called out in Frederick and the surrounding counties, were assembling at Winchester under Brigadier-Generals Carson and Meem; and, especially to increase their value, Major Whiting was directed to have a few light defensive works constructed on the most commanding positions on the northeast side of the town, and to have some very ineffective heavy guns, on ship-carriages found there, mounted in them. On the 2d, General Patterson's army, which had been strongly reenforced, again crossed the Potomac and marched toward Martinsburg, driving before it the little body of cavalry that Stuart was able to gather. Colonel Jackson directed his brigade to retire, according to the instructions he had received; and with the rear-guard, composed of three hundred and eighty men of Colonel Harper's (Fifth Virginia) regiment and a field-piece, Commanded by Captain Pendleton himself. which Stuart joined with his lit
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 6 (search)
the Confederate right. Lieutenant-General Polk's report. The fight was not renewed. On the 1st of January it was found that the position assailed and defended so bravely, the previous afternoon, had been abandoned by the Federals. On the 2d, a division of the Federal left crossed Stone's River and took possession of a hill in front of the Confederate right, that commanded the right of Lieutenant-General Polk's position. Major-General Breckenridge was directed to drive the enemy from s will give you back what was abandoned to win it. General Pemberton's call for large reenforcements was transmitted by telegraph to the War Department forthwith, and I added, They cannot be sent from here without giving up Tennessee. On the 2d Bowen was pressed back through Port Gibson, but in perfect order; and returned to his post-Grand Gulf. On the 3d, however, finding his position turned, he abandoned it, after spiking his guns and blowing up his magazine, and marched to Hankinson's
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
g one-half in front of the river to fight, and sending the other behind it, to bivouac some two miles in rear. General Pemberton received four orders from me during this campaign. The first, See page 170. dated May 1st, and repeated on the 2d, directed him to attack the Federal army with all his forces united for the purpose. The second, See page 176. dated May 13th, is that by which he professes to have been instigated to the movement which entangled him with Federal skirmishers ow, I directed Lieutenant-General Pemberton to attack the enemy with all his force, as soon as I was informed, by his dispatch of May 1st, that Major-General Bowen had been attacked by a large body of Federal troops. This order was repeated on the 2d, only to be disregarded. Advantageous opportunities to engage the Federal army were offered continually, until the investment of Vicksburg; for, until then, that army had been united but three or four of the twenty days elapsed since it began to c
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 10 (search)
imminent. They showed that the enemy was approaching our position, and repairing the railroad from Chattanooga to Ringgold. The intelligence received on each day was immediately transmitted to General Bragg. That officer suggested to me, on the 2d, that I was deceived, probably, by mere demonstrations, made for the purpose. On that day, Mercer's brigade, about fourteen hundred effective infantry, joined the army, from Savannah. It was to be replaced there by J. K. Jackson's, of the Army the campaign, Stoneman's, Garrard's, and McCook's divisions arrived-adding, probably, twelve thousand. Our scouts reported that the Fourth Corps and McCook's division of cavalry were at Cleveland, and the Army of the Ohio at Charleston, on the 2d, both on the way to Chattanooga; and that these troops and the Army of the Cumberland reached Ringgold in the afternoon of the 4th and encamped there. Our pickets (cavalry) were at the same time pressed back beyond Varnell's Station, on the Cle
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 12 (search)
department, coming from Charleston, or the Federal army, would reach Cheraw first. The latter, however, was more retarded than the Confederate troops, by the streams, then much swollen by recent heavy rains; for the course of its march crossed the larger streams, while that of the Confederates was parallel to them. Thus General Hardee crossed the Pedee, at Cheraw, on the morning of the 3d, with all the military stores he had the means of transporting-having assembled his forces there on the 2d. His rear-guard was so closely pressed by the leading Federal troops, that it had barely time to destroy the bridge after passing over it. In the march from Winnsboroa, the Fifteenth and Seventeenth Corps, which formed General Sherman's right wing, crossed the Catawba at Peay's Ferry; the left wing, consisting of the Fourteenth and Twentieth Corps, after destroying the railroad-track as far as Blackstock, crossed the river at Rocky Mount; the Seventeenth Corps crossed Lynch's Creek by Young's
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
e, February 7, 1862. To the Hon. J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of War. Sir: I had the honor to receive your letter of the 3d instant by the last mail. On the 2d instant, I sent Lieutenant-Colonel Harrison, Virginia cavalry, with a proposition to Major-General McClellan for an exchange of prisoners of war. That officer was stopppectfully, Your obedient servant, J. E. Johnston, General. Centreville, February 11, 1862. Hon. J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of War. Sir: On the morning of the 2d instant, I dispatched to Major-General G. B. McClellan a proposition for the general exchange of prisoners of war according to modern usage. He was informed that the ps division, had arrived. Not having heard from General Bowen after half-past 5 . M., on the 1st instant, I dispatched him, via Rocky Springs, on the morning of the 2d, as follows: If you are holding your position on the Bayou Pierre, and your communication is open by the Big Black to this place, continue to hold it. I am informed