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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 1,094 1,094 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 47 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 36 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 36 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 35 35 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 32 32 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 27 27 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 20 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for 2nd or search for 2nd in all documents.

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rom the church. This, Kilpatrick and Baird accomplished by the afternoon of the second. Morgan's division, in charge of the whole corps train, moved on the direct road to Buckhead Bridge, and encamped ten (10) miles from Louisville. On the second, Carlin's division joined the column from his flank movement in the direction of Sebastopol, and the corps went into camp at the crossing of the Birdsville and Waynesboro roads, about two (2) miles from the bridge. The change in the direction kinds were very abundant. From the first to the eighth of December, our line of march was down the Peninsula between the Ogeechee and Savannah Rivers, following the Louisville and Savannah Road, encamping on the first on Baker's Creek; on the second, at Buckhead Church; on the third, at Horse Creek; on the fourth, at Little Ogeechee; on the fifth, at Sylvania Cross-Roads; on the sixth, near Cowpens Creek; on the seventh, on Jack's Branch, near Springfield; and on the eighth, near Eden Cross-
The whole corps encamped about three miles south of Louisville. Between the Oconee and Ogeechee, the roads, excepting at the river and swamp crossings, were good, the country very level, and the weather, during the march, superb. Supplies of all kinds were very abundant. From the first to the eighth of December, our line of march was down the Peninsula between the Ogeechee and Savannah Rivers, following the Louisville and Savannah Road, encamping on the first on Baker's Creek; on the second, at Buckhead Church; on the third, at Horse Creek; on the fourth, at Little Ogeechee; on the fifth, at Sylvania Cross-Roads; on the sixth, near Cowpens Creek; on the seventh, on Jack's Branch, near Springfield; and on the eighth, near Eden Cross-Roads. As we approached the coast, the surface of the country became flat and swampy. Large ponds or pools were met every mile or so, and the creeks spread out into several miry branches. The roads between the creeks and ponds, though apparently
n hour after midnight, when it reached a point about four miles from Birdsville, having marched thirteen miles. On the second, my brigade resumed its march at forty-five minutes past nine A. M., leading its division and following the Second divisirst of December, we marched in the direction of Millen, about fifteen miles, reaching camp about one o'clock A. M. On the second, we marched about fifteen miles to Buckhead Church. On the third, we marched about fifteen miles, passing about three mi, I was sent out in charge of a party of five hundred and fifty men, and a train of wagons, to be gone three days. On the second day out, the party was attacked by a force of guerrillas several times. I parked the train, deployed the men into line, I am unable to estimate; of forage obtained by this regiment alone, it is impossible to say what was the amount. On the second day of the expedition, this regiment, together with the Seventy-third Ohio volunteer infantry, in charge of which I was p
ral Sherman, intimating that Hood was crossing the Chattahoochee, in the direction of Blue Mountain, and directed me to watch well for the appearance of infantry in or about Cedartown. Spies and scouts were sent out in every direction, frequent reconnoissances made with the cavalry, and no positive information gained of the enemy, except the whereabouts and movement of their cavalry, and that Hood had crossed a part, if not all his force, over the Chattahoochee. I ascertained, on the second instant, that the enemy's cavalry had destroyed the railroad at or near Big Shanty, that Wheeler was at Villanow, and had sent a detachment to assault Dalton, which sent in a summons to surrender, but did not await to attack. Later in the day a train was captured near Acworth, and the road torn up three miles south of Allatoona, and on the following day, (October third,) General Sherman ordered me to suspend a movement I contemplated, stating that Hood was gradually developing his plans, which
t to withstand the armies of rebeldom. They have seen the old flag of the United States carried by its victorious legions through their State, almost unopposed, and placed in their principal city without a blow. Since the occupation of the city, General Sherman has been occupied in making arrangements for its security, after he leaves it for the march that he meditates. My attention has been directed to such measures of cooperation as the number and quality of my force permit. On the second, I arrived here from Charleston, whither, as I stated in my despatch of the twenty-ninth December, I had gone, in consequence of information from the senior officer there, that the rebels contemplated issuing from the harbor, and his request for my presence. Having placed a force there of seven monitors, sufficient to meet such an emergency, and not perceiving any sign of the expected raid, I returned to Savannah, to keep in communication with General Sherman, and be ready to render any a
orris Island, or simply holding the firm landing on James Island for future use against Charleston. The rear column of the expedition with one field-battery and over three thousand men, except some thirteen companies in the present sent by mistake to Edisto, left Hilton Head on the morning of the second of June, General Wright's orders having been duly despatched to him the previous day. As the flag-boat, with Generals Hunter and Benham on board, was passing the Edisto, about noon of the second, a steamer came out with a letter from General Wright, saying that he expected to be coming in to Legareville, on the Stono, soon after light on the following morning. The troops on the transports continued on to the Stono, and entering that river, the greater portion landed that afternoon, Monday, June second, at the lower old battery landing, and in placing their pickets about one mile in advance, were at once engaged with the enemy in a smart skirmish, where some six or eight men were ki
which we have agreed to liberate an excess of prisoners of war in our hands, a sacred regard for plighted faith which shrinks from the semblance of breaking a promise precludes a resort to such an extremity, nor is it his desire to extend to any other forces of the United States the punishment merited by General Pope and such commissioned officers as choose to participate in the execution of his infamous order. I have the honor to be very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. E. Lee, General Commanding. Reply of General Halleck. Headquarters of the army, Washington, August 9, 1862. General R. E. Lee, Commanding, etc.: General: Your two communications of the second instant, with inclosures are received. As these papers are couched in language exceedingly insulting to the Government of the United States, I must respectfully decline to receive them. They are returned herewith. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief, U. S. Army.
might be disposed to make to recover their liberty. The difficulties that surrounded them were fully appreciated, and we expected to derive more assistance in the attainment of our object from the just fears of the Washington Government, than from any active demonstration on the part of the people, unless success should enable us to give them assurance of continued protection. Influenced by these considerations, the army was put in motion. D. H. Hill's division, which had joined us on the second, being in advance, and, between the fourth and seventh of September, crossed the Potomac at the ford near Leesburgh, and encamped in the vicinity of Fredericktown. It was decided to cross the Potomac east of the Blue Ridge, in order, by threatening Washington and Baltimore, to cause the enemy to withdraw from the south bank, where his presence endangered our communications and the safety of those engaged in the removal of our wounded and the captured property from the late battle-field.
vantage from want of ammunition. Wednesday morning, the second, a very heavy rain set in; the troops remained in bivouac,tly superior to ours. Shortly after six A. M., on the second instant, I was ordered to bivouac some two miles from the fronad joins the Long Bridge road. Late in the evening of the second, I received orders from General Lee to return to this posthe action on Malvern Hill, during the afternoon of the second instant: My brigade consisted of the following named regimeidge; the execution of which order occupied Wednesday, the second, and Thursday, the third July. On the fourth July, I reith a few exceptions, acted nobly. On the next day, the second, Colonel Delagnel, chief of artillery, ordered me back to engagement, my only loss being one man wounded. On the second, I maintained the position of the previous day, until it wts with the enemy from the twenty-eighth ultimo to the second instant, I have only to mention the conduct of Lieutenant L. D