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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 1,094 1,094 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 47 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 36 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 36 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 35 35 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 32 32 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 27 27 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 20 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 2nd or search for 2nd in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of the Wilderness. (search)
talion of artillery) to General R. E. Lee, commanding Army of Northern Virginia. On the 14th I reached Charlottesville, and awaited there the arrival of my troops, which were somewhat delayed by want of transportation on railroad. As the troops arrived they were encamped at points between Charlottesville and Gordonsville. On the 22d, in obedience to orders received from the Commanding-General, I marched my command to Mechanicsville, and encamped in the near neighborhood thereof. On the 2d Field's division was moved to the north of Gordonsville, to meet an expected advance of a portion of the enemy by way of Liberty mills. On the 4th was advised by the Commanding-General that the enemy appeared to be moving towards Stevensburg, and, as directed by him, started about four (4) o'clock in the afternoon and marched to Brock's bridge, on the border of Orange county, a distance of about sixteen (16) miles. Early on the morning of the 5th resumed my march on the----and Catharpin ro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General C. M. Wilcox on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
and of General Humphreys in the afternoon of the 2d, when I read what General Longstreet had writtentment for correct position of his brigade on the 2d. I much prefer the evidence I used in my first e ending in Round Top on the Federal left on the 2d, and but few are seen there on the map of the 3df not attacking at sunrise on the morning of the 2d, goes farther, and says that when he left Generaon the enemy's right with the dawn of day on the 2d. * * * * He determined to make the main attack wme to begin the movement at an early hour on the 2d. Longstreet was within three miles of Gettysbuld begin the attack as early as possible on the 2d, and Ewell and Hill to afford him vigorous co-opordered to move at 4 A. M. on the morning of the 2d, but did not leave camp until about sunup. Geto General Lee's headquarters at daylight on the 2d, and renewed his objections to attacking, but wirsburg, reaching that point at early dawn on the 2d. I at once went to General Lee's headquarters a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--official reports. (search)
h orders, I withdrew to the hill north and west of Gettysburg, where we remained until the following day in the hope that the enemy would give us battle on ground of our own selection. My loss in this terrible battle was heavy, including some of the most valuable officers of the command. Major J. W. Latimer of Andrews' battalion, the boy major, whose chivalrous bearing on so many fields had won for him a reputation to be envied by his seniors,--received a severe wound on the evening of the 2d, from the effects of which he has since died. Major B. W. Leigh, my Chief of Staff, whose concientious discharge of duty, superior attainments and noble bearing made him invaluable to me, was killed within a short distance of the enemy's line. Major H. K. Douglas, Assistant Adjutant-General, was severely wounded while in the discharge of his duties, and is still a prisoner. My orderly, W. H. Webb, remained with me after being severely wounded. His conduct entitles him to a commission.