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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 1,932 1,932 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 53 53 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 29 29 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 25 25 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 24 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 22 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 21 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 20 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 19 19 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 16 16 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for 3rd or search for 3rd in all documents.

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e. Since night before last, I have not left my husband's side for a moment, except to get such things as I re quired, or to hand some poor fellow a cup of water. Even as I write my heart throbs achingly to hear the deep groans and sharp cries about me. F----is sleeping, but I dare not close my eyes, lest he should die while I sleep. And it is to keep awake, and in a manner relieve my overburdened heart, that I am now writing you under such sad circumstances. On the morning of the third instant the fight began. The attack was made on General McArthur's division, and we could plainly hear the roll of the artillery here, as it is about two miles and a half distant only from this place. Oh! the fearful agony of that awful, awful day! I had seen F----a moment early in the morning, but it was only a moment, when he bade me good-by, saying hurriedly as he tore himself away: Pray for me, my wife, and, if I fall, God protect you! There was something in his look and tone which struc
ff. Thompson, in North-east Arkansas. The distance from the starting-point of the expedition to the supposed rendezvous of the rebels was about one hundred and ten miles, and the greater portion of the route lay through a howling wilderness. The imaginary suffering that our soldiers endured during the first two days of their march was enormous. It was impossible to steal or confiscate uncultivated real estate, and not a hog, or a chicken, or an ear of corn was anywhere to be seen. On the third day, however, affairs looked more hopeful, for a few small specks of ground, in a state of partial cultivation, were here and there visible. On that day, Lieutenant Wickfield, of an Indiana cavalry regiment, commanded the advanceguard, consisting of eight mounted men. About noon he came up to a small farm-house, from the outward appearance of which he judged that there might be something fit to eat inside. He halted his company, dismounted, and with two second lieutenants entered the dwell
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore), Perry's rebel brigade at the battle of Gettysburgh. (search)
arge upon the enemy's lines at Gettysburgh on the second of July. From information received from several officers of that brigade, and who were in the charge, I am satisfied that the brigade (which is very small) acted well — that it advanced along with Wilcox's and Wright's brigades until it was overwhelmed by vastly superior numbers, and that even then it only fell back in obedience to orders, and when it was apparent that the day was lost. I learn, also, that it was engaged again on the third, when Pickett's charge was made, and that it suffered severely in this latter charge. This correction and explanation is due to those gallant soldiers, and I trust that all the papers that published the original letter, as a matter of simple justice will publish this also. Just after a battle there are so many reports and rumors of particular commands, that it is not at all surprising that grave errors should be made by those who write hurriedly, and not alone from what they see, but fro
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore), Colonel Morrow's Recollections. (search)
rebel position, without their obtaining the least knowledge of it. In fact, General Hooker succeeded in dividing the rebel army, cutting off Stuart from Lee, and obliging the former to cut his way through in order to reach headquarters. However, we lost the battle, and fell back into our old camp. At Gettsburgh, with my assistant surgeon, Dr. Collar, indefatigable in season and out of season, I visited the hospitals and the battle-field — the latter at twelve o'clock in the night on the third, determining the names of those that had fallen. In a barn, among two hundred others, I found a little Irish boy from this city, Patrick Cleary, a bright boy, and a brace little fellow. I said to him: Patrick, how do you feel? He said: Pretty well, but the doctor says I can't live. I looked at his wounded leg and saw that mortification had set in. I said: I don't know; the doctor is the best judge. If he says you can't live, you had better prepare to die. Said he: Colonel, if you'll ha