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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 1,932 1,932 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 53 53 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 29 29 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 25 25 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 24 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 22 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 21 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 20 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 19 19 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 16 16 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for 3rd or search for 3rd in all documents.

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s from Cave Spring to Cedar Town, and on the following day pushed forward in the same order, the Seventeenth corps reaching Van Wert, and the Fifteenth encamping a few mile south of Van Wert. The army continued its march, and on the night of the third, both corps encamped in the vicinity of Dallas. On the following day, the Seventeenth corps moved to Lost Mountain, while the Fifteenth proceeded in the direction of Powder Springs. The movement continued, and the whole command reached Smyrnathe first to the eighth of December, our line of march was down the Peninsula between the Ogeechee and Savannah Rivers, following the Louisville and Savannah Road, encamping on the first on Baker's Creek; on the second, at Buckhead Church; on the third, at Horse Creek; on the fourth, at Little Ogeechee; on the fifth, at Sylvania Cross-Roads; on the sixth, near Cowpens Creek; on the seventh, on Jack's Branch, near Springfield; and on the eighth, near Eden Cross-Roads. As we approached the coa
e miles south of Louisville. Between the Oconee and Ogeechee, the roads, excepting at the river and swamp crossings, were good, the country very level, and the weather, during the march, superb. Supplies of all kinds were very abundant. From the first to the eighth of December, our line of march was down the Peninsula between the Ogeechee and Savannah Rivers, following the Louisville and Savannah Road, encamping on the first on Baker's Creek; on the second, at Buckhead Church; on the third, at Horse Creek; on the fourth, at Little Ogeechee; on the fifth, at Sylvania Cross-Roads; on the sixth, near Cowpens Creek; on the seventh, on Jack's Branch, near Springfield; and on the eighth, near Eden Cross-Roads. As we approached the coast, the surface of the country became flat and swampy. Large ponds or pools were met every mile or so, and the creeks spread out into several miry branches. The roads between the creeks and ponds, though apparently of sand, and substantial characte
all consumed, and the owner admonished that a repetition of his offence would bring a similar fate upon his dwelling at the next visitation of our army. On the third, my brigade marched at seven A. M. on the Sylvania road. My command occupied the centre of the division and was unencumbered with wagons. My brigade crossed the ed in the direction of Millen, about fifteen miles, reaching camp about one o'clock A. M. On the second, we marched about fifteen miles to Buckhead Church. On the third, we marched about fifteen miles, passing about three miles north of Millen, and marching in the direction of Sylvania. On the fourth, we marched about twelve milmpaign which has just terminated in the capture of Savannah. The march was continued the first twenty-four hours with only a halt for dinner at Decatur. On the third day we reached Social Circle, where the brigade was directed to destroy the railroad, and the regiment assisted in destroying it for some six miles; working from t
e River, which was reached the seventh, the Third division, General John E. Smith, with my own, formed a column, under my command, and was somewhat exposed to annoyance from the enemy endeavoring to reach Savannah from the west, before us. On the third, the Fifty-third Ohio lost by capture a foraging-party of one officer and eleven men. On the fourth, near Statesboro, the foragers met a brigade of the enemy's cavalry endeavoring to join Wheeler; were attacked by them, and driven to the main have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of this command during the recent campaign. From the occupation of Atlanta, Georgia, the regiment was engaged in building quarters and the usual duties of camp-life until the third instant, when we were ordered to report to Colonel N. M. Crane, commanding a provisional brigade, doing guard-duty in the city. Here we remained until the commencement of the recent campaign. On the morning of November fifteenth, we broke camp, and
ere, that the rebels contemplated issuing from the harbor, and his request for my presence. Having placed a force there of seven monitors, sufficient to meet such an emergency, and not perceiving any sign of the expected raid, I returned to Savannah, to keep in communication with General Sherman, and be ready to render any assistance that might be desired. General Sherman has fully informed me of his plans, and so far as my means permit, they shall not lack assistance by water. On the third, the transfer of the right wing to Beaufort was begun, and the only suitable vessel I had at hand (the Harvest Moon) was sent to Thunderbolt to receive the first embarkation. This took place about three P. M., and was witnessed by General Sherman and General Barnard (U. S. Engineers) and myself. The Pontiac is ordered around to assist, and the army transports also followed the first move by the Harvest Moon. I could not help remarking on the unbroken silence that prevailed in the large
traggling behind their commands, and posting them in a piece of wood near the turnpike, he awaited the advance of the Federal cavalry, now pushing forward to reap the fruits of the panic produced by the shells. As they approached within easy range, he poured such an effective fire into their ranks as to empty a number of saddles and check their further pursuit for that day. Having transferred the Second and Sixth Virginia cavalry to Ashby, he was placed in command of the rear-guard. On the third, after my command had crossed the bridge over the Shenandoah, near Mount Jackson, General Ashby was ordered to destroy it, which he barely succeeded in accomplishing before the Federal forces reached the opposite bank of the river. Here his horse was killed by the enemy, and he made a very narrow escape with his life. We reached Harrisonburgh at an early hour on the morning of the fifth, and, passing beyond that town, turned toward the east in the direction of Port Republic. On the sixt
f their gunboats in the James River. On the morning of the third, my command arrived near the landing and drove in the enemy all the time. My brigade remained in camp until the third instant, about ten or eleven o'clock A. M. I was then ordered treport to General A. P. Hill, which I did that evening, the third, and remained subject to his orders until the eleventh instday, until it was ascertained the enemy had fled. On the third, I returned to camp near Richmond, by order of General Lee,ivision, with whom it remained until the morning of the third instant, when relieved by you, and ordered to my camp. The bats, Assistant Adjutant-General: sir: On Thursday, the third instant, late in the afternoon, I was directed by Brigadier-Gend, spent in camp, at Low Swamp Church; and on Thursday, the third, it retraced its footsteps, and camped near White Oak SwampSeven Pines to refit, where we remained until Thursday, the third, when we again joined the division below White Oak Swamp, a
s being posted on the left flank, at right angles to it. The rest of the division remained in its former position, and Colonel Walker, of the Thirteenth Virginia regiment, was assigned to the command of Trimble's brigade. On the morning of the third, the division, with the rest of the troops, was moved to the. left, crossing the Loudon and Hampshire Railroad at a station above Vienna, and then passing through Dranesville in the direction of Leesburg, and encamped on a creek not far from Dran withdrawn to the road for bivouac. Captain Thurston, ordnance officer of my division, was here captured while carrying my orders, riding into the enemy's lines by mistake. Remaining in position at Ox Hill during the second, I marched, on the third, for Leesburg by the Dranesville road, crossing Goose Creek, and reaching that place on the evening of the fourth. On the morning of sixth September, I crossed my division into Maryland, now increased to six brigades, by the addition of Kemper's