hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 1,932 1,932 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 53 53 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 29 29 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 25 25 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 24 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 22 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 21 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 20 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 19 19 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 16 16 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 3rd or search for 3rd in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations against Newbern in 1864. (search)
cut the railroad and they returned without accomplishing it. Captain Bright then, by my direction, ordered him to join me. General Barton said he would try to cross at Pollocksville, but would be unable to cross that night (the 2d), and expressed some doubt as to whether he could cross at all at that point; should he fail there, he would be compelled to go much higher up the river. Thus the earliest possible moment at which he could have joined me, would have been on the evening of the 3d instant. I could not thus have attacked before the 4th instant. General Barton afterwards informed me, verbally, that he could, positively, have done nothing on his side of the river. General Barton had orders from me, in case he found it impracticable to perform his part of the work, which was the most important, to at once cross to me, and let me try a coup de main. I could, however, hear nothing from him for some time, and when I did, it was the unsatisfactory note I have alluded to. On
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Ocean Pond, Florida. (search)
h Carolina, but he promised to repair to any point threatened or attacked by the enemy, and give the officer there in command the benefit of his experience and assistance. On the 2nd instant I reached Camp Milton, General Gardner's Headquarters, in rear of McGirt's creek, twelve or thirteen miles distant from Jacksonville, where I found our troops in position. The day preceding, our advanced pickets had been thrown forward to Cedar creek, within six or seven miles of Jacksonville. On the 3rd Major-General J. Patton Anderson also arrived at Camp Milton, and assumed command on the 6th instant of the forces, now about eight thousand effectives of all arms. In the meantime it had been ascertained, from reliable sources, that the enemy occupied Jacksonville with at least twelve thousand men, that the position, naturally strong, had been much strenghtened since the battle of the 20th ultimo, and that four or five gunboats in the St. John's effectually commanded the approaches to the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Capture of General Seammon. (search)
General Samuel Jones. [Received at Richmond, February, 1864, by telegraph from Dublin 15th.] To General S. Cooper, Adjutant-and Inspector-General: On the 3d instant Major Nounnan, with a detachment of forty men of the Sixteenth Virginia cavalry, captured the armed steamer, B. C. Lera, at Winfield, Putnam county, Virginia, w orders and discretionary powers, and moved in the direction of the Kanawha river, along which stream I manoeuvred in the counties of Mason and Putnam until the 3d instant. I entered Winfield, Putnam Court-house, on the morning of the 3d instant, at 3 o'clock, with forty men and found a number of government officials there (who3d instant, at 3 o'clock, with forty men and found a number of government officials there (whom I failed to secure) and a government steamer, with a strong guard and a piece of artillery, lying upon the opposite side of the river. With great difficulty I secured a small craft, capable only of carrying four men, with which I crossed a small party of twelve men under Lieutenant E. G. Vertigan, who obeyed my instructions as
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Correspondence of Governor Campbell of Tennessee-original letters. from a committee of citizens. (search)
Correspondence of Governor Campbell of Tennessee-original letters. from a committee of citizens. 4th January, 1823, at Nashville, Tenn. Sir,--At a meeting of the committee of the citizens of Nashville, assembled on the 3rd inst., for the purpose of considering of and fixing the mode, best calculated for the celebration of the anniversary of the 8th of January, 1815, it was unanimously Resolved, That the Honorable George W. Campbell be requested to deliver to General Jackson an appropriate address at one o'clock of that day, and that Captain Bradford be requested to meet the General at the Stone bridge, escort him to town en militaire and form his company in the rear of the base of the courthouse during the oration. We are gratified in communicating to you this resolution extracted from the minutes of the proceedings of the committee of arrangement, and are pleased by the anticipation of your compliance with a request, made in the spirit of defference, and by those who
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Expedition to Hardy and Hampshire. (search)
was then marched back to Moorefield, and Rosser was sent down Patterson's Creek to collect cattle and cut the Baltimore and Ohio railroad. He reached the road on the 2nd at the mouth of Patterson's Creek, and destroyed the bridge over the north branch of the Potomac. He also destroyed another bridge over the canal, and a lock of the canal itself. In the meantime a considerable cavalry force had made its appearance at Romney, and Rosser returned to Moorefield, which place he reached on the 3rd, with a number of cattle and sheep. McNeil crossed over to the eastern ridge of the Alleghany, and brought off over three hundred cattle. After Rosser's return, I gave orders for the troops, trains, &c., to start back early next morning, as we had accomplished all we then could, and accordingly every thing but the cavalry was in motion very soon; and after Thomas's brigade had gone about four miles from Moorefield, a considerable force of the enemy's cavalry, with some artillery, made its
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last days of the Confederate Treasury and what became of its specie. (search)
ngton, Ga., communications were received from General John C. Breckinridge that payments had been promised to the cavalry from the train by him at a halt on the road the night of the 3d. The action of General Breckinridge in the premises was ratified, and President Davis gave some other directions before he left. General Breckinridge arrived in Washington, Ga., an hour or so after President Davis left, and my recollection of his statement was in brief as follows: That during the night of the 3d, en route from Abbeville, S. C., to Washington, Ga., he found the cavalry and train at a halt, resting. Stopping, he learned from the officers that the men were dissatisfied at the position of affairs; that they were guarding a train which could not be carried safely much farther; the Federal cavalry were known to be in full force not a great distance off; the destination and disposition of their own force was an uncertain one; their paper money was worthless for their needs; that they might