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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 2,787 2,787 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 50 50 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 46 46 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 28 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 27 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 21 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 20 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 19 19 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 17 17 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 16 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for 4th or search for 4th in all documents.

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Doc. 2.-the returned prisoners. In the Senate of the United States. May 9, 1864. Mr. Wade submitted the following report. The Joint Committee on the conduct and expenditures of the war submitted the following report, with the accompanying testimony. On the fourth instant your Committee received a communication of that date from the Secretary of War, inclosing the report of Colonel Hoffman, Commissary General of prisoners, dated May third, calling the attention of the Committee to the condition of returned Union prisoners, with the request that the Committee would immediately proceed to Annapolis and examine with their own eyes the condition of those who have been returned from rebel captivity. The Committee resolved that they would comply with the request of the Secretary of War on the first opportunity. The fifth of May was devoted by the Committee to concluding their labors upon the investigation of the Fort Pillow massacre. On the sixth of May, however, the Committe
ance into the bay; but owing to delays mentioned in Captain Jenkins's communication to me, the Tecumseh was not ready. General Granger, however, to my mortification, was up to time, and the troops actually landed on Dauphin Island. As subsequent events proved, the delay turned to our advantage, as the rebels were busily engaged during the fourth in throwing troops and supplies into Fort Gaines, all of which were captured a few days afterward. The Tecumseh arrived on the evening of the fourth, and every thing being propitious, I proceeded to the attack on the following morning. As mentioned in my previous despatch, the vessels outside the bar, which were designed to participate in the engagement, were all under way by forty minutes past five in the morning, in the following order, two abreast, and lashed together: Brooklyn, Captain James Alden, with the Octorara, Lieutenant Commander C. H. Green, on the port side; Hartford, Captain Percival Drayton, with the Metacomet, Lieuten
ana, Twenty-ninth Wisconsin, and Twenty-fourth Iowa, with one section of artillery. It was fortunate that I did so, for, while the fight was proceeding with General Burbridge's command, Colonel Bayler, of the First Texas mounted rifles, swept round on our left, and attacked the camp at Carrion Crow Bayou, but they were driven off with a loss of three killed; we lost none. I refer particularly to the report of General Burbridge for the names of those deserving honorable mention. On the fourth instant the enemy sent in a flag of truce, proposing to give up such of our wounded as they had, not having the means to take care of them. I sent for and received forty-seven. They refused to give up our wounded officers, among them Colonel Guppy, of the Twenty-third Wisconsin, a most gallant and meritorious officer; though wounded, I am pleased to learn that his wound is not severe, and that all our prisoners are being well treated. As to the force of the enemy engaged, opinions are conflic
Army of Western Virginia extended from Pocahontas County to the Tennessee line. Colonel William L. Jackson, with a small force of cavalry and a section of artillery, occupied the extreme right at or beyond Mill Point, in Pocahontas County--a point about forty miles from Lewisburgh, where was stationed the First brigade, commanded by Brigadier-General Echols, and Chapman's battery, with two regiments of Jackson's cavalry brigade and two pieces of Jackson's battery. On the night of the fourth instant, General Echols received a despatch from Colonel Johnson, stating that the enemy was advancing in force. It was determined to reinforce him at once, and the First brigade, with Chapman's battery, with one regiment of cavalry, (the Fourteenth Virginia,) and the two pieces of Jackson's battery, started at once for that purpose. The Sixteenth Virginia cavalry was left to scout and guard the roads leading from the Kanawha Valley. The command reached a point about fourteen miles from Lewis
to the enemy. This terminated the battle, and the rebels retired defeated from the field. The opposing forces in this sanguinary contest were nearly equal in numbers, and both fought with the most desperate courage. The commanders were also brave, skilful, and experienced, and both handled their troops on the field with distinguished ability; but to General Meade belongs the honor of a well-earned victory, in one of the greatest and best-fought battles of the war. On the morning of the fourth, the enemy apparently occupied a new line in front of our left, but in reality, his army had commenced to retreat, carrying off a part of his wounded. His lines, however, were not entirely evacuated till the morning of the fifth, when the cavalry and Sixth corps were sent in pursuit. The days of the fifth and sixth were employed by General Meade in succoring the wounded and burying the dead left on the battle-field. He then started in pursuit of Lee by a flank movement upon Middletown.
Doc. 42.-battle in New-Mexico. Fort Sumner, New-Mexico, Saturday, January 30, 1864. On the fourth day of this month, at half-past 11 o'clock, the bugle sounded, To arms! To arms! which roused every man in camp. Our company was out on a thirty days scout at the time, only having left six men of the company (B, Second cavalry, California volunteers) in camp, but the six were in their saddles in double-quick, and off. The party consisted of one Lieutenant (infantry) and six men of company B, Second cavalry, California volunteers, three men of company D, Fifth United States infantry, twenty-five Apache Indians, and three Mexican citizens. At ten minutes to twelve o'clock we started down the river Pecos, and soon found the cause of alarm. One hundred and twenty Navajo Indians had been within two miles of the fort, and stolen all the Apache horses and mules, and were driving them off as leisurely as though they had paid for them. We rode for twelve miles at a brisk gallop,
order to fully establish the truth. I reserve for any suitable occasion abundant documentary evidence to support the facts furnished. On Saturday, July fourth, both armies continued to face each other during the entire day; without either manifesting a disposition to attack. The enemy says Meade, drew back his left flank, but maintained his position in front of our left, as if always conscious that our vulnerable point was there, and they were loth to retire from it. On the night of the fourth, Lee, finding his ammunition exhausted, and his subsistence imperilled, decided to withdraw, and he began his retreat toward Williamsport, with four thousand of our prisoners, and all his immense trains. On the morning of the fifth, this event became known, and General Meade despatched the Sixth corps in pursuit, together with some squadrons of cavalry. The fifth and sixth of July were employed, says Meade's report, in succoring the wounded and burying the dead. The enemy made good use of
Colonel Coates established his headquarters in the town, and eight companies of his regiment, commanded by Major McKee, took possession of the earthwork, on a commanding point, a half-mile distant from the city. Thus matters stood till the fourth instant, when General Ross sent in a communication, asking what would be the treatment of prisoners if taken by negro soldiers. Colonel Coates replied that they would be treated with the respect due prisoners of war. On the night of the fourth, Rfourth, Ross was reenforced by a brigade of Tennessee troops, numbering eight hundred men, commanded by Brigadier-General R. V. Richardson; and at seven o'clock on the morning of the fifth, an attack was made upon Major McKee, who held the redoubt, while a portion of the enemy went to the left, flanking his position, and entered the town, and came within twenty feet of Colonel Coates's headquarters before they received a check from our men, who were pouring a deadly fire upon them from the windows. Here
ace, two excellent earthworks are thrown up, one of which commands the river for more than two miles. It was my intention to burn the town; but finding so many women and children in it, I spared it. We found there three thirty-two pounder guns and carriages. The guns I brought away, and burnt the carriages and platforms. Hearing that the rebels had a pontoon-bridge a mile from the mouth of Little River, I sent the Cricket up, and burned it. I remained at Trinity until the morning of the fourth, when we proceeded down Black River, and picking up all the cotton near the bank, anchored at dark about twelve miles from the mouth. At daylight on the fifth, I got under way, and arrived at this place at meridian. I am much indebted to the officers of the different vessels for the manner in which they performed their duty. I regret to report that eight men were wounded on the Fort Hindman, one mortally, (since dead,) and two severely. One man was wounded severely on the Osage; Acting
y, and the Seventeenth, which formed the right, at the railroad-bridge, eight miles below. No tents were taken with us, and all, from the General Commanding to the rank and file, bivouacked by a thousand camp-fires in the open air, on the first night, five miles east of Black River, having marched a distance of twenty miles. One brigade of cavalry, under command of Colonel Winslow, and a battalion, commanded by Captain John Foster, accompanied the expedition, and on the morning of the fourth, Foster's advance-guard was met by Adams's rebel cavalry, at Champion Hills, who charged upon our small force, running over them, and taking seven prisoners. Their loss was one man killed and one wounded and left on the field. Captain Foster pushed forward and made a dash upon the enemy, and routed him with considerable loss. Their forces, consisting of about seven thousand men, commanded by Generals Wirt Adams, Ross, and Ferguson, and the whole under command of General S. D. Lee, then fel
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