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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 2,787 2,787 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 50 50 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 46 46 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 28 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 27 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 21 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 20 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 19 19 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 17 17 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 16 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 4th or search for 4th in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
in killed, wounded and missing, eighty-six and three-tenths per cent. In killed and wounded alone, according to Colonel Fox, the 26th North Carolina stands third on the list of great losses, having seventy-one and seven-tenths per cent, against eighty-two and three-tenths per cent of the 1st Texas at Sharpsburg, and seventy-six per cent of the 21st Georgia at Manassas. That few of the 120 missing from this regiment, on July 1, returned, is indicated by the number reported for duty on the 4th. out of 820 men, or ninety-seven and five-tenths per cent. This loss exceeded by four per cent. the loss of the 1st Minnesota at Gettysburg, which amounted to eighty-two per cent. The 141st Pennsylvania comes second, with seventy-five and seven-tenths per cent. In the Franco-Prussian war, the heaviest loss was forty-nine per cent, sustained by the 16th German Infantry (3rd Westphalian) at Mars-la-Tour. In the charge of the Light Brigade, the loss was but thirty-six and seven-tenths per cent
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Company D, Clarke Cavalry. (search)
at different times prisoners, and nearly every one of them wears a scar. One hundred and eighteen sleep their last sleep; they have fought their last battle, and no sound can awake them to glory again. A company that had 170 men, fought fifty-seven pitched battles, had eighty-three men killed, thirty-five to die after the war, and fifty-two, by no fault of theirs, left wondering how it was possible that they escaped, surely deserve the credit of having tried to do their duty. On the fourth Thursday in May, 1861, the ordinance of secession was ratified by the people of Virginia by 130,000 majority. It did not wait for that, but had been in the field for more than a month previous to said action. For four long years 500,000 of us, all told, on land and sea, fought more than three millions of soldiers, and absolutely wore ourselves out whipping them. We fought the good fight; we kept the faith—are still keeping it—and when the problems, anxieties, and disappointments that abso
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.45 (search)
n the meantime, Colonel Laughlin, deciding to have the ceremonies at all events, telegraphed Mrs. Love, President of the Ladies' Association, to prepare a wooden monument, of the height of the granite one, and cover it with evergreens, so that no one could tell the difference. This was done, but happily was not needed. The monument arrived at Winchester on the night of the 3d. The foundation had long been ready, as well as the appliances for placing the granite in position. Early on the 4th, through the energy of Colonel Williams, of the Ashby Camp, and others, a large force was put to work, and the monument completed and made ready for the exercises. The day was bright, cheerful and clear, the oratory was stirring, and the huge crowd present were in thorough sympathy with the sentiment of the occasion. * * * * In ante-bellum days, the Winchester cemetery began about three squares from Main street, and covered a comparatively small area. So many were the engagements in the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.59 (search)
erform. On the night of the 1st of April, when Grant made his final attack at Petersburg, Lane's Brigade was cut in two by an overwhelming force. The 28th was forced to fall back fighting to the plank road and then to the Cox road; and it finally succeeded in rejoining the rest of the brigade in the inner line of works, where it fought until night, when Petersburg was evacuated. On the afternoon of the 3d it crossed the Appomattox at Goode's Bridge, bivouacked at Amelia Courthouse on the 4th, and formed line of battle between the Courthouse and Jetersville on the 5th, and skirmished with the enemy. Next day while resting in Farmville, it, with the rest of the brigade, was ordered back to a hill to support the hard-pressed cavalry; but before reaching the hill the order was countermanded. It moved back through Farmville and sustained some loss from the enemy's artillery while crossing the river near that place. That afternoon it formed line of battle, faced to the rear, between