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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 2,787 2,787 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 50 50 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 46 46 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 28 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 27 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 21 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 20 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 19 19 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 17 17 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 16 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for 4th or search for 4th in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—the war on the Rapidan. (search)
he positions-occupied by the Sixth corps on the 4th. Hooker would thus have secured all the advants he thought best. Later on the morning of the 4th, Hooker sent him several other despatches, whic offensive, either one way or the other, on the 4th, the role of the Sixth corps was changed; the ffied his expectations. In the afternoon of the 4th, Hooker, finding that the enemy did not come toh he had not thought proper to undertake on the 4th. Sedgwick, isolated as he was, could not fightn, the operation had proved successful. On the 4th he was carried to Guiney's Station, between Freit effective, and he again joined Buford on the 4th, without having destroyed the great bridge of t distance east of Thompson's Cross-roads on the 4th, at a place called Shannon's Hill, and brought ailway at Hungary Station on the morning of the 4th, burnt the depot, cut down the telegraphic lineway at Tunstall's Station on the morning of the 4th, just as Kilpatrick was making his appearance a
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—--the Mississippi. (search)
of Nashville, replacing Coburn's brigade, which had left this village the previous day in order to join Gilbert at Franklin. The general movement commences on the 4th. There are three columns on the march. The strongest, the left one, is composed of the whole of Sheridan's division and Minty's two brigades of cavalry. Leaving of cavalry, with two pieces of artillery, along the turnpike between Nashville and Columbia, in order to watch the neighborhood of Franklin. On the morning of the 4th, almost in close vicinity of this village, Coburn falls in with the troops above mentioned, and in order to open himself a passage is obliged to deploy his forces. drove the Confederates beyond the Tallahatchie. During the month of June the latter, anxious to conceal their real weakness, showed themselves very active. On the 4th, Wirt Adams' troopers, who covered Johnston's small army, advanced as far as Satartia on the Yazoo River, and did not retire until after meeting the superior force
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Pennsylvania. (search)
alled to mind the conflict of the 3d of May. Precisely one month to a day had elapsed since this battle when Longstreet's First division, under McLaws, penetrated this henceforth historical Wilderness. Another division followed it closely; the Third, under Hood, was already on the banks of the Rapidan, and the whole army corps, crossing this river, reached the neighborhood of Culpeper Courthouse on the evening of the 7th. A portion of Ewells corps had started in the same direction on the 4th; the remainder moved forward on the morning of the 5th: Hill's corps, therefore, was the only one left to occupy the positions from Taylor's Hill to Hamilton's Crossing in which the army had passed the winter, and it had to be deployed along this line in order to conceal the departure of two-thirds of the army. The vigilance of the outposts had, in fact, prevented Hooker's spies from reporting this departure to him: no one had been able to cross the river for several days. But the movement
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—Third winter. (search)
dventurous chiefs were struck. Moreover, the Army of the Potomac, in addition to its positive losses, is still further reduced by the absence of from twelve to fifteen thousand men who did not answer to their names at the morning roll-call on the 4th. The retreat of the Confederate army is begun; Lee's plan is decided on. His objective is the ponton bridge left by him on the Potomac at Falling Waters, four miles below the ford at Williamsport. To recruit his strength before risking furthertages afforded him by this retreat of an army whose infantry and artillery did not number more than forty thousand men all told. If, on his part, he cannot bring together more than fifty-five thousand combatants of both arms on the morning of the 4th, he knows that two days of rest would bring him back at least ten thousand stragglers. Moreover, the President and General Halleck, stimulated by the hope of seeing Lee crushed before he has crossed the Potomac, do not hesitate any longer to supp