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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 2,787 2,787 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 50 50 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 46 46 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 28 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 27 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 21 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 20 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 19 19 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 17 17 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 16 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 21, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for 4th or search for 4th in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: December 21, 1861., [Electronic resource], Sad case of sympathy — death of the son of a Richmond merchant. (search)
e family, and who placed them at a boarding school. Here they remained, and on account of pressing business engagements the father was unable to visit his offspring. Time wore on, and the breaking out of the Southern rebellion cut off all communication between parent and children.--Some three weeks since the lad, Silas Omohundro, was taken seriously ill with the typhoid fever, and, in spite of the exertions of skillful physicians and the tender solicitude of his guardian, he died on the 4th instant. Information of the lad's death was sent to General Wool, at Fortress Monroe, with the request that he would forward it to the father at Richmond. It is not known whether the message was received or not as no reply has yet been returned. The only relative present at the funeral was the Rev. Mr. Henson, of the Baptist Church, Broad and Brown streets, who was not even aware of the presence of the children in Philadelphia until he heard of the death of the boy. The funeral was very largel
The Daily Dispatch: December 21, 1861., [Electronic resource], Important from Mississippi sound — large Lincoln force on Ship Island — immense reinforcements expected. (search)
y Dear Friend: --I have just seen Captain Legarde, of the fishing smack Wild Duck — He was captured 1st December, on the west and of cat Island. He has been a prisoner on the Massachusetts until the 12th, when himself and twelve other fishermen were released, their vessels being confiscated, in retaliation for the Lincoln fishing-smacks the Confederates have captured off Cedar Keys, belonging to Key West. Capt. Legarde reports that a large number of troops arrived at Ship Island on the 4th. The steamship Constitution arrived with the 17th and 26th Massachusetts regiments, and a regiment from Connecticut--2,600 men in all; and on the day he left, the transport ships Great Republic, King Fisher, and New World, arrived with 2,000 more, and general cargoes of army supplies; also, the steam transports Connecticut, and Atlantic, with two regiments from Massachusetts and one from Maine. The forces on the island, when he left, were about 8,000 men, and 30,000 more troops were exp