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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 1,873 1,873 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 79 79 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 66 66 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 50 50 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 36 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 29 29 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 28 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 26 26 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 23 23 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for 5th or search for 5th in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), First expeditions of the Federal Navy (search)
reat vigor. The Pawnee had joined the squadron, every vessel of which had been hit more than once, but although Commander Ward relates that more than a thousand shot had been discharged within range, he had no damage to report, which was, as he wrote, truly remarkable, and later in the war, when gunnery practice had improved, it would have been impossible. Again, on the 2d of June, the Pawnee attacked the batteries, and though struck a number of times, had no casualties to report. On the 5th, the steamer Harriet Lane, of historic memory, attacked the Confederate batteries at Pig Point, near Hampton Roads, and Captain John Faunce, while bearing testimony to the gallant conduct of the officers and men under his command, regretfully announced that he had five casualties on board his little vessel. On the 27th of June, the navy lost its first officer and it was no other than the gallant Commander Ward, of the Freeborn, who was shot and mortally wounded while in the act of sighting
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The actions with the forts (search)
her a slight blow. At the same moment the commanders of the two vessels recognized each other and passed a friendly hail. For over an hour the one-sided fight had been maintained. The Tennessee had lost two killed and nine wounded, and the Union fleet, in passing the forts and in the subsequent actions with the gunboats and the ram, had fifty-two killed and one hundred and seventy wounded. There were ninety-three lost by the sinking of the Tecumseh. Fort Powell had been evacuated on the 5th, and Fort Gaines did not long survive the catastrophe to Buchanan's fleet. The siege was pressed, and the Confederates, appreciating that resistance was useless, asked for a truce to arrange terms of surrender. The arrangements were made on the 7th, and the surrender took place on the 8th. The next day, General Granger moved his command, reenforced by three new regiments, across the bay, landing at Navy Cove, four miles from Fort Morgan, on the bay side of Mobile Point. Each succeeding