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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 1,873 1,873 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 79 79 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 66 66 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 50 50 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 36 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 29 29 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 28 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 26 26 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 23 23 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for 5th or search for 5th in all documents.

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the brigade, in conjunction with other troops, and the enemy were found to occupy the first line of works, built by General Steedman near Raine's house. Each day the enemy was driven from the left of these works with slight loss to us. On the fifth, one lieutenant and seven enlisted men of the enemy were captured by this brigade. A citizen living near the Murfreesboro pike, was killed by a member of B company, Sixteenth United States colored infantry. The report of Colonel Gaw concerning catur, having destroyed the pontoon and another of the enemy's trains. On arriving at Courtland, found that the General commanding, with the First division, had gone to Decatur, orders having been left for me to follow with my command. On the fifth, moved to within four miles of Decatur, where I received orders to move with my old command (the Second brigade colored troops) to Nashville, Tennessee. On the sixth of January, moved to the terminus of the railroad opposite Decatur, and waite
I wrote, viz.: He is now removing the blockade and obstructions, some six miles below Kinston, for the purpose of bringing the ram and boat flotilla to this city. The ram in the Roanoke is expected to be in condition to co-operate. The one at Kinston is virtually completed, and on the first flood will come down. They are so confident of success in the Neuse, that General Pickett will not delay for the one at Halifax. March seventh, I wrote, viz.: Colonel McChesney, on the fifth, states, that all the contrabands agree that there is a large force at Kinston, and also at Greenville, and that the obstructions below Kinston are being removed. March twelfth, I wrote, viz.: He states that some four hundred men were put to work on the gunboat by Pickett on his return, with instructions to complete her as soon as possible, and before the fourteenth, the anniversary of the fall of Newbern. The boat is virtually done, and two additional guns for her arrived last Tu
I wrote, viz.: He is now removing the blockade and obstructions, some six miles below Kinston, for the purpose of bringing the ram and boat flotilla to this city. The ram in the Roanoke is expected to be in condition to co-operate. The one at Kinston is virtually completed, and on the first flood will come down. They are so confident of success in the Neuse, that General Pickett will not delay for the one at Halifax. March seventh, I wrote, viz.: Colonel McChesney, on the fifth, states, that all the contrabands agree that there is a large force at Kinston, and also at Greenville, and that the obstructions below Kinston are being removed. March twelfth, I wrote, viz.: He states that some four hundred men were put to work on the gunboat by Pickett on his return, with instructions to complete her as soon as possible, and before the fourteenth, the anniversary of the fall of Newbern. The boat is virtually done, and two additional guns for her arrived last Tu
from pillage and destruction. He promptly engaged and defeated them, driving them to Hancock and across the Potomac. I commend the homeless and ruined people of Chambersburg to the liberal benevolence of the Legislature, and suggest that a sufficient appropriation be made for their relief. Similar charity has been heretofore exercised, in the case of an accidental and destructive fire at Pittsburg. And I cannot doubt the disposition of the Legislature on the present occasion. On the fifth day of the month a large rebel army was in Maryland, and at various points on the Potomac as far west as New Creek; and as there was no adequate force within the State, I deemed it my duty on that day to call for thirty thousand volunteer militia for domestic protection. They will be armed, transported and supplied by the United States, but as no provision is made for their payment, it will be necessary, should you approve my action, to make an appropriation for that purpose. Feeling i
cted with the fond hope that we would again fling upon it our infantry. On the morning of the fifth, the Twenty-third corps had been fully put in the rear (in reserve) of the forward movement of trks, and retreated toward the Chattahoochee river. Pursuit was made early in the morning of the fifth, my division leading the Fourth corps, and such was the vigor of the pursuit on the road we folle proximity to the enemy, daily losing some men in the picket encounters, till Monday night, the fifth, when it was quietly and successfully withdrawn. By easy stages, unembarrassed by the enemy, thhole line. General Reiley's brigade of General Cox's division, General Schofield's army, on the fifth, tried to break through the enemy's line about a mile below Utoy creek, but failed to carry the ure, I gave orders on the fourth for the Army to prepare to move back slowly to Atlanta. On the fifth we drew back to the vicinty of Jonesboroa, five miles, where we remained a day. On the seventh w
from what they abandoned and what they left, could not be less than fifteen killed and twenty-five wounded. Doctor Prentiss, of the First Kansas colored volunteers, arrived at Roseville next day, from General Steele's army, and took charge of the wounded. It was a fortunate circumstance, as the Assistant-Surgeon of the Sixth, Doctor S. A. Fairchild, sent with an escort from this place, was most inhumanly butchered, after capture, by bushwhackers. Doctor Fairchild left Fort Smith on the fifth, with an escort of twenty-six men, under Lieutenant McKibben, of the Sixth. Twenty-five miles south of this place it was reported that, the day before, one hundred rebels passed through Charlestown. They passed a recently abandoned post about six miles further, and three miles further on, at the farm of a well-known bushwhacker, they were fired upon by about fifty men, stationed in a ravine. At the same time a large force was seen on each side of the road, endeavoring to surround the escor
nd ably-commanded army, and how so large a train was to be carried through a hostile country and protected. Early on the fifth, the advance corps (the Fifth, Major-General G. K. Warren commanding), met and engaged the enemy outside his intrenchmenthousand cavalry, under General Kautz, from Suffolk, to operate against the road south of Petersburg and Richmond. On the fifth he occupied, without opposition, both City Point and Bermuda Hundred, his movement being a complete surprise. On the six a million and a half dollars' worth of stores and property on the levee and in storehouses was consumed by fire. On the fifth the enemy disappeared and crossed to the north side of the Tennessee river, above Johnsonville, moving toward Clifton, ande, who reached there the next day. General Ord reached Burkesville on the evening of the fifth. On the morning of the fifth, I addressed Major-General Sherman the following communication: Wilson's Station, April 5, 1865. General: All in
n the morning of the fifth the enemy again opened fire on the garrison, and after a furious cannonade of more than an hour's duration, withdrew from his position across the river and disappeared. He crossed the Tennessee above Johnsonville by means of two large flatboats constructed by his men, and two small boats belonging to one of the gunboats, and then moved off in the direction of Clifton. Major-General Schofield, with the advance of the Twenty third corps, arrived in Nashville on the fifth, and was immediately started toward Johnsonville by rail, reaching that place the same night, and finding the enemy had already retreated. Directions were then sent General Schofield to leave a sufficiently strong force for the defence of that post, and with the balance of his command proceed to carry out the instructions already given him, namely, to join the Fourth corps at Pulaski, and assume command of all the troops in the vicinity, watch the movements of Hood, and retard his advance i
You are particularly enjoined to allow no foraging by your men. It is demoralizing in the extreme, and is apt to make open enemies where they would not otherwise exist. U. S. Grant, Brigadier-General Colonel J. B. Plummer, Eleventh Missouri volunteers, commanding Cape Girardean, was directed to send one regiment in the direction of Bloomfield, with a view of attracting the attention of the enemy. The forces under Colonel Oglesby were all got off on the evening of the third. On the fifth, a telegram was received from headquarters, St. Louis, stating that the enemy was reinforcing Price's army from Columbus by way of White river, and directing that the demonstration that had been ordered against Columbus be immediately made. Orders were accordingly at once given to the troops under my command that remained at Cairo, Bird's Point, and Fort Holt. A letter was also sent to Brigadier-General C. F. Smith, commanding at Paducah, requesting him to make a demonstration at the same
Doc. 49. expedition to Tupelo, Mississippi General Mower's report. headquarters First division, Sixteenth Army corps, Memphis, Tennessee, July 27, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by my division on the late expedition to Tupelo, Mississippi: I left La Grange on the morning of the fifth instant with my command, which was composed of the following brigades and batteries: First brigade, Colonel McMillen, Ninety-fifth Ohio volunteer infantry; Second brigade, Colonel Wilken, Ninth Minnesota volunteer infantry; Third brigade, Colonel Woods, Twelfth Iowa volunteer infantry; Fourth brigade, Colonel Ward, Fourteenth Wisconsin volunteer infantry. This brigade was a detachment from the Seventeenth Army Corps, temporarily assigned to my command. Second Iowa battery, Lieutenant Reid commanding; First Illinois, company E (one section), Lieutenant Cram; and a battery, four Rodmans, belonging to company M, First Missouri, but manned by
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