hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 2,913 2,913 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 56 56 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 43 43 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 42 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 35 35 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 34 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 33 33 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 22 22 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 21 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 20 20 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for 6th or search for 6th in all documents.

Your search returned 43 results in 36 document sections:

1 2 3 4
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
he battle of the Wilderness was renewed by us at 5 o'clock on the morning of the 6th, and continued with unabated fury until darkness set in, each army holding subst City Point and Bermuda Hundred, his movement being a complete surprise. On the 6th he was in position with his main army and commenced intrenching. On the 7th he ding at Harper's Ferry, crossed the river and occupied Maryland Heights. On the 6th the enemy occupied Hagerstown, moving a strong column toward Frederick City. Gens. I remained at Monocacy until General Sheridan arrived, on the morning of the 6th, and after a conference with him in relation to military affairs in that vicinitommanding officer. The expedition sailed from Fort Monroe on the morning of the 6th, arriving on the rendezvous, off Beaufort, on the 8th, where, owing to the diffiay caused him to abandon the idea of capturing Lynchburg. On the morning of the 6th, dividing his force into two columns, he sent one to Scottsville, whence it marc
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
lry to move on Howard's left; Kilpatrick's division of cavalry was stationed at Ringgold, picketing toward Tunnel Hill, and patrolling on Palmer's right flank; Garrard's division was detached and operating under instructions from Major-General McPherson, commanding the Army of the Tennessee. The army got into position by the 5th, and stood as above directed, communication having been fully established from the right to the left of the whole command. According to instructions given on the 6th, the army moved on Tunnel Hill at daylight on the 7th in three columns-Palmer's corps on the direct road from Ringgold, Howard's via Lee's house, and Hooker's via Nickajack Gap and Trickum. The enemy made some show of resistance in Palmer's front, but evacuated Tunnel Hill on the appearance of Howard's column on his flank, and fled toward Buzzard Roost, our troops occupying Tunnel Hill Ridge. Palmer's command was then moved forward and took position on Howard's right along the ridge, and bo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 18 (search)
enemy evacuated his line. Cruft's brigade was started back to Kingston as escort to the wagon train of the corps on the 30th. On the night of the 3d of June we relieved half of Davis' front on the left of this division. Our time was constantly employed, whilst in this position, in pushing out works, by successive advances, close to the enemy; and a constant fire of musketry and artillery was kept up whenever we could annoy the enemy. The 5th we lay in camp near New Hope Church. On the 6th the division moved on the Acworth road to the vicinity of Morris Hill Chapel. The division remained in position at Morris Hill until the morning of the 10th, when, moving through the lines of the Twentieth Corps, on the Marietta road, we soon struck the pickets of the enemy. Pushing forward, the enemy was found in force, with an intrenched line extending across the summit of Pine Top Mountain. The division was formed facing this line of the enemy and intrenched in full view and under easy
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 21 (search)
aving retired during the night of the 1st, we advanced on the morning of the 2d and followed him until 4 p. m., when he was found strongly intrenched. This regiment was then deployed as skirmishers and placed on the left flank. We remained in this position until early day on the morning of the 3d, when we joined the brigade and remained until the 4th, when we moved to the rear about one-fourth mile. On the 5th at night-fall we moved to the rear and arrived at Jonesborough at 1 a. m. of the 6th, where we remained until the 7th, when we marched toward Atlanta, halting for the night within seven miles of the city. On the 8th we marched toward Atlanta, which we passed through at 11 a. m. that day, and moved to our present position, about one and a half miles east of town, arriving here at 12 m., remaining here since, my loss in killed being 1; wounded, 15; captured, 5; total, 21. The condition of this command in arms is good, in clothing is fair, in discipline fair, in spirits go
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 26 (search)
rough Jonesborough, and came up with enemy two miles south of the town. Our division moved to the left through a broken country and came upon the enemy's right about night-fall. While in this position the enemy shelled our lines with some effect. The regiment had 1 man wounded. The same evening the Thirty-fifth supported the skirmish line, and on the following morning went into position on the left of the Forty-fifth Ohio in the front line. Remained in this position until the night of September 5, when agreeable to orders we quietly withdrew, moved back to Jonesborough, going into camp about 3 a. m. 6th instant. The following day moved to Rough and Ready, some ten miles from Jonesborough. Arrived in Atlanta on the 8th, and moving about one and a half miles northwest of town went into camp. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, A. G. Tassin, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding. Capt. H. F. Temple, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Brigade.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 37 (search)
ly. That night the enemy evacuated their position at Kenesaw Mountain, and on the 3d the brigade marched with the division through Marietta and bivouacked near the railroad about four miles south of that place. During the day of the 4th of July my command was engaged in hotly skirmishing with the enemy, who retired during the night, and on the 5th the march was continued to Vining's Station, near which place my command was bivouacked between the railroad and the Chattahoochee River. On the 6th the division was moved to a position along the southerly bank of the Rottenwood Creek, where I was bivouacked on the left of the line, and there remained until the 9th; on that day my brigade marched to Roswell Factory, forded the Chattahoochee River, and intrenched in a position on the south side of it, where the command remained until the 11th, when, being relieved by a part of the Sixteenth Army Corps, I was ordered by you to recross the river and bivouacked on the north side. On the 12th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 47 (search)
while we remained at this place, but nothing of moment occurred from this time till the night of the 4th of June, when the enemy evacuated his position in our front. It was while lying at our position near New Hope Church, on the 30th of May, that Capt. John A. Burrell, of the Onehundredth Illinois Volunteers, a brave and efficient officer, was killed by a musket-shot, the ball passing directly through his body, while on duty with his command on the skirmish line. On the morning of the 6th instant, in accordance with orders, I moved my command from my position near New Hope Church to the left, some six miles in an easterly direction, to Morris' Hill Church, going into camp on the right of General Harker's brigade, about two miles from Acworth. Here the command rested until the morning of the 10th instant, when I moved forward some four miles, and formed line of battle on General Kimball's right, confronting the enemy, who occupied a strongly intrenched position on Pine Mountain.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 50 (search)
Brig. Gen. C. G. Harker-left Cleveland, Tenn., with the division at 1 p. m. May 3, 1864, marched to Red Clay, ten miles, and camped. We broke camp at 6 a. in. of the 4th, marched about twelve miles, halted at 3 p. m., and went into camp about dark near Catoosa Springs. On the morning of the 5th instant we adjusted our lines and built a strong line of earth-works. The Forty-second Illinois Infantry and Sixty-fifth Ohio Infantry joined the brigade on return from veteran furlough on the 6th instant, and we remained in the same position until the morning of the 7th instant, when we marched for Tunnel Hill, reaching camp near that place about 3 p. m. The brigade numbered to-day 2,325 muskets. On the morning of the 8th we marched at 6 a. m., and halted about one and a half miles out, near the mountain named as Rocky Face. General Harker directed Colonel Opdycke, One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio Infantry, to scale the side of the mountain and try and effect a lodgment on the ridge, s
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 63 (search)
ggregate loss, 203. During the night of the 27th we went into position with the brigade and fortified; remained in the position during the days of the 28th and 29th, and on the evening of the 30th advanced our line nearer the enemy and fortified. Remained in this position until June 4, alternating with the Eighty-ninth Illinois Volunteers on the first line, meeting with no loss. On the morning of the 5th it was discovered that the enemy had evacuated their position in our front. On the 6th marched with the column to camp near Acworth, a distance of eight miles, where we remained to recuperate our wasted energies until the 10th, when the army resumed offensive operations, and on the 12th went into position in front of Pine Top Mountain. The work [sic] nothing was done until the morning of the 14th, when the brigade and division advanced about one mile, finding the enemy in strong works; the position of the regiment in brigade on this day being the right of the first line, with
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 67 (search)
at Kingston on the 19th. The Fifty-ninth Regiment, the advance of the corps, skirmished with the enemy in strong force on the road. from Kingston to Cassville until night. During the night he again retreated. On the 23d we marched from Cassville, crossed the Etowah River, and on the 25th we again confronted the enemy near Dallas. Until the night of the 5th of June we were building works and skirmishing constantly in the presence of the enemy, when he again abandoned his position. On the 6th we moved to Acworth, and on the 10th moved forward untii the enemy was found strongly posted on Pine Top, in front of which the regiment threw up rifle-pits. On the 15th the enemy abandoned Pine Top, which we immediately occupied. The regiment worked all the night of the 16th, under a furious fire from the enemy, building rifle-pits close to his works, but when day broke he again fell back. We followed him up and soon developed him in another line of works. On the evening of the 20th
1 2 3 4