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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 2,913 2,913 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 56 56 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 43 43 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 42 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 35 35 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 34 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 33 33 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 22 22 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 21 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 20 20 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War. You can also browse the collection for 6th or search for 6th in all documents.

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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 1 (search)
ult., in reference to your position at Harper's Ferry. The difficulties which surround it have been felt from the beginning of its occupation, and I am aware of the obstacles to its maintenance with your present force. Every effort has been made to remove them, and will be continued. But, with similar necessities pressing on every side, you need not be informed of the difficulty of providing against them. . . . And in that of the 7th: I have had the honor to receive your letter of the 6th inst. The importance of the subject has induced me to lay it before the President, that he may be informed of your views. He places great value upon the retention of the command of the Shenandoah Valley, and the position at Harper's Ferry. The evacuation of the latter would interrupt our communication with Maryland, and injure our cause in that State.... The objects of the Confederate Government, expressed in these letters, were not to be accomplished by the concentration of its forces at H
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 4 (search)
the language of his letter indicated. In writing to the President on the 22d of February, I had requested him to have the assignment of officers of engineers expedited; such an assignment had been applied for early in the month. Captain Powhatan Robinson reported to me, with three or four lieutenants, in the first two or three days of March. He was directed, with his party, to examine the two roads leading from our camps to the Rappahannock near the railroad-bridge. He reported, on the 6th, that they were practicable, but made difficult by deep mud. On the 7th he was sent to the Rappahannock, to have the railroad-bridge made practicable for wagons. We had to regard four routes to Richmond as practicable for the Federal army: that chosen in the previous July; another east of the Potomac to the mouth of Potomac Creek, and thence by Fredericksburg; the third and fourth by water, the one to the Lower Rappahannock, the other to Fort Monroe; and from those points respectively by
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
nd then returning from furlough. He fixed his headquarters at Enterprise, where Hebert's and Baldwin's brigades had been ordered to assemble. Being summoned by the judge-advocate, Major Barton, to attend the court of inquiry, to be held in Atlanta, in relation to the loss of Vicksburg and Port Hudson, I set out for that place in the evening of the 2d of September, but stopped in Montgomery in consequence of intelligence received there that its time of meeting had been postponed. On the 6th, while still there, I received a dispatch from General Bragg, asking that a division of infantry might be hurried to Atlanta, to save that depot and give him time to defeat the enemy's plans. Lieutenant-General Hardee was immediately requested to send Gregg's and McNair's brigades from Meridian and Enterprise to Atlanta, and to replace them at those points by Featherston's and Adams's. This movement was begun the following night. When it became evident that Atlanta was in no danger, the two
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 12 (search)
ragg's command near Goldsboroa, and supposed to amount to six or eight thousand men. Leaving General Beauregard to protect the line of railroad from Charlotte to Danville, and to send the troops of the Army of Tennessee, as they arrived, to Smithfield by railroad, I transferred my headquarters, on the 4th, from Charlotte to Fayetteville, considering the latter as a better point to obtain quick intelligence of the enemy's movements, and to direct those of the Confederate troops. On the 6th General Bragg, then at Goldsboroa, informed me that the enemy was approaching Kinston in heavy force, and was then but nine miles from the place. He suggested that the troops just arrived at Smithfield from Charlotte could join him in a few hours, and that such a reinforcement might enable him to win a victory. Major-General D. H. Hill, who commanded the troops referred to, was, for the object in view, placed under General Bragg's orders. The troops were united at Kinston on the 7th. Cla
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 14 (search)
st of the topographical corps reported to me afterward. As regards the efficiency of the party, Lieutenant Heinrichs and myself were the only ones who had any experience in sketching topography, and, this being our first essay in the military line, we were ridiculously minute, and consequently very slow. I left Manassas March 3d, on my reconnaissance to the Rappahannock; I taking the upper route, and sending Lieutenant Randolph, who had just reported, by the lower. I reported to you on the 6th, at Centreville; received orders on the 7th to prepare Rappahannock Bridge for the passage of trains. The bridge was completed Tuesday morning (11th), just as the trains came up. In the consultation, the President seemed to think that the army was exposed, and desired its removal. I thought the object of change of position ought to be, facility of uniting all our forces promptly, when McClellan's designs should be developed. It terminated with informal verbal orders to me to fall back
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
d and brave heart left me no apology for interference. For details of the action, see the accompanying reports. Our wounded, and many of those of the enemy, were placed in hospitals and residences in Williamsburg. Major-General Smith's division reached Barhamsville, eighteen miles; and Major-General Magruder's (commanded by Brigadier-General D. R. Jones) the Diascund Bridge on the Chickahominy road on that day. Those of Longstreet and Hill marched from Williamsburg, twelve miles, on the 6th. On that evening Major-General Smith reported that the enemy's troops were landing in force on the south side of York River, near West Point. On the following morning the army was concentrated near Barhamsville. In the mean time it had been ascertained that the enemy occupied a thick and extensive wood between Barhamsville and their landing-place. Brigadier-General Whiting was directed by General Smith to dislodge him, which was handsomely done-the brigade of Hood, and part of that of Ham
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Report of Hon. L. T. Wigfall in the Senate of the Confederate States, march 18, 1865. (search)
at General Hood over-estimated General Johnston's forces at and near Dalton by twenty-five thousand and eighty-seven men. If General Hood, by the term at and near Dalton, refers to the forces after this date received by General Johnston from General Polk, he is again in error as to numbers. It was not till the 4th of May that General Polk was ordered to move with Loring's division and other available force at your command, to Rome, Georgia, and thence unite with General Johnston. On the 6th, the day on which General Hood says this army lay at and near Dalton, waiting the advance of the enemy, General Polk telegraphs to General Cooper from Demopolis: My troops are concentrating and moving as directed. On the 10th, at Rome, he telegraphs the President: The first of Loring's brigade arrived and sent forward to Resaca; the second just in; the third will arrive to-morrow morning. . . . French's brigade was to leave Blue Mountain this morning. The others will follow in succession; F