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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 2,913 2,913 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 56 56 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 43 43 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 42 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 35 35 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 34 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 33 33 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 22 22 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 21 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 20 20 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for 6th or search for 6th in all documents.

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ame in the Stockdale, with iron, etc., for the repairs of our vessel. On the afternoon of the sixth, the Chickasaw went down and shelled Fort Gaines, and on the morning of the seventh I received a. S. flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864. sir: In obedience to your order of the sixth instant, I respectfully submit the following report of damages to the rigging of this ship during an of Fort Powell, exchanging several shot, and being struck three times. On the morning of the sixth, I proceeded again to Fort Powell, which I found deserted and blown up. I towed out another barging Squadron, August 16, 1864. sir: I have the honor to inform the Department that on the sixth instant I ordered a survey to be made of the hull, armor, etc., of the iron-clad Tennessee, and I hep Richmond, inside of Mobile Bay, August 13, 1864. sir: In obedience to your order of the sixth instant, hereto appended, we have the honor respectfully to report that we have made a strict and ca
re loss, and our forces moved up the East-Tennessee and Virginia Railroad, Willcox's division stopping at Greenville, the former home of Andy Johnson, and Shackleford's occupying Jonesboro. Every thing remained quiet until the twenty-eighth ult., when Shackleford was flanked by the enemy, and forced to fall back on Greenville. Next day, however, the rebels retreated, and Shackleford moved up to his former position. The enemy's attitude remained threatening, and on the morning of the sixth instant, heavy firing was heard in the direction of Rogersville, a small town situated on the north bank of the Holston River. A detachment of the Third Indiana cavalry was immediately sent out to learn the result, and toward evening sent in a courier with the intelligence that our forces at Rogersville, consisting of the Second Tennessee and Seventh Ohio cavalry, and Second Illinois battery, had been defeated, and that the enemy was reported moving on Bull's Gap, eighteen miles in our rear. T
, who also sent a cavalry force across the Tennessee, above Chattanooga, which destroyed a large wagon train in the Sequatchie Valley, captured McMinsville and other points on the railroad, thus almost completely cutting off the supplies of General Rosecrans's army. Fortunately for us, the line of the railroad was well defended, and the enemy's cavalry being successfully attacked by Colonel McCook, at Anderson's Cross-Roads, on the second October; by General Mitchell, at Shelbyville, on the sixth; and by General Crook, at Farmington, on the eighth, were mostly captured or destroyed. Major-General Grant arrived at Louisville, and on the nineteenth, in accordance with the orders of the President, assumed general command of the Departments of the Tennessee, Cumberland, and Ohio. In accordance with his recommendation, Major-General G. W. Thomas was placed in the immediate command of the department of the Cumberland, and Major-General Sherman of that of the Tennessee. As the supply
ch to the relief of Burnside. General Elliot had been ordered by Thomas, on the twenty-sixth of November, to proceed from Alexandria, Tennessee, to Knoxville, with his cavalry division, to aid in the relief of that place. The approach of Sherman caused Longstreet to raise the siege of Knoxville and retreat eastward on the night of the fourth of December. Sherman succeeded in throwing his cavalry into Knoxville on the night of the third. Sherman arrived in person at Knoxville on the sixth, and after a conference with Burnside in reference to t organizing a pursuing force large enough to overtake the enemy and beat him, or drive him out of the State, Burnside was of the opinion that the corps of Granger, in conjunction with his own command, was sufficient for that purpose, and on the seventh addressed to Sherman the following communication: Knoxville, Dec. 7, 1863. To Major-General Sherman: I desire to express to you and your command my most hearty thanks and gratitud
beef is concerned. In regard to bacon, the stock is about exhausted-hence beef is our only hope. I know the prospect is very discouraging, and it only remains with those of us having charge of this most important work to do all we can to exhaust our resources; and when we have done this, our country cannot complain of us. If we fail to do all that can be done, and our cause shall fail, upon us will rest the responsibility; therefore let us employ every means at our command. Again, on the sixth, he says: Major A. can explain to you the great and absolute necessity for prompt action in the matter; for, Major, I assure you, that nearly all now depends on you. And on the nineteenth of October, he says: Captain Townsend, A. C.S., having a leave of absence for thirty days from the army of Tennessee, I have prevailed on him to see you and explain to you my straitened condition, and the imminent danger of our army suffering for the want of beef. And on the twentieth October, he wrote: T
Doc. 64.-operations in New-Mexico. camp Florilla, near Fort Canby, N. M., January 26, 1864. The cumminating point in this expedition has been reached at last by the very successful operations of our troops at Cañon de Chelly. Colonel Kit Carson left Fort Canby on the sixth instant, with a command of four hundred men, twenty of whom were mounted. He had a section of mountain artillery with him, and taking the road via Puebla, Colorado, he started for Cañion de Chelly. He gave orders to Captain Pheiffer, with his command of one hundred men, to enter the cañon at the east opening, while he himself intended to enter it at the mouth, or west opening, and by this movement he expected that both columns would meet in the cañon on the second day, as it was supposed to be forty miles in length. Captain Pheiffer's party proceeded two days through the cañon, fighting occasionally; but although the Indians frequently fired on them from the rocky walls above, the balls were spent l
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 87.-the campaign in Florida. (search)
e same company, and about to take a command in another regiment now forming in Massachusetts, volunteered his services to the expedition and was with his company to-day. Every thing thus far has gone on in the most prosperous manner. The State abounds in cattle, and provisions are not scarce. Jacksonville, Fla., Sunday, February 14, 1864. I have already noticed in a previous letter the safe arrival at Jacksonville of the troops forming the expedition which left Hilton Head on the sixth instant, for Florida. I now propose to chronicle the events which have occurred in this region since the landing. Prudential reasons deter me from giving the numerical strength of the force. Commencing from the eighth instant, I will state that the troops which had disembarked on the previous day left their camping-ground at three P. M., and proceeded toward the interior of the State. The force was divided into three columns, commanded respectively by Colonel Barton, Colonel Hawley, and Colo
ave drawn the main body of the enemy to Morton's Ford; while at Raccoon Ford but comparatively a small body was observable on the opposite bank of the river. Our total loss is covered by two hundred, but a small proportion being among the killed. Nearly one hundred rebel prisoners were sent to headquarters this morning. General Owen's official report. headquarters Third brigade, Third division, Second corps, February 8, 1864. I have the honor to report that on Saturday, the sixth instant, at seven o'clock, I marched my command in the direction of Morton's Ford, in accordance with orders received about three hours previous to that time. I arrived at the headquarters of the cavalry reserve within half a mile of the ford, at ten o'clock A. M., and halted. At thirty-five minutes past ten, I received orders to cross the river, which I succeeded in doing, and pushed the enemy back about half a mile; and then, under orders not to press the enemy too hard, but to skirmish with
We had no idea of driving the enemy out of the town when we made the demonstration. We were expecting reinforcements from Liverpool; which had been sent for, and we wanted to keep them busy until they arrived. As soon as the enemy retreated out of the town, those attacking the fort gradually fell back, till out of cover of the bluffs, when they broke and ran, our boys having opened a heavy fire upon them. Thus ended our fight at Yazoo City. A second flag of truce was sent on the sixth instant, from Brigadier-General Richardson to Colonel Coates, stating that he had sent an ambulance surgeon and ambulance corps to bury his dead, and take care of the wounded, and proposing to Colonel Coates that each of them send a commissioner between the picket-lines to effect an exchange of prisoners, etc. The first point was answered that his dead had been decently buried, his wounded properly and tenderly cared for, consequently no necessity for his surgeon, etc., and declined receiving th
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 120.-operations in Western Virginia. (search)
Doc. 120.-operations in Western Virginia. Charlestown, Va., Jan. 8, 1864. At an early hour on the morning of the sixth instant, Colonel Boyd, commanding the cavalry brigade at Charlestown, started with his entire command and a section of artillery, for the purpose of reconnoitring the enemy's force and position. For some days past considerable excitement had prevailed relative to the intentions of Imboden and Early, and an attack upon Martinsburgh was considered imminent, until the timely arrival of General Averill restored confidence in our ability to resist and repel the enemy, in case such attack were made. In the mean time, however, Imboden had remained stationary in the vicinity of Winchester, and it was considered advisable to feel his actual strength and force him to fall back to his old quarters. He seemed to have anticipated this plan of ours, for when our cavalry reached Winchester, he made a retrograde movement in the direction of Strasburgh. Accordingly, our
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