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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 185 185 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 47 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 46 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 44 44 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 37 37 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 25 25 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 24 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 24 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for 7th or search for 7th in all documents.

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
roads south of Petersburg and Richmond. On the 5th he occupied, without opposition, both City Point and Bermuda Hundred, his movement being a complete surprise. On the 6th he was in position with his main army and commenced intrenching. On the 7th he made a reconnaissance against the Petersburg and Richmond Railroad, destroying a portion of it after some fighting. On the 9th he telegraphed as follows: headquarters, Near Bermuda Landing, May 9, 1864. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of Warnd and the Shenandoah Valley and Lynchburg, and when the cavalry got well off to move the army to the south side of the James River, by the enemy's right flank, where I felt I could cut off all his sources of supply except by the canal. On the 7th two divisions of cavalry, under General Sheridan, got off on the expedition against the Virginia Central Railroad with instructions to Hunter, whom I hoped he would meet near Charlottesville, to join his forces to Sheridan's, and afber the work la
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
fall on the enemy's flank when he retreated, as I judged he would. During the movement General Thomas was to make a strong feint of attack in front, while General Schofield pressed down from the north. Generals Thomas moved from Ringgold on the 7th, occupying Tunnel Hill, facing the Buzzard Roost Gap, meeting with little opposition, and pushing the enemy's cavalry well through the gap. General McPherson reached Snake Creek Gap on the 8th, completely surprising a brigade of cavalry which was sue our enemy in that wooded country with a view to his capture, I gave orders on the 4th for the army to prepare to move back slowly to Atlanta. On the 5th we drew back to the vicinity of Jonesborough, five miles, where we remained a day. On the 7th we moved to Rough and Ready, seven miles, and the next day to the camps selected, viz, the Army of the Cumberland grouped around about Atlanta, the Army of the Tennessee about East Point, and that of the Ohio at Decatur, where the men now occupy c
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 9 (search)
al interruptions of our railroad communications, were we without a good supply. Great credit is due Lieut. Col. G. W. Schofield, chief of ordnance, Army of the Ohio; Capt. D. H. Buel, chief of ordnance, Army of the Tennessee; Lieut. O. E. Michaelis, acting chief of ordnance, Army of the Cumberland, and Capts. E. F. Townsend, S. H. Hogan, and S. W. Armstrong, in charge of ordnance depots, for zeal and efficiency in the discharge of their duties. Capt. D. H. Buel was captured on the 7th instant, near Rough and Ready, bringing a dispatch from Major-General Howard to you, by a scouting party of Jackson's cavalry. It was very unfortunate to be taken prisoner just at the close of the campaign, when our army was marching to occupy Atlanta, the object and result of its four months operations. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, T. G. Baylor, Capt. and Chief of Ordnance, Mil. Div. of the Miss. Maj. Gen. W. T. Sherman, Comdg. Military Division of the Mississippi. Incl
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 16 (search)
he engagement, but gave no support to our movement. The loss in Knefler's brigade was quite severe, including the dangerously wounding of Colonel Manderson, Nineteenth Ohio, and Lieutenant-Colonel Bailey, Ninth Kentucky, and the killing of Captain Miller, assistant adjutant-general of the brigade. We remained in our position confronting the enemy until the night of the 5th, when the troops were withdrawn, falling back to Jonesborough. Remained in bivouac at Jonesborough the 6th. On the 7th fell back to the vicinity of Rough and Ready, and on the 8th marched to our present camp east of Atlanta. In concluding this report I take pleasure in recommending to the favorable consideration of the commander of the department the division commanders of this corps, Generals Newton, Wood, and Kimball; quick and ready to comprehend, they were always zealous and careful to carry out promptly all my directions. I believe they all most honestly deserve promotion. General Wood especially,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 19 (search)
ced to within 500 yards of the enemy's intrenchments under a terrible fire of shell and canister from his guns, where a position was taken and works thrown up; in this advance I captured 30 prisoners and severely punished the enemy. My command remained in this position, skirmishing continually with both musketry and artillery, until the 5th of September, when the command was withdrawn and my division bivouacked in their old position near Jonesborough, and remained until the morning of the 7th, when the march was taken up for Atlanta, which place was reached at noon the 8th, without any incident worthy of notice. My division was put in position on the easterly side of the Augusta railroad, where it is now encamped. The loss of the division since August 4, the date of my assuming command, is 30 killed, 241 wounded, 18 missing. Total, 289. I respectfully refer you to the reports of my subordinate officers for special mention of those entitled to favorable consideration for t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 21 (search)
of June, 1864. On the 4th we marched from Kingston at 4 p. m., as guard to supply train. That evening we marched eight miles and halted at ] 1 p. m. at the village of Etowah, on the bank of the Euharlee Creek. On the 5th we moved but slowly, on account of bad roads, and halted at Raccoon Creek. On the morning of the 6th we moved at 6 a. m., crossed the creek and began the ascent of Allatoona Mountain, camping near Burnt Hickory at 11 p. m., having marched since dark by torchlight. On the 7th we marched at sunrise, crossing Pumpkin Vine Creek at 9 a. m. On the 8th we joined the First Division, Fourth Army Corps, near Acworth, Ga., remaining until the 10th, when we moved to the front five companies, deployed as skirmishers, under command of Major Calloway. At about 1 p. m. the skirmishers became engaged with the enemy, and continued warmly engaged throughout the day, the enemy hotly contesting every foot of ground, the Twenty-first losing 2 men wounded. On the 11th we threw up li
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 24 (search)
e night was rainy, and, except when the lightning flashed, it was impossible to see ten steps in advance. Owing to the rains of the 3d, 4th, and 5th instant, the roads were in a horrible condition, and the men actually waded for miles through mud knee-deep. It was a terrible night march, and the men, overcome with fatigue, straggled considerably. Near daylight in the morning we reached the position held on the night of the 1st instant, and here the brigade encamped until the morning of the 7th, when we marched in the direction and within eight miles of the city of Atlanta. On the 8th we marched through the streets of the city we had fought so hard and so long to possess, and proceeding two miles out on the Augusta railroad, we formed our line running parallel with it, facing south, and went into camp. Subjoined is a list of casualties of the brigade since I assumed command of it; also a list of prisoners captured. It affords me pleasure to acknowledge the valuable assistan
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 29 (search)
6 at 3 a. m. Owing to the darkness and great fatigue of my men, I asked permission of General Kimball to camp my command in front of the works built and occupied by my brigade on entering the town on September 1. It was granted, with instructions to occupy the works at early dawn, which was complied with. September 6, my command lay quiet all day, occupying the works; nothing unusual transpired. In the evening I received orders to have my command in readiness to move at 7 a. m. on the 7th instant. September 7, my command moved at 7 a. m. in the advance of the division, going into camp 3 p. m., near Rough and Ready Station. Nothing of note occurred during this day. In the evening I received orders to march at 7 a. m. on the morning of the 8th to Atlanta. September 8, my command moved at the hour appointed, following the First Brigade, Colonel Kirby. Arriving on the ground in rear of Atlanta, formerly occupied by a portion of the Army of the Tennessee, at 1 o'clock, I took positi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 30 (search)
fifth Illinois Volunteers in the recent campaign resulting in the capture of the city of Atlanta: On the morning of May 3, 1864, in obedience to the order of Col. William Grose, commanding brigade, this regiment marched from Blue Springs, Tenn., in the direction of Red Clay, Ga., at which place the command went into camp for the night. At 6 a. m. the next day moved toward Dalton, and in the afternoon formed line of battle and bivouacked near Catoosa Springs. Again, on the morning of the 7th, moved to Tunnel Hill, formed line of battle, and advanced upon the enemy, who were behind works, but they soon evacuated them, leaving our troops in possession of the town and works. At an early hour the next morning, May 8, this regiment advanced in front line down the valley, driving in the rebel skirmishers till within range of the enemy, who was strongly intrenched on Rocky Face Ridge. This regiment was only engaged occasionally at skirmishing till the morning of 13th of May, when it w
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 49 (search)
me skirmishing with the enemy and built works for defense. Loss in the skirmish 1 man. On the 5th marched to the Chattahoochee, near Vining's Stations Lieutenant- Colonel Squires returned from absent sick and took command of the regiment. On the 7th moved up the river about two miles, where the regiment was put on picket and remained until the 12th, while the most of the division went on a raid across the Chattahoochee. On the 13th crossed the Chattahoochee, advanced some two miles and went more or less to the fire of the rebel skirmish line and artillery until 8 p. m. of the 5th. Our loss while in front of Lovejoy's Station was 2 men mortally wounded. On the night of the 5th we fell back with the division to Jonesborough. On the 7th took up march for Atlanta, where we arrived on the 8th instant. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, N. T. Peatman, Major, Commanding Twenty-sixth Ohio Infantry. Lieut. L. L. Cox, Aide-de-Camp, Second Brig., Second Div., 4th Army C
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