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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 185 185 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 47 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 46 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 44 44 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 37 37 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 25 25 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 24 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 24 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for 7th or search for 7th in all documents.

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s not known. We were sorry when night came; we could have worried them out without any sacrifice on our part. We fired from our guns 95 rounds of shot and shell. There was very little firing from the musketry, as we could not get near their main body. Our men acted with the most perfect discipline. I have seen some of the best regiments in Europe in action; they cannot excel the coolness and intrepidity of our volunteers while surrounded with a superior force. I left Mount Vernon on the 7th, the second day after the battle. I carried despatches to Springfield on the 6th and returned, and on the Sunday left for St. Louis. I made the trip to Rolla, 154 miles from Mount Vernon, in twenty-nine hours. Met Gen. Sweeny three miles this side of Mount Vernon and Col. Brown thirty miles; the former with 500 men and the latter about 800. New York times' narrative. St. Louis, Wednesday, July 10, 1861. Our city was thrown into a state of feverish excitement to-day, by the news
hat House shall agree to pass the bill, it shall be sent, together with the objections, to the other House, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, and if approved by two-thirds of that House, it shall become a law. But in all such cases, the votes of both Houses shall be determined by yeas and nays, and the names of the persons voting for and against the bill shall be entered on the journal of each House respectively. If any bill shall not be returned by the President within ten days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to him, the same shall be a law, in like manner as if he had signed it, unless the Congress, by their adjournment, prevent its return; in which case it shall not be a law. The President may approve any appropriation and disapprove any other appropriation in the same bill. In such case he shall, in signing the bill, designate the appropriations disapproved; and shall return a copy of such appropriations, with his objections, to the House in which
Doc. 165.-the escape of the Sumter. United States steam-sloop Brooklyn, off mouth of the Mississippi River, Wednesday, July 10, 1861. Sunday last, the 7th inst., as the following will vividly show, was a day pregnant with misfortune for us. It was then the pirate Sumter escaped us, and that, too, by our own injudicious management. Now, as there is the greatest probability that this steamer, manned, as she is, by a band of cutthroats, will capture, rob, and sink, or burn some of our merchant vessels, laden with valuable cargoes, I imagine it will be nothing more than fair if the manner of her escape is put upon record in your journal; so here goes: At daybreak on the morning of Sunday, the lookout discovered a vessel in the offing, acting very suspiciously, and leading us to believe that she would run the blockade if an opportunity was given her. We duly got under way and went in pursuit of her. She kept standing off, and led us a merry chase of some fifteen miles from our
o outflank us, and cut off our communication with St. Louis. A review of the events immediately preceding the battle, will show the causes which induced Gen. Lyon to attack an army formidably armed and equipped and outnumbering his own more than three to one. It will be seen that to the last he was the gallant soldier and true patriot, with an eye single to the cause of the Union, and counting his own life as nothing compared with the honor and glory of his country. As I wrote you on the 7th, the enemy were encamped twelve miles from Springfield on Tuesday, while our force was scattered upon the different roads leading to the city, at a distance of three to five miles. Two thousand were five miles from town, on the Fayetteville road, under command of Major Sturgis, of the regular army. This force was ordered by Gen. Lyon to be ready to move at a moment's notice, and at 6 P. M. on that day they were in ranks, artillery horses harnessed, and every thing in readiness. Shortly afte
o outflank us, and cut off our communication with St. Louis. A review of the events immediately preceding the battle, will show the causes which induced Gen. Lyon to attack an army formidably armed and equipped and outnumbering his own more than three to one. It will be seen that to the last he was the gallant soldier and true patriot, with an eye single to the cause of the Union, and counting his own life as nothing compared with the honor and glory of his country. As I wrote you on the 7th, the enemy were encamped twelve miles from Springfield on Tuesday, while our force was scattered upon the different roads leading to the city, at a distance of three to five miles. Two thousand were five miles from town, on the Fayetteville road, under command of Major Sturgis, of the regular army. This force was ordered by Gen. Lyon to be ready to move at a moment's notice, and at 6 P. M. on that day they were in ranks, artillery horses harnessed, and every thing in readiness. Shortly afte