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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 185 185 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 47 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 46 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 44 44 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 37 37 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 25 25 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 24 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 24 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for 7th or search for 7th in all documents.

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ntry very level, and the weather, during the march, superb. Supplies of all kinds were very abundant. From the first to the eighth of December, our line of march was down the Peninsula between the Ogeechee and Savannah Rivers, following the Louisville and Savannah Road, encamping on the first on Baker's Creek; on the second, at Buckhead Church; on the third, at Horse Creek; on the fourth, at Little Ogeechee; on the fifth, at Sylvania Cross-Roads; on the sixth, near Cowpens Creek; on the seventh, on Jack's Branch, near Springfield; and on the eighth, near Eden Cross-Roads. As we approached the coast, the surface of the country became flat and swampy. Large ponds or pools were met every mile or so, and the creeks spread out into several miry branches. The roads between the creeks and ponds, though apparently of sand, and substantial character, proved to be upon a thin crust, which was soon cut through by our long trains into the deep quicksand, requiring miles of corduroy. At
ntry very level, and the weather, during the march, superb. Supplies of all kinds were very abundant. From the first to the eighth of December, our line of march was down the Peninsula between the Ogeechee and Savannah Rivers, following the Louisville and Savannah Road, encamping on the first on Baker's Creek; on the second, at Buckhead Church; on the third, at Horse Creek; on the fourth, at Little Ogeechee; on the fifth, at Sylvania Cross-Roads; on the sixth, near Cowpens Creek; on the seventh, on Jack's Branch, near Springfield; and on the eighth, near Eden Cross-Roads. As we approached the coast, the surface of the country became flat and swampy. Large ponds or pools were met every mile or so, and the creeks spread out into several miry branches. The roads between the creeks and ponds, though apparently of sand, and substantial character, proved to be upon a thin crust, which was soon cut through by our long trains into the deep quicksand, requiring miles of corduroy. At
eat. Ample supplies of forage were also obtained along the road. My command marched on this day about twelve miles, and encamped at a point about six miles from the Ogeechee River, six from the Savannah and sixteen from Spring-field. On the seventh, our march was resumed at eight A. M. My brigade had charge of about three hundred wagons, consisting of the division and the cavalry trains. The road soon entered the Cowpens Branch Swamp, a low, flat, boggy surface, about three miles in widthnd marching in the direction of Sylvania. On the fourth, we marched about twelve miles. On the fifth, marched two and a half miles, and went into camp about eleven P. M. On the sixth, marched about eight or ten miles toward Springfield. On the seventh, seven companies were detached to go back after forage with wagons, which they loaded, and rejoined the regiment that night, which had marched about ten miles toward Springfield. On the eighth, we marched to Springfield, four miles, and from th
ed meals from over ten thousand (10,000) rations. While, after the army moved northward in pursuit of Hood, about the first of October, detachments of the different army corps left behind with baggage and so forth, were reported to the post commander, pursuant to orders from Major-General Slocum, to the number of twelve thousand seven hundred men, (12,700;) the different detachments commanded by persons of the different grades, from that of colonel to that of corporal. All business on Sundays was stopped in the city, all stores and public buildings closed. When the city of Atlanta was about to be evacuated, and the army of Georgia about to commence the campaign of Savannah, and all railroad track and buildings, all warehouses and public buildings that would hereafter be of any military use to the enemy, were to be destroyed, under direction of Captain C. M. Poe, Chief Engineer military division of the Mississippi, the duties of the post command were to protect from accidental
second Illinois, who had reached the place the evening before. I remained at the place with the command until the seventh instant, when, in obedience to orders from General Corse, commanding division, the command prepared to move back to CartersvFifty-seventh Illinois infantry, Colonel Rowett and Major Hanna both being wounded in action the day before. On the seventh instant, the regiment was assigned to the Third brigade, till we could rejoin our own. Left Allatoona for Rome at four P. M.ded eighty-six officers and men. I was placed on the train. The regiment started from Allatoona on the afternoon of the seventh, and arrived at Rome, Georgia, on the ninth of October, 1864. I am, very respectfully, William Hanna, Lieutenant-Colix enlisted men; aggregate, four hundred and five. The command moved from Allatoona at about half-past 2 P. M. on the seventh, marched to Cartersville that night; next day, the eighth, to Kingston, where one company from Fifty-seventh Illinois we
Eaton, of the Commissary Department, who thanked God that an attempt was to be made to relieve Major Anderson's command, and from the energetic and enthusiastic cooperation of this officer, the expedition was immediately provisioned for all contingencies. The frigate Powhatan, Captain Mercer, sailed on the sixth of April, 1861; the Pawnee, Commander Rowan, on the ninth; the Pocahontas, Captain Gillis, on the tenth; the Harriet Lane, Captain Faunce, on the eighth; the tug Uncle Ben on the seventh; the tug Yankee on the eighth; and the Baltic, Captain Fletcher, dropped down to Sandy Hook on the evening of the eighth, and went to sea at eight A. M. of the ninth. The officers of the army who accompanied the military force were, First Lieutenant Edward Me K. Hudson, First Lieutenant Robert O. Tyler, and First Lieutenant C. W. Thomas. Soon after leaving Sandy Hook, a heavy gale of wind set in, which continued during the whole passage. At three A. M. of the twelfth, we reached the
g the final withdrawal. The number of guns, then, lost by McClellan in this battle was nineteen. Soon after I read the letter to Mr. Lincoln above quoted, I wrote to General William F. Barry, General McClellan's chief of artillery during the Peninsula campaign, requesting him to refer to his reports and to inform me how many guns he had reported lost by my division at Gaines's Mills, and received the following reply: Washington, March 10, 1864. My dear General: Your note of seventh instant is just received, and finds me on the eve of departure for the South-west, whither I am ordered for duty with General Grant's armies. I regret extremely that my papers relating to the Peninsula campaign are all packed up, and have been sent away, and that I have no better reference than my memory to enable me to answer your queries. I can, however, state in general terms that the guns lost by field batteries belonging to your division were but a very small portion of the whole number
, it moved toward Richmond. I am, General, very respectfully, your obedient servant, T. J. Jackson, Lieutenant-General. General Ewell's reports. headquarters Third division, Valley District, June 16, 1862. Major R. L. Dabney, Assistant Adjutant-General, Valley District: Major: I have the honor to submit the following report of the action of the eighth instant at Cross-Keys, between the division commanded by me and the forces under Major-General Fremont. I was ordered on the seventh, by the General Commanding, to occupy the advance, and my division encamped for that night near Union Church. The enemy made a reconnoissance in the afternoon, and, going forward, I found General Elzey drawing up his own and General Taylor's brigades in position. I at once determined to meet the enemy on the ground selected by General Elzey. On the morning of the eighth, the enemy advanced, driving in the Fifteenth Alabama, Colonel Cantey, from their post on picket. The regiment made
te House, that gunboats are not so dangerous as is generally supposed. On the afternoon of the seventh, the batteries returned to their camps, the men being much exhausted from loss of rest and contames River, four miles below Charles City Court-House. About seven A. M. on the morning of the seventh, opened on a transport, and, after some twenty shots, made her turn back, throwing overboard a at the houses in the vicinity, occupied only by inoffensive families. On the evening of the seventh, the batteries returned to their camp. Respectfully submitted. S D. Lee, Colonel of Artillernts for the protection of the capital. The position assigned me was held until Monday, the seventh instant, when, by General Huger's order, I returned to my camp at this place, all my other batteriey, and took up camp in the woods on its left, where it remained till the morning of Monday, the seventh, when it moved forward about a quarter of a mile, and spent the day in line of battle, on picke
reenforcements should arrive there, Ewell's, Hill's, and Jackson's divisions were moved, on the seventh, in the direction of the enemy, from their respective encampments near Gordonsville. On the mo near Culpeper Court-House, I directed Generals Ewell and Hill to leave their encampment on the seventh, and, at dawn on the following morning, to resume the march, and move via Barnett's Ford. The sions were such that I did not require General Hill's division to follow General Ewell's on the seventh; but I did expect it to do so on the eighth; and such would have been the case, had General Hill carried out the instructions which I gave him before he left his encampment on the seventh, to move at dawn on the morning of the eighth. Ewell moved early in the morning, and though he did not crttle of Cedar Run, on the ninth of August, 1862: About five o'clock P. M., Thursday, the seventh instant, this regiment, with the balance of the brigade, and in rear of the brigade, marched in the
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