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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 185 185 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 47 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 46 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 44 44 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 37 37 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 25 25 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 24 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 24 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for 7th or search for 7th in all documents.

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ich was read twice, and referred to the Committee on Military Affairs. On the seventh, Mr. Wilson reported it back with amendments. The bill provided: That the strike out two hundred, and insert one hundred and eighty. The Senate, on the seventh, on motion of Mr. Wilson, resumed the consideration of the bill, the pending qlunteer force; and the amendment was agreed to, and the bill passed. On the seventh, the Senate, on motion of Mr. Lane, of Indiana, took it up for consideration. n in the States in rebellion under the orders of the War Department. On the seventh, the Senate, on motion of Mr. Wilson, proceeded to the consideration of the bige or promise, acted by authority of the War Department. The Senate, on the seventh, on motion of Mr. Wilson, proceeded to the consideration of the bill. On the n insane or drunken person, should do so for pay or profit. Mr. Cowan, on the seventh, moved to amend the bill by striking out the words, court-martial or military
nts of the enemy's plans and movements. Accordingly, leaving Baldwin on the seventh, (see papers appended, marked H,) the main body of my forces was assembled her5 P. M. I. General Van Dorn's army will start at three h. A. M., on the seventh instant, on its way to Tupelo, via the road from Baldwin to Priceville. It will hII. General Hardee's corps will start for Tupelo, at four h. P. M., on the seventh instant, via the same road as General Van Dorn's army, stopping for the night at a of cavalry will remain in its present position until twelve P. M., on the seventh instant, and afterwards in the vicinity of Baldwin (guarding the rear of Hardee's ve for Tupelo, via Carrollsville and Birmingham, at three h. A. M., on the seventh instant, stopping for the night at Yanoby Creek, a few miles beyond the latter towdge's, (passing to the westward of Carrollsville,) at two h. P. M., on the seventh instant, stopping for the night at or near Birmingham; leaving there at three h. A
zeal and efficiency. He was ready at all hours to go to any position, either to the skirmishers in front or along the line; his calm, courageous bearing won my admiration and esteem, and to his intelligence and ready perception of his duties my labors, which would have been arduous in being placed suddenly in command of the brigade, were lightened by his aid. After remaining at our intrenched position, we marched off on Wednesday, the sixth instant, and returned to this camp on Thursday, seventh instant. It remains now but to speak of our losses. They were heavy, (lists of which have already been forwarded to division headquarters, Brigadier-General Pender,) and among them I regret to announce the death of Colonel James M. Perrin, Orr's rifle regiment, who was mortally wounded while gallantly fighting his regiment at the breastworks, on Sunday, third May. Colonel Perrin was one of the captains of my old regiment, (First South Carolina volunteers,) and on duty with me in South
perfect success, though my pickets were at the time in hearing of the enemy's pickets. My command was thus safely extricated from immediate imminent danger. I learned satisfactorily, during the afternoon of the sixth, that the spur of Lookout Mountain was held by Chatham's division, supported immediately in rear of Hindman's (late Withers's) division, being the whole of Lieutenant-General Polk's Corps. My two small brigades confronted this force. About eight A. M. in the morning of the seventh, I received a copy of a communication addressed by the commanding General to the Corps commander, saying that he thought it would be safe (judging from some indications he had obtained of the movements of the enemy) to threaten the enemy on the spur of Lookout Mountain with a part of my force. This communication the corps commander appears to have construed into an order to make a reconnoissance in force, and accordingly ordered that I should make such a reconnoissance without loss of time
ion of their material. On the morning of the seventh, the enemy was inside the bar with all his irt at a quarter past four o'clock P. M. on the seventh, a return of the guns engaged, a return of ame iron-clad fleet of the abolitionists on the seventh of this month: On the fifth, the attacking a half or four miles from this fort. On the seventh it advanced in the direction of the harbor, ovan's Island engaged in the action of the seventh instant with the enemy's iron-clad fleet. The acreport in detail of the engagement on the seventh instant, of the enemy's iron-clad fleet with the share in the glorious little fight of the seventh instant, with the turreted iron-clads in Charlest about half-past 2 P. M., on Tuesday, the seventh instant, the officer of the day reported to me the information, arriving at three A. M. on the seventh. During the day and evening of the sixth, the island until after one A. M., on the seventh instant; hence there were seven hours for the com[5 more...]
orts that Ellett's marine brigade passed up the Mississippi on the seventh. The same evening, three gunboats and nineteen transports, loaded. Twelve thousand troops passed Memphis going up the river, on the seventh. The same day, fifty pieces of artillery were landed at Memphis, e stake is a great one. I can see nothing so important. On the seventh the President notified me that all the assistance in his power to 0) men, to Port Hudson, and hold the place at all hazards. On the seventh, indications rendered it probable that the enemy would make a raidn your condition. I hope to attack the enemy in your front on the seventh, and your co-operation will be necessary. The manner and the propnnessee. Can one or two brigades be sent from the east? On the seventh I again asked for reinforcements for Mississippi. I received noll back to Jackson. The army reached Jackson the evening of the seventh, and on the morning of the ninth, the enemy appeared in heavy forc
of June--the enemy gradually extending his intrenched line toward the railroad at Acworth. On the morning of the fifth the army was formed, with its left at Lost Mountain, its centre near Gilgath Church, and its right near the railroad. On the seventh the right, covered by Noonday Creek, was extended across the Marietta and Acworth road. The enemy approached under cover of successive lines of intrenchments. There was brisk and incessant skirmishing until the eighteenth. On the fourteenth tth. Our infantry and artillery were brought to the south-east side of the river that night, because two Federal corps had crossed it above Powers' Ferry on the eighth, and intrenched. Lieutenant-General Stewart took command of his corps on the seventh. The character of Peachtree Creek, and the numerous fords in the Chattahoochee above its mouth, prevented my attempting to defend that part of the river. The broad and muddy channel of the creek would have separated the two parts of the army
he tete-de-pont on the Rappahannock, near the railroad, on the seventh instant. I received information that the enemy was moving on Kelly'portion of two brigades of this division, by the enemy, on the seventh instant. Having received, on the fifth, an order to relieve the brind I received no report from Colonel Penn on the sixth; but on the seventh, a little before two P. M., I received a despatch from him stating Those of the guns of the Louisiana Guard battery captured on the seventh, had been previously taken from the enemy by Hays' brigade by actuhe recent operations of my division on the Rappahannock. On the seventh, and for some days previous thereto, my division was camped betweeords, it was the duty of the division to watch. About noon on the seventh, the enemy's cavalry, which had for several days been stationed ineen the pickets. About eleven o'clock on the morning of the seventh instant, our vedettes reported a regiment of the enemy's infantry pass
ver and at Simmsport. Where is General Polignac's brigade? Is it armed and ready for service? At junction of the Huffpower and Boeuf, or on the latter, near Washington, as the enemy may move, would be the place for it. Communicate the contents of this to department headquarters. I have no staff officer with me, and am fatigued and jaded beyond description. Respectfully, your obedient servant, R. Taylor, Major-General. P. S.--Nothing of the boats, which left Alexandria on the seventh ultimo. Afraid they have come to grief on the Atchafalaya. R. T. M. G. Major Surget, A. A. G. Upon the foregoing report was the following endorsement: Headquartes District Western Louisiana, Alexandria, July 17, 1863. Respecfully forwarded for the information of the Lieutenant-General commanding, with the remark, that the boats of which General Taylor speaks in the P. S., met the enemy's gunboats at the mouth of the Atchafalaya, and returned safely to this post E. Surget, A. A. G.