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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 77 77 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 61 61 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 40 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 36 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 33 33 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 31 31 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 27 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 26 26 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 23 23 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 20 20 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. You can also browse the collection for 8th or search for 8th in all documents.

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17th. Gentlemen: My attention has just been called to the despatch of Major-General Halleck, commanding the enemy's forces, which, coming from such a source, is most remarkable in one respect — that it contains as many misrepresentations as lines. General Pope did not push hard upon me with forty thousand men thirty miles from Corinth on the fourth inst., for my troops occupied a defensive line in the rear of Twenty Mile Creek, less than twenty-five miles from Corinth, until the eighth inst., when the want of good water induced me to retire at my leisure to a better position. Moreover, if General Pope had attempted, at any time during the retreat from Corinth, to push hard upon me, I would have.given him such a lesson as would have checked his ardor; but he was careful to advance on after my troops had retired from each successive position. The retreat was conducted with great order and precision, doing much credit to the officers and men under my orders, and must be loo
for that purpose, while we hugged the west bank in close proximity to the bridge, and waited for Fremont, whose advance had already begun. During the night of the seventh, scouts came in and informed us that Fremont had marched two miles towards us, and was drawn up in line of battle at a place called Cross Keys. It was not a village; there were no more than half a dozen houses scattered around, and all that gave it a name was a rude country church and cemetery. On the morning of the eighth, we were already prepared for them, but nothing more than heavy artillery fire took place, and many imagined that nothing of importance would transpire. In the afternoon, however, infantry skirmishing brought on a fierce engagement, and for a time the fight was hot and heavy. We had not more than seven thousand engaged, and they about ten thousand; and, although we rapidly gained ground, they maneuvered so well that we accomplished little. Artillery fire was fierce on both sides, and seve