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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 77 77 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 61 61 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 40 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 36 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 33 33 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 31 31 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 27 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 26 26 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 23 23 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 20 20 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for 8th or search for 8th in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 9 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 7: the Trent affair. (search)
The Trent was one of a line of British steamers which ran regularly between Vera Cruz and Havana, thence to St. Thomas, and from there to England. The company had a contract with the British Government to carry the mails, and its steamers had ample accommodations for the passenger travel between England and the West Indies. The Trent left the port of Havana on the morning of the 7th of November, under the command of Captain Moir. Nothing of interest occurred until about noon of the 8th, when, in the narrow passage of the Old Bahama Channel, opposite the Panador Grande light, from the Trent was seen a steamer ahead, apparently waiting and showing no colors. The Trent at this time was on her legitimate voyage; she had touched at no port in the Southern Confederacy, and had held no communication with vessels coming from or going to the insurrectionary States; neither was she bound herself to any Southern port, but was pursuing the route usually traveled by the company's mai
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. (search)
n Mercer, sailed on the 6th of April; the Pawnee, Commodore Rowan, on the 9th; the Pocahontas, Captain Gillis, on the 10th, the Harriet Lane, Captain Faunce, on the 8th, the tug Uncle Ben, on the 7th, the tug Yankee on the 8th, and the Baltic, Captain Fletcher, on the 8th; rather an unusual way for an expedition to start out, and c8th, and the Baltic, Captain Fletcher, on the 8th; rather an unusual way for an expedition to start out, and calculated to cause a failure even if there were no other obstacles in the way. Three army officers accompanied the troops. Soon after leaving Sandy Hook a heavy gale set in, and continued during most of the passage to Charleston, and the Baltic, the fastest and staunchest vessel, only arrived off Charleston harbor on the 12th of8th; rather an unusual way for an expedition to start out, and calculated to cause a failure even if there were no other obstacles in the way. Three army officers accompanied the troops. Soon after leaving Sandy Hook a heavy gale set in, and continued during most of the passage to Charleston, and the Baltic, the fastest and staunchest vessel, only arrived off Charleston harbor on the 12th of April, and communicated with the Harriet Lane, the only vessel that had arrived before her. At 6 A. M. the Pawnee arrived, and Mr. Fox went on board of her and informed Commander Rowan of his orders to send in provisions, asking him to stand in towards the bar. Commander Rowan replied that his orders required him to remain ten
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 15: capture of Fort Donelson and battle of Shiloh. (search)
services rendered by the gun-boats Lexington and Taylor. Captain Gwin's report. the Navy aids materially in saving the Army from destruction. a terrible battle and great loss of life. the Confederates as fighters. extracts from records of the times. congratulatory orders, &C. On the 8th of February, 1862, Gen. Grant telegraphed to Gen. Halleck: Fort Henry is ours; the gunboats silenced the batteries before the investment was completed. I shall take and destroy Fort Donelson on the 8th. and return to Fort Henry. The same reasons which had induced Grant to undertake the capture of Fort Henry still urged him to take Fort Donelson; that is, to get the control of the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers and be able to penetrate into the heart of Tennessee with his troops and Foote's gun-boats. On the 7th of February his cavalry penetrated to within a mile of Fort Donelson, but they could obtain no information as to the strength of the place or the number of troops. Foote w
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
ice of the Department, as worthy supporters of the cause we have espoused. Very respectfully, T. H. Stevens, Lieutenant-Commander, U. S. N. Flag-Officer S. F. Dupont, Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Order for Unadilla and other ships to take possession of Beaufort, S. C. Flag-Ship, Wabash, Port Royal Harbor, Nov. 10, 1861. Sir-It has been reported to me by Lieutenant-Commander Ammen that, on taking possession of the town of Beaufort, under my orders of the 8th instant, he found that most of the white inhabitants had abandoned the town, and that the negroes were committing excesses and destroying private property. You will proceed with the most convenient dispatch in the gun-boat Unadilla, under your command, to Beaufort, where you will find the gun-boat Pembina (Lieutenant-Commander Bankhead), and the gun-boat Curlew (Lieutenant-Commander Watmough), and assume command of the station. You will employ your forces in suppressing any excesses on the
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
ice of the Department, as worthy supporters of the cause we have espoused. Very respectfully, T. H. Stevens, Lieutenant-Commander, U. S. N. Flag-Officer S. F. Dupont, Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Order for Unadilla and other ships to take possession of Beaufort, S. C. Flag-Ship, Wabash, Port Royal Harbor, Nov. 10, 1861. Sir-It has been reported to me by Lieutenant-Commander Ammen that, on taking possession of the town of Beaufort, under my orders of the 8th instant, he found that most of the white inhabitants had abandoned the town, and that the negroes were committing excesses and destroying private property. You will proceed with the most convenient dispatch in the gun-boat Unadilla, under your command, to Beaufort, where you will find the gun-boat Pembina (Lieutenant-Commander Bankhead), and the gun-boat Curlew (Lieutenant-Commander Watmough), and assume command of the station. You will employ your forces in suppressing any excesses on the
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 41: the Red River expedition, under Major-General N. P. Banks, assisted by the Navy under Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. (search)
r, through Franklin, directing Lee to proceed as far as possible on the night of the 7th, with his whole train, in order to give the infantry room to advance on the 8th. The forces of General Lee only advanced one mile between the 7th and 8th of April, and on the latter date Lee reported by letter to General Franklin that the enemalthough the fighting commenced that afternoon, and Lee complained of a want of troops to keep from being driven in. Banks did not go to the front until late on the 8th, and then sent word to Franklin that the enemy were prepared to make a strong stand at the point where they were holding Lee, and that he (Franklin) had better makery to co-operate with a large body of cavalry in such an expedition. From Lee's report it will appear that while the whole brigade of infantry was engaged on the 8th, only three regiments out of a whole division of cavalry were in action. The result, as General Lee expressed it, was that the first brigade of infantry got very m
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
left me almost at the mercy of the enemy. The records of the campaign do not at all support the reckless and fiery ardor of this statement. The fleet did not reach the place appointed until two full days after the first decisive battle with the enemy. The Admiral occupied four days in moving one hundred and four miles on what he calls a rising river, with good water, to the place appointed. General T. Kilby Smith states that the fleet made twenty miles on the 7th,fifty-seven miles on the 8th, eighteen miles on the 9th, and nine miles on the 10th of April--total, one hundred and four miles. The failure of the fleet to move up the river with ordinary expedition, together with the fact that the gun-boats were unable to pass Grand Ecore until the 7th, justified the belief that its advance had been prevented by the low stage of water, and governed the Army exclusively in its retrograde movement to Grand Ecore, as it did in every important operation of the campaign. The Admiral's disp
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 51: effects of the fall of Fort Fisher, and criticisms on General Badeau's military history of General Grant. (search)
now Brevet-Brigadier-General), who accompanied the former expedition, was assigned, in orders, as chief-engineer of this. It will be seen that these instructions did not differ materially from those given for the first expedition, and that in neither instance was there an order to assault Fort Fisher. This was a matter left entirely to the discretion of the commanding officer. The expedition sailed from Fort Monroe on the morning of the 6th, arriving at the rendezvous, off Beaufort, on the 8th, where, owing to the difficulties of the weather, it lay until the morning of the 12th, when it got underway and reached its destination that evening. Under cover of the fleet, the disembarkation of the troops commenced on the morning of the 13th, and by 3 o'clock P. M. was completed without loss. On the 14th a reconnaissance was pushed to within five hundred yards of Fort Fisher, and a small advance work taken possession of, and turned into a defensive line against any attempt that might
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 55: operations of the Mississippi Squadron in the latter part of 1864 and in 1865. (search)
s hard as the condition of the roads would permit, and have succeeded in taking some few prisoners — probably some five or six hundred--since the enemy crossed Duck River. From the best information I have at this time, Hood's losses since he invaded the State of Tennessee sum up as follows: Six (6) general officers killed, six (6) wounded and one (1) taken prisoner at Franklin--thirteen in all, and about six thousand (6,000) men killed, wounded and taken prisoners at same battle. On the 8th instant, at Murfreesboroa, he had one (1) general officer wounded, about one thousand (1,000) men killed, and two hundred and seven (207) taken prisoners, losing two (2) pieces of artillery. In the battles of the 1st and 16th instant, before Nashville, he had one (1) lieutenant-general severely wounded, one (1) major-general and three (3) brigadier-generals, with four thousand four hundred and sixty-two (4 462) officers and men made prisoners, besides losing fifty-three (53) pieces of artillery