hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 77 77 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 61 61 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 40 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 36 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 33 33 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 31 31 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 27 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 26 26 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 23 23 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 20 20 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for 8th or search for 8th in all documents.

Your search returned 40 results in 16 document sections:

1 2
a., May 14. General: I have the honor to report to you the result of the engagement of the eighth inst., near McDowell on the Bull Pasture Mountains. As an apology for the delay in transmitting thant, I deemed it prudent to fall back and concentrate at McDowell. Upon the next morning, (eighth inst.,) the enemy was seen upon Bull Pasture Mountain, about one and three quarter miles distant fr of Connecticut cavalry. With this help I reached Gen. Milroy at two o'clock A. M., on the eighth inst. I was, to use his own expression, just in time. I found his regiments of infantry partly in ve the honor to submit to you a report of the battle of Bull Mountain, which occurred on the eighth instant, near McDowell. This report would have been sooner made, but for the constant duty upon whio this report, and is my excuse for the delay. Under your orders, on the afternoon of the eighth instant, I marched to attack the confederate forces then in position on the top of Bull Mountain, ha
itable position for the night. The skill and gallantry displayed by Cluseret on this and frequent former occasions during the pursuit in which we have been engaged deserve high praise. Respectfully, J. C. Fremont, Major-General. General Schenck's report. headquarters Schenck's brigade, Mountain Department, camp at Mt. Jackson, Va., June 12. Col. Albert Tracy, A. A.G.: I have the honor to report the part taken by the Ohio brigade, in the engagement at Cross Keys, on the eighth instant. It was about one o'clock P. M. when I arrived near the point of the road leading to Port Republic, where the advance-guard had already come upon the enemy. A staff-officer, after indicating the position where my cavalry was to be left in reserve, informed me that I was to pass into the field and take position on the right, forming my line of battle and placing my batteries so as to support Brig.-Gen. Milroy, whose brigade, preceded mine in the march, was already getting into line.
lery, and pressed forward to his support as rapidly as possible, reaching the position occupied by him some two miles north of the town, at two o'clock P. M., eighth instant. The position was selected by Col. Daum, I understand, as the only tenable one in that vicinity. From that officer I learned that the enemy had eighteen p Colonel Dunning. camp near Luray, June 11. The Fourth brigade, under the command of Col. Carroll of the Eighth Ohio regiment, was repulsed on Sunday, the eighth, when the Third brigade, under Gen. Tyler, was ordered to support him. We met some of the men of the Fourth brigade five miles from the battle-field, straggling along the road. We reached the battle-field about five o'clock on the afternoon of the eighth, and lay on our arms till morning, when we were opened upon from the rebel battery. We were soon placed in line of battle, but none too soon, for the enemy's infantry was moving on us. The Seventh Indiana regiment was on the right of our
mmanding Second Iowa Cavalry. Cincinnati Commercial account. camp near Farmington, Miss., May 10, 1862. Gen. Pope's little army have been chafing and edging up toward the enemy for ten days, several miles in advance of the main column. It is rather a remarkable fact that our army should have come from Fort Pillow all the way to this place, and then be ready for action so much in advance of the main army — which was said to be ready before we left the Mississippi River. On the eighth we made an armed reconnaissance in force upon the enemy, drove in his pickets, and took a peep at the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, and some of the huge guns planted for its protection. We took headquarters in Farmington, run our telegraph wires to that ancient city of now one inhabitant — the town all finished fifty years ago — and spent rather a pleasant day in the reconnoitre. Our loss was small — but two killed and four wounded. We, however, met with the severe loss of our friend,
and destroying, in their flight, two railroad-bridges, etc. From sources which appear reliable, the enemy's loss was one hundred killed and wounded, and eighteen prisoners taken on this side of the river. Our shells did terrible execution in the town, completely destroying many buildings, among others their commissary depot. I have to report one man wounded of the Seventy-ninth regiment Pennsylvania volunteers, as the only casualty that occurred. We renewed the cannonading on the eighth, which was kept up for three hours, and not receiving a reply, I withdrew my forces. The officers and men under my command behaved nobly, and I compliment them for their steadiness under a galling fire, and for the alacrity displayed in obeying every command. The above is respectfully submitted. H. A. Hambright, Colonel Seventy-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, Acting Brigadier-General Commanding. M. H. Locher, A. A.A. G. A National account. Nashville, Tenn., June 13, 1862.
red nine locomotives and a number of cars. One of the former is already repaired, and is running to-day. Several more will be in running order in two or three days. The result is all I could possibly desire. H. W. Halleck, Major-General Commanding. Gen. Pope did not push hard upon me with forty thousand men, thirty miles from Corinth on the fourth instant; for my troops occupied a defensive line in the rear of Twenty-Mile Creek less than twenty-five miles from Corinth until the eighth instant, when the want of good water induced me to retire at my leisure to a better position; moreover, if Gen. Pope had attempted at any time during the retreat from Corinth, to push hard upon me, I would have given him a lesson that would have checked his ardor, but he was careful to advance only after my troops had retired from each successive position. The retreat was conducted with great order and precision, doing much credit to the officers and men under my orders, and must be looked up
Culpeper, Va., August ninth, 1862. We left Culpeper Saturday morning, the eighth inst., and marched a distance of about eight miles, and arrived at the scene of acive Department, Richmond, May 29. dear sir: I received your letter of the eighth inst., in due course, but the importance of the subject embraced in it required calso reached there from Waterloo Bridge. During the whole of the morning of the eighth, I continued to receive reports from Gen. Bayard, who was slowly falling back i Sperryville to the same place. To my surprise, I received, after night on the eighth, a note from Gen. Sigel, dated at Sperryville, at half-past 6 o'clock that afteain body, I had telegraphed Gen. King at Fredericksburgh to move forward on the eighth, by the lower fords of the Rappahannock and Stevensburgh, to join me. A large pof the retreating enemy; and continued the pursuit until the evening of the eighth instant, when, after resting one day, orders were received to return to Corinth wit
rably, and gallantly maintained the honor of the old Bay State. Respectfully, your obedient servant, George L. Andrews, Colonel Second Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers. Lieut.-Colonel Patrick's report. headquarters Fifth regiment, O. V. I., Culpeper, Va., August 13, 1862. In obedience to orders from brigade headquarters, I have the honor to transmit a record, concerning our action in battle, near Culpeper, Va., August ninth, 1862. We left Culpeper Saturday morning, the eighth inst., and marched a distance of about eight miles, and arrived at the scene of action about two o'clock. We halted in front of the enemy's right, stacked arms and rested about one hour, in the mean time, the artillery had opened fire on both sides, and I think that our artillery opened the fire. We were then ordered, by Gen. Geary, to support a battery which was in position on our centre. On arriving there, our brigade, or rather that part comprising Gen. Tyler's old brigade, (the other pa
Doc. 99.-the rebel conscription law. Jeff Davis's letter to Gov. Brown of Georgia. Executive Department, Richmond, May 29. dear sir: I received your letter of the eighth inst., in due course, but the importance of the subject embraced in it required careful consideration; and this, together with other pressing duties, has caused delay in my reply. The constitutional question discussed by you in relation to the conscription law, had been fully weighed before I recommended to Congress the passage of such a law; it was fully debated in both Houses, and your letter has not only been submitted to my Cabinet, but a written opinion has been required of the Attorney-General. The constitutionality of the law was sustained by very large majorities in both Houses. This decision of Congress meets the concurrence not only of my own judgment, but of every member of this Cabinet; and a copy of the opinion of the Attorney-General, herewith inclosed, develops the reasons on which his
. Banks's corps; and on the seventh Ricketts's division, of McDowell's corps, had also reached there from Waterloo Bridge. During the whole of the morning of the eighth, I continued to receive reports from Gen. Bayard, who was slowly falling back in the direction of Culpeper Court-House, from the advance of the enemy, and from Gem Hazel River to Culpeper Court-House, and also to Gen. Sigel to march at once from Sperryville to the same place. To my surprise, I received, after night on the eighth, a note from Gen. Sigel, dated at Sperryville, at half-past 6 o'clock that afternoon, asking me by what road he should march to Culpeper Court-House. As there wad, with the cavalry force under his command, not yet having been able to join the main body, I had telegraphed Gen. King at Fredericksburgh to move forward on the eighth, by the lower fords of the Rappahannock and Stevensburgh, to join me. A large part of his command had just returned from a very fatiguing expedition against the C
1 2