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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 77 77 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 61 61 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 40 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 36 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 33 33 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 31 31 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 27 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 26 26 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 23 23 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 20 20 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 8th or search for 8th in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
y service, the members of the two higher classes of our colleges, to enable them to attain the degree of Bachelor of Arts. In accord with these instructions, Gov. Swain addressed the following letter to President Davis: University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C., October 15, 1863. To his Excellency, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States. Sir—The accompaning resolutions, adopted by the trustees of this institution at their regular meeting in Raleigh, on the eighth instant, make it my duty to open a correspondence with you on the subject to which they relate. A simple statement of the facts, which seem to me to be pertinent, without any attempt to illustrate and enforce them by argument, will, I suppose, sufficiently accomplish the purposes of the trustees. At the close of the collegiate year 1859-60 (June 7th, 1860s), the whole number of students in our catalogue was 430. Of these, 245 were from North Carolina, 29 from Tennessee, 28 from Louisiana,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.6 (search)
was in Gordon's Division, Jackson's old Corps, afterwards Early's and Gordon's successively. Grant's on to Richmond. General Grant commenced his on to Richmond by crossing the Rapidan river, May 4, 1864, the terrible battles of the Wilderness, or Parker's Store, taking place on the 5th and 6th of May. Grant being worsted, he commenced his slide around, or flanking policy, only to find General Lee boldly confronting him on the heights at Spotsylvania, on the evening of Sunday, the 8th, after a tortuous march through the Wilderness, which was on fire, and burned up to the road on both sides, and in very warm weather, too. It had been evident that preparations were being made for a tremendous conflict, and it came. In the meantime, the famous horseshoe and other earthworks were created, and a sortie was made by the enemy on the evening of the 10th, on a portion of our works, a little to the left of the toe of the horse-shoe, and it was carried, but speedily retaken, with co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Shiloh. (search)
n to advance, and the firing was at long range and without much effect. General Buell (page 295) speaks of this firing, but says: The pursuit was continued no further that day. General Grant (page 109) speaks of the fight continuing till 5 P. M. He also says his force was too fatigued to pursue immediately. I remained on the field until dark, and then withdrew about three miles, and at midnight General Bragg gave me verbal instructions to hold that position. On the next morning, the 8th, Generals Sherman and Wood, each with a division, advanced, but, after feeling our lines, retired. I remained in the position close up to the enemy for about a week. and, with the exception of scouting parties, which approached our lines, the enemy remained quietly in their camp. General Breckenridge had halted his command between my position and Monterey, and the day after the battle rode down to my bivouac, and the following day continued his march to Corinth. General Withers, in his