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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 78 (search)
4th of May. There we rested on the 5th and 6th, and on the morning of the 7th moved in the direction of Tunnel Hill, the enemy having given ground before other troops in advance of us, and passed over Tunnel Hill and took position before Rocky Face Ridge. There the brigade encamped, and this regiment was sent to the front upon outpost duty, and on the 8th advanced up the side of Rocky Face as skirmishers, and were supported by the Thirteenth Ohio Regiment Veteran Volunteer Infantry. On the 9th the regiment was relieved and returned to the base of the ridge, but afterward made frequent moves to the right and left, co-operating with other troops in making demonstrations against the enemy, who occupied the crest of the ridge, and whose stray shots were quite annoying to the troops. One man of my regiment was severely wounded, and it seemed wonderful that many more were not killed and wounded, for the fire from the enemy was almost incessant. On the evening of the 12th this regiment
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 80 (search)
es and bivouacked for the night. On the 4th we moved to the left and front, skirmishing with the enemy; formed our line, and threw up works. In this affair the command lost 1 man killed, 2 wounded, and 2 taken prisoners. On the night of the 4th the enemy again abandoned their works and fell back. On the morning of the 5th we marched in pursuit as far as the Chattahoochee River. Lay there in position until the 10th, having had 1 man wounded on the picketline on the 7th, and I killed on the 9th. On the morning of the 10th marched eight miles up the river and joined with the Twenty-third Corps. On the 12th marched three miles down the river and crossed it, camping in the hills two miles on the south side. On the 13th moved one mile to the right and threw up temporary works; no enemy seen in force in our front. Lay in this position until the morning of the 17th, when the command moved in light marching order four miles down the river to Pace's Ferry, occupied the hill on the south
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 81 (search)
compelled to abandon their last-mentioned stronghold, we lost 1 man killed, 1 officer and 12 men wounded. Sunday, July 3, the enemy disappeared from our front; we started in pursuit at 7 a. m., and camped four miles south of Marietta on railroad; moved into position and fortified. The next day the enemy abandoned their front line of works, and, being pushed, crossed the Chattahoochee River. We remained here until the 7th, when we changed position, moving a half mile to the right. On the 9th we advanced one mile. On the 10th we moved six miles farther up the river, where we remained until the 12th, when we crossed and camped about one mile and a half southeast of the point of crossing. On the 13th we advanced one mile, our regiment on the skirmish line. We remained in camp here until the 18th, when we advanced about three miles, camping seven miles northeast of Atlanta. On the 19th we advanced in front of the division as skirmishers, deploying at Buck Head; we pushed forward
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 85 (search)
foot; Private Minford S. Clark was wounded in the right hand. In these engagements 2 horses were killed and 1 severly wounded. On the 22d of June one gun was struck by a 12-pounder shot and disabled. The battery had. part in no important engagements from this time until July 6, when it was placed in a good position on the right bank of the Chattahoochee River, commanding a rebel battery and covering a pontoon bridge, which the enemy made several unsuccessful attempts to remove. On the 9th instant Private Johnson R. Hathaway was killed by a musket-ball. The battery crossed the Chattahoochee River with the entire Fourth Corps to the left of our line on the 12th instant, took position in line of battle near the river, and remained without important engagements until the 18th. On the 19th at 6 a. m.. the battery was ordered by General Howard into position near Peach Tree Creek. The battery during this day's engagements occupied several positions by sections. During the afternoon t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 97 (search)
rth Illinois Infantry. headquarters 104TH Illinois Infantry, Jonesborough, Ga., September 5, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the One hundred and fourth Illinois Infantry during the campaign in Georgia: The regiment left Ringgold, Ga., on the 7th day of May, numbering 279 enlisted men, carrying muskets, and 17 commissioned officers. They marched to Tunnel Hill and bivouacked. The 8th they moved in front of Buzzard Roost. On the 9th the regiment was ordered to move across Mill Creek and relieve the Seventythird Ohio, of the Twentieth Corps, stationed on a ridge at the right of the creek, between the creek and mountain, the Eighty-eighth Indiana forming on their left. They remained on this line until the 10th, keeping up a lively skirmish fire at times, without losing any men. At daylight on the 11th they were relieved by the Twentyfirst Ohio, and moved back to their former line, where they remained all day. On the 12th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 100 (search)
on the morning of the 5th that the enemy had abandoned his formidable works and retired to the Chattahoochee. At daylight the regiment was put in motion and moved rapidly forward until the enemy's skirmish line was struck near the railroad, about one and a half miles from the river. Here the regiment was placed to support the Thirty-third Ohio, deployed as skirmishers, until retired across the railroad, where it lay under a galling fire of the enemy's sharpshooters until the morning of the 9th, when it was deployed on the skirmish line. Early in the day the line was ordered to be advanced in connection with that of the Third Brigade on our right and the Third Division on our left. The regiment advanced some 300 yards, driving the enemy from his skirmish pits into his main works. We occupied the rifle-pits of the enemy until he threw a strong line against the Third Division, which gave away, exposing our left flank, which compelled us to retire to our original position. During t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 108 (search)
entangled in the abatis. At this moment the enemy opened a murderous fire of grape and canister, and, judging it impossible to carry the works with our force, orders were received to fall back twenty yards, reform the line, and build works. This battalion remained here until daylight of the 8th, when it was relieved and returned to the old works in rear. During this assault the battalion was under a severe fire from 3 p. m. till dark, losing 3 killed, 41 wounded, and 8 missing. On the 9th instant moved into works built on the night of the 7th, remaining until the night of the 10th instant, losing 2 men killed and 3 wounded. On the 11th moved into works on left of Third Division, relieving troops belonging to Este's brigade, and remained until the 26th instant, having 11 deserters come into our line; and losing 3 men wounded while-in this position. On the night of the 26th abandoned the works, moving out quietly at 8 o'clock, leaving a strong skirmish line behind with orders to f
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 115 (search)
e army from Ringgold on Atlanta: We marched from Ringgold on the morning of May 7 and deployed line at Tunnel Hill. A few artillery missiles passed over us and some slight skirmishing only opposed our progress until we arrived in front of Buzzard Roost on the morning of the 9th. Here the enemy were well fortified in a strong position, and notwithstanding our demonstrations refrained from showing themselves in force or developing the position of their batteries until the afternoon of the 9th, when I received orders from General Johnson to move forward with my command to the support of General Carlin, who had succeeded in gaining the side of the mountain without further opposition than the enemy's skirmishing. I had scarcely crossed the creek and was emerging from the woods into an open field, when the enemy for the first time opened his artillery on the top of the mountain. His well-directed shot repeatedly struck my lines, but, to the credit of those often-tried and discipline
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 124 (search)
short rest, and then moved forward four miles, where the heavy skirmishing gave evidence that we had again crossed their path. After a sharp fight of four hours they again fell back, and took up a new position. On the 5th we again started in pursuit, overtook them, and formed line of battle, and commenced shelling their works, which were of the most formidable character. Remained in that position until the 7th, when the line was ordered to fall back of our works and go into camp. On the 9th the regiment was ordered to move forward and support the Twenty-first Ohio in making a charge, which they successfully made, driving the enemy into their main line of works. After remaining in positon until dark, the regiment was ordered to return to camp, having accomplished all that was intended. On the 17th crossed the Chattahoochee River, formed line, and commenced to skirmish for three miles, carefully feeling our way and developing their new line of works, and then fortified strongly.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 127 (search)
ent a regiment from Morgan's brigade to take possession of a high round hill immediately in my front, known to us as Signal Hill. This duty was well performed by the Tenth Illinois Regiment, commanded by Colonel Tillson. McCook's brigade had the advance during the day, and most of the fighting required to be done in driving in the enemy's pickets and skirmishers was gallantly performed by his troops, superintended by himself. The division remained in this position until the forenoon of the 9th, when an advance into the gap of Buzzard Roost was determined upon. Mitchell's brigade was ordered to advance along the left of the road and drive in the enemy's pickets, occupying a little group of round-shaped hills in front of the enemy's works, which obstructed the gap. This duty was performed by a line of skirmishers, supported by his whole, brigade. The ground thus gained was held, and my entire division took position in the gap. During the succeeding three days my troops were kep
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