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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 102 102 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 46 46 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 34 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 34 34 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 33 33 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 29 29 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 27 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 21 21 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 20 20 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for 9th or search for 9th in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 39: Miscellaneous operations, land and sea.--operations in the Nansemond, Cape Fear, Pamunky, Chucka Tuck and James Rivers.--destruction of blockade-runners.--adventures of Lieutenant Cushing, etc. (search)
ns of dollars. These mishaps of the blockade-runners greatly lessened the means of the Confederates, and increased the difficulties of exporting cotton — the Confederate sinews of war — and obtaining arms and equipments in return. On the 9th instant the blockade-runner Dare was chased on shore and destroyed by the Aries and Montgomery, as the surf was running so high on the beach that there was no chance of getting her off. On these occasions many acts of gallantry were performed. Actingter inflicting the usual damage on him. The only satisfaction gained on the expedition to Pagan Creek was a temporary scattering of the Confederate troops, and the fact ascertained that the Davidson torpedo-boat had arrived at Smithfield on the 9th inst., and had gone thence to Richmond. On the 5th of May, the army, under General Butler, landed at City Point and Bermuda Hundred, covered by five iron-clads and ten other vessels, without opposition. The river had been carefully dragged for to
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 41: the Red River expedition, under Major-General N. P. Banks, assisted by the Navy under Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. (search)
have enabled them to hold that part of Louisiana until the end of the war, and to plant the Union flag in Texas--the latter a cherished object of the Government. The plan of invasion was a wild one, it is true, but it came nearer success than many hoped for when the expedition started. As soon as the enemy had secured the wagons and guns, they started in pursuit of the Federal Army, which, having halted at Pleasant Hill, was in a measure prepared to receive them. At 3:30 P. M., on the 9th, the enemy attacked the Federal forces with great vigor. The Federal line of battle was formed in the following order: 1st brigade, 19th corps, on the right, resting on a ravine; the 2d brigade in the centre, and the 3d brigade on the left. The centre was strengthened by a brigade of General A. J. Smith's division, whose main force acted as a reserve. The enemy moved towards the right flank of the army, and the 2d brigade withdrew in good order from the centre to support the first. A. J. S
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
nteers.) the Red River dam.--gun-boats passing the rapids at dawn. (from an original sketch by Rear-Admiral H. Walke.) would have been high enough to enable all the other vessels to pass the upper falls. Unfortunately, on the morning of the 9th instant, the pressure of water became so great that it swept away two of the stone barges, which swung in below the dam on one side. Seeing this unfortunate accident, I jumped on a horse and rode up to where the upper vessels were anchored and orderefour days in moving one hundred and four miles on what he calls a rising river, with good water, to the place appointed. General T. Kilby Smith states that the fleet made twenty miles on the 7th,fifty-seven miles on the 8th, eighteen miles on the 9th, and nine miles on the 10th of April--total, one hundred and four miles. The failure of the fleet to move up the river with ordinary expedition, together with the fact that the gun-boats were unable to pass Grand Ecore until the 7th, justified the
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
mpelled to secrete myself and party in a negro hut near by; here I remained two days, when I received information that the enemy, tired of waiting, had recrossed the river, thus leaving me free to advance. At dark on the 7th instant, having secured the services of a negro guide, I started in the direction of Whitesville, advancing with caution, and moving only by night. After much tedious and difficult marching through the swamps, I reached a point near Whitesville on the morning of the 9th instant. The town was held by the enemy in strong force, and, finding traveling on foot consumed too much time, I determined to impress horses, and by a bold dash break through the pickets on the Lumbertown road. With this purpose in view, I left my bivouac in the swamps, and succeeded in passing unobserved until I reached the cross-road to Whitehall, which I found picketed. After satisfying myself that the picket had no reserve, we made a quick dash and captured two men without alarm, and bef