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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 102 102 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 46 46 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 34 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 34 34 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 33 33 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 29 29 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 27 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 21 21 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 20 20 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott). You can also browse the collection for 9th or search for 9th in all documents.

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, displayed through-)ut the entire march skill and ability of a high order, and removed blockades and made roads for the passage of the other troops. On the 9th instant I directed General Spears to clear the blockade from the Big Creek Gap, and to advance by the Valley road to join me at Rogers' Gap. On the 10th instant I inst expedition was undertaken, but was not successful, as Loudon was occupied by two regiments of the enemy. However, the party fell back without loss. On the 9th instant I received at Lambdin's a telegram from Major-General Buell, informing me that Negley was fully employed in Middle Tennessee and could give me no assistance; thing directions as to the destruction of the railroad bridges at Strawberry Plains and Mossy Creek, I received the second telegram of General Buell, dated on the 9th instant, as also that of the date of the 10th instant. It had been my intention to have advanced against Cumberland Gap on the following day with the brigades of Spear
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
wounded I could gain no information. On the 9th I moved my division some 4 miles toward Farmingorinth, cutting and repairing roads. On the 9th we moved forward to Seven Mile Creek, to the subody of my forces was assembled here on the 9th instant, leaving all the approaches from Corinth cace on the 8th instant and the affair of the 9th instant: On the morning of the 8th instant I asxt morning. Early in the morning of the 9th instant skirmish firing commenced in front of Farmiort of the part taken in the battie of the 9th instant by the brigade under my command, composed oventh Mississippi: About 9 a. m. on the 9th instant I was ordered to move forward from the posi) under my command in the engagement of the 9th instant: On the night previous two regiments ofin by the enemy. About 9 o'clock on the 9th instant two companies of the Third Ohio Volunteer Crred between 10.30 and 11.30 o'clock of the 9th instant. The enemy did not advance farther than th[19 more...]
I am, yours very truly, Jass. S. Negley, Brigadier-General, Commanding. General O. M. Mitchel. No. 3.-report of Col. John Adams C. S. Army, including the operations of his brigade, May 9-30. Headquarters Brigade, Sweeden's Cove, East Tenn., May 30, 1862. General: Having received information from couriers sent by myself that Generals Smith and Evans were moving on Huntsville (and with your permission), I crossed the Tennessee River, with my command, at Lamb's Ferry, on the 9th instant. Obtaining reliable information that there were large wagon trains on the Pulaski and Elkton turnpike, I marched, on the evening of May 11th, with 850 men, toward Pulaski, but finding there were 2,500 men in Pulaski, I returned in the direction of my camps. At the forks of the roads, 9 miles from Rogersville, I found General Negley, U. S. Army, with two regiments of infantry, one battery of artillery, and a battalion of cavalry, in possession of the Lamb's Ferry road. His forces
ot discriminate between them, because each one displayed a heroism worthy of the cause we are engaged for. Very respectfully, Thos. Harrison, cMajor, Commanding Texas Rangers. Col. J. A. Wharton. May 9, 1862.-Engagement at Farmington, Miss. Report of Capt. David Provence, Arkansas Battery. camp, near Corinth, Miss., May .10, 1862. General: The following is respectfully submitted as a report of the movements of my battery connected with the attack on Farmington on the 9th instant: On the evening of the 8th one section of my battery was ordered witli Colonel Embry's regiment, the remainder to move with your brigade, which it did. On the morning of the 9th my orders were substantially to follow the brigade until near the scene of action, then to make myself useful wherever I could. Accordingly I kept with your command as closely as the nature of the ground would permit, and when near the scene of the engagement passed the brigade on the left flank and reached t