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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 44 44 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 41 41 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 39 39 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 38 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 31 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 20 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 20 20 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 17 17 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 17 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 15 15 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for 10th or search for 10th in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. (search)
ficers granted leave of absence, crew sent to the receiving ship, and the vessel put out of commission. To read the account of the naval historian (Boynton), the Navy Department depended on the Powhatan for the success of this expedition, yet on the 2d of April she was lying at the Navy Yard a sheer hulk, preparing to go into dock! Mr. Fox states that the Powhatan, Captain Mercer, sailed on the 6th of April; the Pawnee, Commodore Rowan, on the 9th; the Pocahontas, Captain Gillis, on the 10th, the Harriet Lane, Captain Faunce, on the 8th, the tug Uncle Ben, on the 7th, the tug Yankee on the 8th, and the Baltic, Captain Fletcher, on the 8th; rather an unusual way for an expedition to start out, and calculated to cause a failure even if there were no other obstacles in the way. Three army officers accompanied the troops. Soon after leaving Sandy Hook a heavy gale set in, and continued during most of the passage to Charleston, and the Baltic, the fastest and staunchest vessel, onl
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 15: capture of Fort Donelson and battle of Shiloh. (search)
such support to induce them to proclaim their sentiments openly. Grant lost no time in getting together a force which he deemed sufficient for the attack on Fort Donelson. Reinforcements were rapidly coming in from various quarters, and Halleck, who up to this time had thrown every objection in the way of the expedition, now seemed anxious to take the credit of the movement to himself, and was doing all he could to hurry troops, stores and siege implements to the scene of action. On the 10th he informed Grant that large re-enforcements would be sent to him. Grant did not, however, wait for these re-enforcements, but while Halleck was writing about picks and shovels he informed Foote that he was only waiting for the return of the gun-boats to attack Fort Donelson. This fortification was the strongest military work in the entire theatre of war. It was situated on the west bank of the Cumberland River, north of the town of Dover, on a peculiarly rugged and inaccessible series
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
en the Ceres made a gallant dash past the forts, with a full supply of ammunition, and joined the besieged force above. On the 6th, a small naval battery of two light guns was established on shore, commanding the channel from above, to repel any attempt on the part of the enemy to attack the gun-boats from that quarter by water. On the 7th inst. 112, on the 8th 107, and on the 9th 55 shot and shell were fired by the enemy at the gun-boats without inflicting any serious damage. On the 10th, Acting-Ensign J. B. De Camarra succeeded in getting a schooner through from the lower fleet, loaded with naval ammunition. On the 12th, the gun-boats silenced and destroyed by their fire a battery which the enemy had erected with sand-bags and cotton-bales, abreast of the town, and which for seven days previously had maintained an active and dangerous fire on them. On the 13th, the Confederate boats filled with infantry, as pickets on the river below the forts, were driven ashore by Ac
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 41: the Red River expedition, under Major-General N. P. Banks, assisted by the Navy under Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. (search)
would use the captured guns against the fleet, from point to point, with fearful effect. The old soldier actually shed tears in his chagrin and mortification at being thus forced to abandon the results of a victory. As soon as General Taylor heard of Banks' retreat, he issued a general order, of which the following is an extract: In spite of the strength of the enemy's position, held by fresh troops of the 16th corps, your valor and devotion triumphed over all. The morning of the 10th instant dawned upon a flying foe with our cavalry in pursuit, capturing prisoners at every step!! Although in this there was a good deal of that exaggeration which characterized General Taylor, perhaps it was natural under the circumstances, when he found the Federal Army actually retreating after having beaten him. The facts, however, are that Taylor was some miles distant from the battle-field at the time Banks started to return to Grand Ecore. The Confederate army was scattered in all dir
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 43: operations of the Mississippi squadron, under Admiral Porter, after the Red River expedition. (search)
from Clifton to Eastport under command of Colonel Hoge, consisting of the 113th and 120th Illinois infantry, 660 strong; 61st U. S. colored infantry, 600 strong, and Battery G, 2d Missouri light artillery (four rifled 12-pounders). These troops embarked on the 9th of October, at Clifton, on the transports City of Pekin, Aurora and Kenton, and they set out for Eastport under convoy of the Key West, Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant E. M. King, and the Undine, Acting-Master John L. Bryant. On the 10th the vessels arrived off Eastort. After passing Line Island, ten miles below, signal was made from the Key West to be cautious and proceed in close order. On approaching Eastport, everything seemed quiet; and as there were no signs of troops or batteries on the hill commanding the landing, Lieutenant King signalled to the transports to land their troops, and took a position with the gunboats in the middle of the river, so as to cover the movement with their guns. The troops commenced dise
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
with ammunition in abundance, were taken in these works, while the enemy lost heavily in killed and wounded. Apalache and Blakely Rivers were at once dragged by the sailors in boats, and sixteen large submerged torpedoes were taken up. On the 10th instant the Octorara, Lieutenant-Commander W. W. Low, and the iron-clads were succesful, by the diligent exertions of Commander Pierce Crosby, of the Metacomet, in clearing the rivers of torpedoes, in moving up nearly abreast of Spanish Fort. From th the purpose of receiving the surrender of the vessels under the command of Commodore Ebenezer Farrand, of the Confederate States Navy. The iron-clad steamer Chickasaw and the tin-clad Nyanza accompanied the Cincinnati. On the morning of the 10th instant the vessels had all assembled at the bluff. Lieutenant-Commander J. Myers, the officer appointed by Commodore Farrand to make the surrender, came on board, and after some consultation with me on the points of the condition of the surrender, s