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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 44 44 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 41 41 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 39 39 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 38 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 31 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 20 20 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 20 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 17 17 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 17 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 15 15 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for 10th or search for 10th in all documents.

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s Ridge, and marching by the town of Villanow. It was on Monday, the ninth of May, when he reached the western entrance of Snake Creek Gap, and prepared to wrest it from the enemy. Singularly enough, it had been left both unfortified and unguarded by the rebels; a brigade which was hurried forward to dispute McPherson's passage, came too late; and ere the day was closed, that General found himself in full possession of this important pass, with scarcely the firing of a gun. On Tuesday, the tenth, General Dodge, with two divisions of the Sixteenth corps, closely supported by General Logan, with the Fifteenth, moved from the month of the gap, passed the Sugar Valley Post Office, drove in some small bodies of rebel skirmishers, and actually advanced to the range of hills which, in this direction, overlook Resacca. There were the enemy's formidable lines of works in open view; not so strong, indeed, as they were afterwards made, but formidable nevertheless even at that time. Had Gener
he seventh sent the Twelfth regiment off, and on the eighth started for Nashville with the Thirteenth and One Hundredth regiments. On arriving at Larkinsville, found that the rebel General Lyon had cut the road, and was sent in pursuit of him by General Cruft, who was at Larkinsville. Moved to Scottsboro on the morning of the ninth, and found that Lyon had gone towards the Tennessee river. In conjunction with Colonel Malloy's brigade, started in pursuit on Guntersville road. On the tenth, overtook Mitchell's brigade, and marched to Law's Landing, where, by order of General Cruft, I took post. On the eleventh, I received orders to return to Larkinsville, as Lyon had escaped across the Tennessee river. Arrived at Larkinsville on the evening of the twelfth, and loaded troops the next evening (thirteenth), and started for Nashville, at which place we arrived at four o'clock P. M., on the fifteenth day of January, 1865. The conduct of the troops during the whole campaign
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 19. the siege of Suffolk, Virginia. (search)
th I was advised that General Foster was in great need of troops, and asked to send him three thousand. I replied, no soldiers ought to leave the department, but I would spare that number, provided they could be supplied at short notice. On the tenth, at 4:30 P. M., as the troop train was leaving, I was informed of the contents of a captured mail by General Viele, to the effect that General Longstreet would attack me at once with from forty to sixty thousand; that he had maps, plans, and a stor his own advance upon Suffolk, for the purpose of inducing the authorities in North Carolina to call on Virginia for reinforcements. As designed, ten thousand men were asked for North Carolina, of which I was contributing three thousand on the tenth. The information reached Longstreet at Franklin, and he crossed the Blackwater last night. Major-General Hooker kindly telegraphed that he had advices that General Hill would join Longstreet. The time when the North Carolina troops arrived i
al E. A. Hitchcock, United States Commissioner of Exchange: sir: Enclosed is copy of a communication which, on the tenth instant, I addressed and delivered to Major John E. Mulford, Assistant Agent of Exchange. Under the circumstances of the casng note, to wit: Richmond, Va., August 31, 1864. Major John E. Mulford, Assistant Agent of Exchange: sir: On the tenth of this month I addressed you a communication, to which I have received no answer. On the twenty-second I also addressedto Major-General E. A. Hitchcock, United States Commissioner of Exchange, enclosing a copy of my letter to you of the tenth instant. I now respectfully ask you to state in writing whether you have any reply to either of said communications; and, ifve the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of to-day, requesting answer, &c., to your communication of the tenth instant, on question of exchange of prisoners. To which, in reply, I would say I have no communication on the subject from o
al E. A. Hitchcock, United States Commissioner of Exchange: sir: Enclosed is copy of a communication which, on the tenth instant, I addressed and delivered to Major John E. Mulford, Assistant Agent of Exchange. Under the circumstances of the casng note, to wit: Richmond, Va., August 31, 1864. Major John E. Mulford, Assistant Agent of Exchange: sir: On the tenth of this month I addressed you a communication, to which I have received no answer. On the twenty-second I also addressedto Major-General E. A. Hitchcock, United States Commissioner of Exchange, enclosing a copy of my letter to you of the tenth instant. I now respectfully ask you to state in writing whether you have any reply to either of said communications; and, ifve the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of to-day, requesting answer, &c., to your communication of the tenth instant, on question of exchange of prisoners. To which, in reply, I would say I have no communication on the subject from o
he enemy, and that it behooved us to move and act constantly as though in his presence; that we were now where we might encounter him at any moment, and that we must, under no circumstances, allow ourselves to be surprised. On the morning of the tenth, the cavalry marched at half-past 5 o'clock, the infantry at seven--thus allowing the infantry to follow immediately in rear of cavalry, as it would take the cavalry a full hour and a half to clear their camp. The habitual rules of march were as sir: I wish to give you some particulars of the defeat and disastrous rout of our forces in the expedition under General Sturgis--particulars that fell under my own observation, for I was in the midst of them during their occurrence. On the tenth, the skirmishing in front became quite severe, but our cavalry slowly drove the rebels back, until they arrived within about two miles of Guntown, when their defence became more obstinate, and our cavalry was compelled to fall back. Colonel Hoge
s been found willing to respond to the call of his country and State, and placed him in command of forces for the purpose of organizing and distributing them, with orders to report from time to time to these headquarters. On the morning of the tenth, the militia force was collected at the Arsenal for equipment, and then, by Colonel Monroe, distributed between the fort, the arsenal, and the bridge leading to South Frankfort. I sent a special messenger through to Louisville, with an order tmonstrated that we were in danger; and when the news was received that Morgan was at Georgetown, no one could doubt his intentions. We, here in Frankfort, were not long in finding out what those intentions were. About seven o'clock P. M., tenth instant, a picket came into my headquarters and announeed that the enemy were advancing on the Georgetown pike. The detachment of scouts had been ordered, but a short time before, to be prepared to strengthen the pickets on any road that might be th
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 36. General Rousseau's expedition. (search)
lonel M. T. Patrick; Second Kentucky cavalry, Lieutenant-Colonel Watts. Second Brigade.--Ninth Ohio cavalry, Captain----; Fourth Tennessee cavalry, Major Stevens; and two guns of Battery E, First Michigan artillery, Lieutenant Wightman. General Rousseau reached Decatur on the ninth of July, and in the evening of the same day, the last detachments of the different regiments which were to compose the command also arrived, and preparations were made for starting the next day. Sunday, the tenth, was a busy day in camp; anything but a Sabbath — like stillness prevailed. In the morning horses were issued to regiments yet in need of them — tents, extra clothing, and other articles not necessary for the trip were packed up to be left behind, and the bustle of preparation was visible in every quarter. No vehicles were to be taken except five ambulances for the transportation of the sick and wounded. The whole command was put in light marching order, so as to move with celerity, the n
by Colonel Moore, of the Twenty-first Missouri, one brigade of cavalry commanded by Brigadier-General Grierson, and one brigade of colored troops, Colonel Bouton, commanding; aggregate strength about thirteen thousand. The whole commanded by Major-General A. J. Smith. The expedition left Lagrange, Tennessee, July fifth, passing south near Salem, through Ripley and New Albany to Pontotoc, where it arrived on the eleventh. At Cherry Creek, six miles north of Pontotoc, on the evening of the tenth, the advance of cavalry encountered the enemy in force of perhaps a brigade, and skirmished with them, killing a few rebels, and having one or two on our side wounded. Before this, on the eighth, the cavalry had a brush with a party of the enemy north of Ripley, in which a Confederate was killed. On the morning of the eleventh, the enemy, a brigade strong, was found in our front, a few miles north of Pontotoc. Our cavalry dismounted and advanced as skirmishers, and two infantry brigades o
g itself for a new campaign. The cars at present come to the river at Etowah, where there is a large bridge, six hundred feet long, seventy-five feet high, and composed of three branches of trestle-work, which is announced to be completed on the tenth. Heavy wagon trains are already running from that point to the army, supplying the army anew; and as soon as the cars cross the bridge, and the wagons are again filled from them, why, then — yes. The army extends nearly to Lost Mountain in ithat, to reach the Macon road and thereby control the supplies for Atlanta, I would have to move the whole army; but before beginning I ordered down from Chattanooga four four and a half inch rifled guns, to try their effect. These arrived on the tenth, and were put to work night and day, and did execution on the city, causing frequent fires, and creating confusion, yet the enemy seemed determined to hold his forts, even if the city should be destroyed. On the sixteenth of August I made my Ord
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