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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 44 44 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 41 41 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 39 39 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 38 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 31 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 20 20 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 20 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 17 17 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 17 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 15 15 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for 10th or search for 10th in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
against Norfolk. Max Weber's brigade was speedily embarked, and, to protect his descent, Commodore Goldsborough's fleet was ordered to escort it. But the Confederate batteries, not having yet been abandoned, fired a few shots in reply, while the Virginia, which, since the wounding of the brave Buchanan, had been commanded by Commodore Tatnall, showed her formidable shell (carapace), and the expedition was countermanded. Two days more were consumed in waiting. Finally, on the morning of the 10th, Weber disembarked east of Sewall's Point. This time the enemy's artillery was silent. There was found an entrenched camp mounting a few guns, but absolutely deserted; General Wool reached the city of Norfolk, which had been given up to its peaceful inhabitants the day previous, and hastened to place a military governor there. The President, who had made his entrance into the newly-conquered city with Wool, announced this cheaply-bought success to the American people in a special bulletin,
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Maryland. (search)
us each corps could follow a different road, the left along the Potomac, the centre in the direction of Frederick, and the right more to northward, in such manner as to approach Baltimore. On the 9th of September, just as Lee was preparing to invest Harper's Ferry, the left and centre of the army of the Potomac occupied the line of the Seneca from the mouth of that river as far as Middlebrook, while it refused its right toward Brookville. Lee put his army in motion for Harper's Ferry on the 10th. On the morning of the 11th, McClellan hastened the march of his own troops, and having no fear for the safety of Baltimore pushed his right wing forward; the latter entered the town of Frederick on the 12th, after a slight engagement with the enemy's rear-guard. On the 13th the whole army had crossed the Monocacy, and the greater portion of it was concentrated around Frederick. By this time Lee, following the roads from Harper's Ferry and from Hagerstown, had placed the passes of South Mo
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book V:—Tennessee. (search)
had already so many times paralyzed its operations. The Louisville and Nashville Railroad, destroyed during the fall, was at last, after much labor, about to be put again in running order along the whole line. The completion of this line would render Rosecrans once more free in his movements; but it was above all necessary to protect him against new devastations. The skirmishing warfare, which had been interrupted for a short time, was resumed during the latter part of November. On the 10th a detachment of Federal infantry repelled at Rural Hill, east of Nashville, the attack of a body of guerillas which had tried to capture a convoy destined for the left wing of the army. A few days later, Morgan, having sent part of his cavalry on a reconnaissance along the right bank of the Cumberland, was attacked by Colonel Kennett, who captured all the booty which the Confederates had collected, and drove them to the other side of the river. On the 27th, this same Colonel Kennett, crossi