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e I shall speak of it as occupied by the enemy; and shall call the point near the Massaponax the right of the crest; and that on the river, and in rear of and above the town, the left; and in speaking of our forces, it will be remembered that General Sumner's command was our extreme right, and General Franklin's command was on the extreme left. During the night of the tenth the bridge material was taken to the proper points on the river, and soon after three o'clock in the morning of the eleventh, the working parties commenced throwing the bridges, protected by infantry placed under cover of the banks, and by artillery on the bluffs above. One of the lower bridges for General Franklin's command was completed by 10:30 A. M., without serious trouble, and afterwards a second bridge was constructed at the same point. The upper bridge near the Lacey House and the middle bridge near the steamboat landing were about two-thirds built at six A. M., when the enemy opened upon the working pa
eating, with which deceit their leaders had hoped to bolster up the weakened spirits of their men. On the morning of the tenth the advance reached New River bridge, and found the rebels drawn up in line on the opposite side, having evacuated their works and burned the carriages of two siege guns. After an artillery duel of two hours, they retreated, when the bridge and public property in the vicinity were destroyed. Our loss here was one killed and ten wounded. On the morning of the eleventh, fifty prisoners arrived from General Averill, with the report that he had been able to reach Saltville, but would strike the railroad at Wytheville. General Crook moved to Blacksburg on this day, and that night heard by courier from General Averill that he had met a large force and could not reach Wytheville, but would be at Dublin that night. Orders were sent to him to destroy the railroad moving towards Lynchburg, which was done for five miles, as far as Christiansburg. Averill rejoin
s desultory along the entire front, and with but very little difficulty we gain the curve of the road, just where it sweeps around the point of the ridge and passes through the gap. To the left of the road on the bald knob taken by Dodge, on the eleventh, the enemy had two guns, and opened viciously as our skirmishers, moving from the cover of the ridge, exposed themselves in the open fields. The line was halted, and a few minutes after three o'clock Griffith's First Iowa battery was answerinason we did not then take possession of Resacca, is probably because it was not at that time determined by the commanding General to make his principal attack upon the enemy's left wing. A portion of Hooker's corps went down to the gap on the eleventh, and passed through. On the morning of the twelfth, the Four-teenth corps, General Palmer, began its march for the same locality, Geary's division, of Hooker's corps, preceded; Schofield's corps and Newton's division, of Howard's, followed.
command crossed during the night at Lawe's Landing, and at a point about one and a half miles above Claysville, in canoes and by swimming their horses. The rest of his command at Claysville was collected at the head of the island above, on the eleventh, attempting to cross, and was alarmed by the coming down of a gun-boat, and dispersed. A portion of the command, under Colonel Chenoweth, left Claysville about twelve M., in direction of Deposit. My advance reached Claysville at two P. M. Colords the Tennessee river. In conjunction with Colonel Malloy's brigade, started in pursuit on Guntersville road. On the tenth, overtook Mitchell's brigade, and marched to Law's Landing, where, by order of General Cruft, I took post. On the eleventh, I received orders to return to Larkinsville, as Lyon had escaped across the Tennessee river. Arrived at Larkinsville on the evening of the twelfth, and loaded troops the next evening (thirteenth), and started for Nashville, at which place we
his command and the piece of artillery. Citizens reported that he had abandoned his command during the night, and had crossed the river by a scow, with the piece of artillery and a portion of his staff. It is probable that about two hundred of his command crossed during the night at Lawe's Landing, and at a point about one and a half miles above Claysville, in canoes and by swimming their horses. The rest of his command at Claysville was collected at the head of the island above, on the eleventh, attempting to cross, and was alarmed by the coming down of a gun-boat, and dispersed. A portion of the command, under Colonel Chenoweth, left Claysville about twelve M., in direction of Deposit. My advance reached Claysville at two P. M. Colonel Salm leaving his men who were barefooted, was sent on immediately to-wards Deposit, with instructions to make that point, or the creek, and beyond, if possible by daylight. He marched his command vigorously pursuing the enemy retreating as squad
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 19. the siege of Suffolk, Virginia. (search)
contents of a captured mail by General Viele, to the effect that General Longstreet would attack me at once with from forty to sixty thousand; that he had maps, plans, and a statement of my force, and that General Hill would co-operate. On the eleventh, Hood's division followed up my cavalry returning from Blackwater on the South Quay roads, and about four P. M. captured, without a shot, the cavalry outposts. Others followed on other roads, and a surprise in open day was attempted. The signaChancellorsville (third), why did not this division keep the rail? By coming to Suffolk it lost more than two full days. Longstreet's army did not pass through Richmond until after the tenth of May. The rear guard left the Blackwater on the eleventh, and was met by our exchanged officers, near the city, on the thirteenth or fourteenth of May. General Lee's testimony. Lee, in his report of Chancellorsville transmitted to the rebel Congress by Jefferson Davis, December thirty-first, 186
aissons, wagons, ambulances, and dead animals, the debris of a broken army, and General Sturgis, two miles ahead at Stubbs', said that he did not expect to save any artillery, wagons, or supplies, and ordered all to move forward except the Second cavalry brigade, directing Colonel Winslow to halt at Stubbs' until all the army had moved past, and then take the rear of the column as far as Ripley, saying that at that point or just beyond he would reorganize. At 2:30 o'clock A. M. of the eleventh inst., Colonel Winslow, supposing the army all past, moved his brigade slowly in the direction of Ripley, but hearing that a portion of the brigade which protected the rear the previous night was yet behind, the cavalry was halted at a creek east of Ripley, and waited for the infantry to come up and pass. Here, as the infantry moved past, the enemy made a vigorous attack upon the rear guard, which was gallantly met by the Third and Fourth Iowa cavalry. The column then moved slowly toward R
ng; aggregate strength about thirteen thousand. The whole commanded by Major-General A. J. Smith. The expedition left Lagrange, Tennessee, July fifth, passing south near Salem, through Ripley and New Albany to Pontotoc, where it arrived on the eleventh. At Cherry Creek, six miles north of Pontotoc, on the evening of the tenth, the advance of cavalry encountered the enemy in force of perhaps a brigade, and skirmished with them, killing a few rebels, and having one or two on our side wounded. Before this, on the eighth, the cavalry had a brush with a party of the enemy north of Ripley, in which a Confederate was killed. On the morning of the eleventh, the enemy, a brigade strong, was found in our front, a few miles north of Pontotoc. Our cavalry dismounted and advanced as skirmishers, and two infantry brigades of the First division were deployed in line of battle, but the enemy fell back without any decided resistence. Our army advanced, and at noon occupied Pontotoc. We remaine
rnly and firmly fill up and push on our columns, three fourths of the strength of the rebellion will melt away, and disappear in a manner of which some of us little dream. A singular and unfortunate casualty occurred on the evening of the eleventh instant, which will deprive the service of an able officer. Colonel Carter Van Vleck, Seventy-eighth Illinois, was walking toward his tent, half a mile in rear of our skirmish line, when a chance bullet struck him above the left eye and penetratele number of casualties attest the vigor with which the demonstration against the rugged height was made. The impregnability of the enemy's position against a direct attack having become thoroughly patent during the afternoon and night of the eleventh, a movement was commenced by all the forces in front of the enemy, less the Fourth corps, to unite with the Army of the Tennessee, and pass to the south and rear of the enemy. Having discovered the withdrawal of our forces, the enemy, on the
the enemy having retreated toward Goldsboroa during the night. Preparations were at once made for a movement on Goldsboroa in two columns--one from Wilmington, and the other from Newbern — and to repair the railroad leading there from each place, as well as to supply General Sherman by Cape Fear river, toward Fayetteville, if it became necessary. The column from Newbern was attacked on the eighth of March, at Wise's Forks, and driven back with the loss of several hundred prisoners. On the eleventh the enemy renewed his attack upon our intrenched position, but was repulsed with severe loss, and fell back during the night. On the fourteenth the Neuse river was crossed and Kinston occupied, and on the twenty-first Goldsboroa was entered. The column from Wilmington reached Cox's bridge, on the Neuse river, ten miles above Goldsboroa, on the twenty-second. By the first of February General Sherman's whole army was in motion from Savannah. He captured Columbia, South Carolina, on the
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