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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ressed itself upon my last waking thoughts. At the first peep of dawn, on the 11th, we were wakened by a few straggling shots in our front, followed by a ringing callowed for preparation. Why were they not hurled to the attack at dawn, on the 11th? Why not at 6 o'clock? Why not at 7? The answer to these questions must, I edience in not obeying Bragg's repeated orders to attack at an early hour on the 11th. I may add, that to make Hindman's attack from the direction of Chattanooga effrtant military post at that point. Arrived at Baton Rouge on the morning of the 11th, it was understood that Major Haskins, commanding the United States forces, had t and dust arrived before the defences of Washington during the afternoon of the 11th, while Bradley Johnson with a portion of the cavalry was making a circuit about was hastening to Harper's Ferry, in his rear, and had reached Martinsburg on the 11th, while overwhelming forces were gathering before him. After skirmishing vigorous
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of service in Charleston Harbor in 1863. (search)
their arms upon the ramp, ready at a moment's call for action. Captain C. Werner, of the German Volunteers, was appointed officer of the night, and in a few minutes every sound was hushed save the swash of the waves upon the beach, and the occasional challege of a sentinel from his post. My own resting place was upon the parapet, and looking up to the cloudless heavens above, the solemn glory of the night impressed itself upon my last waking thoughts. At the first peep of dawn, on the 11th, we were wakened by a few straggling shots in our front, followed by a ringing cheer and three distinct volleys of musketry from our picket line. The anticipated assault was upon us. In an instant, the garrison was aroused, and as the men had slept in position they had only to spring to their feet, and we were ready. Now we could see our pickets, their duty having been faithfully performed, retiring rapidly towards our right, in accordance with the instructions they had received, so as to u
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A defence of General Bragg's conduct at Chickamauga. (search)
of 30,000 Confederates. Can it be denied, that the Confederates ought to have been ready to attack at day-break? The whole of the day and night of the 10th had been allowed for preparation. Why were they not hurled to the attack at dawn, on the 11th? Why not at 6 o'clock? Why not at 7? The answer to these questions must, I fear, condemn General Bragg as a commander. No one with a full knowledge of the facts, can concur with Colonel Anderson in his conclusions. General Bragg in his the principal statements in my letter. I give you a copy of what I wrote, and would call attention to the fact that General Hindman was placed under arrest for disobedience in not obeying Bragg's repeated orders to attack at an early hour on the 11th. I may add, that to make Hindman's attack from the direction of Chattanooga effective it was absolutely necessary for General Hill's corps to be passed through Dug Gap in Pigeon Mountain to cut off the retreat of the enemy to the south or southwe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the history of the Washington Artillery. (search)
ning of the 10th of January, the command, moving by companies, embarked on the steamboat National. It was not made known, until after the departure of our transport what was our destination or purpose; that it was serious and hostile was abundantly apparent from the ample warlike preparation. The expedition was under orders to proceed to Baton Rouge and take possession and occupy, by force or otherwise, the important military post at that point. Arrived at Baton Rouge on the morning of the 11th, it was understood that Major Haskins, commanding the United States forces, had made all necessary preparation to give the State troops a warm reception, but during the day better counsels prevailed and the Federal commander surrendered. Immediate possession was taken of the post and of the vast amount of ordnance and military stores there deposited. The bloodless capture, by the Washington Artillery and the other troops composing the expedition, of one of the largest Federal military and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
defeated and driven in rout towards Baltimore, with the loss of one-third of his command. Early now continued to press forward by forced marches and in spite of heat and dust arrived before the defences of Washington during the afternoon of the 11th, while Bradley Johnson with a portion of the cavalry was making a circuit about Baltimore and breaking the railroads from the north. Great panic and consternation was produced in Washington and at the North. President Lincoln called for hundred by Grant to oppose him. A much larger force than his own had thus been drawn away from Richmond. His position in front of Washington quickly became critical. Hunter was hastening to Harper's Ferry, in his rear, and had reached Martinsburg on the 11th, while overwhelming forces were gathering before him. After skirmishing vigorously on the 12th, Early fell back on that night, and on the 14th recrossed the Potomac at White's Ford, and camped at Leesburg. This retreat was managed most skillfully
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Who fired the first gun at Sumter? (search)
mpleted in thirty-two minutes, and then to begin again. The night before, when expecting to engage, Captain Cuthbert had notified me that his company requested of me to discharge the first cannon to be fired, which was their 64-pound Columbiad, loaded with shell. Of course I was highly gratified by the compliment, and delighted to perform the service—which I did. The shell struck the fort at the northeast angle of the parapet. By order of General Beauregard, made known the afternoon of the 11th, the attack was to be commenced by the first shot at the fort being fired by the Palmetto Guard, and from the iron battery. In accepting and acting upon this highly appreciated compliment, that company had made me its instrument, &c. The above, as written at that very time, would fully establish the fact that the first shot was fired by Edmund Ruffin, and it will be observed that the signal shot which he refers to at Fort Johnson at 4:30 A. M., is the same that S. D. Lee claims as the fir