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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
required but a comparatively small force of the enemy to hold it there. On the 12th General Kautz with his cavalry was started on a raid against the Danville railroounded in our hands, and about 400 prisoners and several hundred horses. On the 12th he destroyed the railroad from Trevilian Station to Louisa Court-House. This ocgton, his cavalry advance reaching Rockville on the evening of the 10th. On the 12th a reconnaissance was thrown out in front of Fort Stevens, to ascertain the enemydition of affairs at Washington, I requested by telegraph, at 11.45 p. m. on the 12th, the assignment of Maj. Gen. H. G. Wright to the command of all the troops that th of June he attacked and captured Cynthiana, with its entire garrison. On the 12th he was overtaken by General Burbridge and completely routed with heavy loss, andwhere, owing to the difficulties of the weather, it lay until the morning of the 12th, when it got under way and reached its destination that evening. Under cover of
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
cking the enemy in force from that quarter, while Howard was keeping t p the impression of a direct attack on Buzzard Roost. This movement was to commence on the 12th. Instructions were given to corps commanders to provide their commands with ten days rations and a good supply of ammunition, sending all surplus wagons back to Ringgold. At 9 a. m. on the 13th General Howard's command occupied Dalton, it having been evacuated by the enemy on the evening of the 12th, concentrating his troops in Dalton. General Howard pursued the enemy along the railroad in the direction of Resaca, capturing a considerable number of prisoners. The concentration of the balance of the army in Snake Creek Gap having been completed by the night of the 12th, at 8 a. m. on the 13th Hooker's corps, preceded by Kilpatrick's cavalry, moved out on the Resaca road in support of McPherson's troops, threatening Resaca. Palmer's corps moved out of Snake Creek Gap two miles northeast of Hooker, and then
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 21 (search)
ise, crossing Pumpkin Vine Creek at 9 a. m. On the 8th we joined the First Division, Fourth Army Corps, near Acworth, Ga., remaining until the 10th, when we moved to the front five companies, deployed as skirmishers, under command of Major Calloway. At about 1 p. m. the skirmishers became engaged with the enemy, and continued warmly engaged throughout the day, the enemy hotly contesting every foot of ground, the Twenty-first losing 2 men wounded. On the 11th we threw up light works. On the 12th did nothing. On the 13th we continued skirmishing with the enemy by details made from the regiment, the enemy being compelled to take refuge in his works located on Pine Mountain, a strong position almost north of Kenesaw Mountain. On the morning of the 15th it was found that the enemy had evacuated during the night. We immediately moved forward and halted in sight of College Hill, near Marietta, Ga., at 8 a. m. We again moved at 10 a. m., and at sunset threw up light works and remained th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 24 (search)
ed to within supporting distance of the skirmish line, and a temporary barricade erected. On the morning of the 5th instant it was found that the enemy had again fallen back, and, pursuant to orders, the brigade marched with the division to Vining's Station, and went into camp along the north bank of the Chattahoochee River. The position of the brigade remained unchanged until the 10th instant, when with the division it moved up the Chattahoochee and encamped near Powers' Ferry. On the 12th instant a crossing of the river was effected, and the brigade went into camp on the left of the division on a high ridge protecting the Powers' Ferry crossing. On the 18th instant the Thirty-fifth Indiana was detached from the brigade (pursuaiit to orders from division headquarters) to guard the supply train of the corps, and did not rejoin the brigade until the 30th of August. On the 18th instant the brigade moved with the division to Buck Head, where it remained until the afternoon of the 19t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 30 (search)
All the ground gained was stubbornly held. The regiment lost 7 wounded, and. Capt. Robert Hale, of Company I, killed. At daylight on July 5 we find the works of the enemy evacuated, and were in readiness to move toward the Chattahoochee River. We go into camp on the right bank at 4 p. m. Here the command rests, only doing picket duty, till the 10th July. One man was wounded on the 7th by a shot from the enemy on the opposite bank. On the 11th of July we move up the river, cross it. On the 12th go into camp, wait orders till 18th of July, when at daylight again ready to march. At 2 a. m. July 19 receive orders from brigade commander to move out as a reconnoitering party on the Decatur road as far as Peach Tree Creek. Two companies were sent in advance of the column. They reached the creek at about 9 a. m., and placed two sentinels on the opposite side. At this point no enemy was discovered. Two mounted men, wearing the uniform of U. S. soldiers, advanced within a few rods of the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 37 (search)
6th the division was moved to a position along the southerly bank of the Rottenwood Creek, where I was bivouacked on the left of the line, and there remained until the 9th; on that day my brigade marched to Roswell Factory, forded the Chattahoochee River, and intrenched in a position on the south side of it, where the command remained until the 11th, when, being relieved by a part of the Sixteenth Army Corps, I was ordered by you to recross the river and bivouacked on the north side. On the 12th the command marched back to the old position on Rottenwood Creek, and on the morning of the 13th again crossed the Chattahoochee River on the pontoon bridge at Powers' Ferry, and went into position about two miles from the river at the forks of the main road, my brigade on the left, and retired from the main line, where it fortified and remained until sunrise the morning of the 18th, when the march was commenced toward Atlanta on the Buck Head road. My brigade was bivouacked that night on th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 45 (search)
We were kept in reserve until the 30th of June, when the regiment took position on the left of the front line, where we remained until July 2, 8 p. m., when we moved to the left. Marched again on the 3d of July. Passed Marietta. Remained all the day on the 4th of July in camp in line of battle. Moved on the 5th. Encamped near the Chattahoochee River. Changed camps on the 7th of July. Marched to Roswell July 9. Crossed the Chattahoochee River the same night. Recrossed the river on the 12th. Arrived in camp again on the 13th of July. Crossed the river again on the 14th. Stayed in camp until July the 18th. Resumed our march again.. Camped that night near Buck Head. Left camp in the evening of the 19th; crossed Peach Tree Creek and went in position. On the 20th of July, in the morning, changed our position. My regiment was posted in the center of the second line. About 3 p. m. I was ordered to relieve the Eighty-eighth Illinois Volunteers, then deployed as skirmishers. Af
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 52 (search)
t Illinois Infantry. headquarters Fifty-First Illinois Infantry, Near Atlanta, Ga., September 12, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to submit the following condensed report of operations of my command during the late campaign: Left Cleveland, Tenn., May 3, and commenced skirmishing on the 5th at Buzzard Roost, where, on the 9th, part of the regiment participated in an unsuccessful charge on the enemy's works. Had 2 men wounded at this point. The enemy fell back on the night of the 12th, and we passed through Dalton on the 13th in pursuit, and engaged them at Resaca on the 14th, losing Captain Lester, killed, and 20 men wounded. The enemy evacuated his works on the night of the 15th, and we followed, skirmishing continually until the 19th, when we halted, and the whole army rested for three days near Kingston. Resumed the march on the 23d, and found the enemy on the 25th near Dallas. After eleven days skirmishing they retreated, and we rested three days near Acworth. Th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 54 (search)
disastrous to our forces, and especially my regiment. Upon that occasion fell the ever-memorable Col. Alexander McIlvain, a brave and energetic officer, also the high-toned and spirited gentleman and officer, First Lieut. Thomas H. Ehlers, together with 19 enlisted men killed and 3 commissioned officers and 49 enlisted man wounded. The attempt to carry the works proving a fruitless one, the regiment withdrew to its former position on the ridge, where it remained until the morning of the 12th instant, when it was removed to a gap in the ridge four miles from Dalton, which position it held at the time the enemy evacuated the city the morning of the 13th instant. Passing through Dalton with the army we followed on in pursuit of the retreating enemy; met and engaged him successfully near Resaca on the 14th instant. The casualties in that day's engagement were 3 enlisted men killed, I commissioned officer and 14 enlisted men wounded. I was on the skirmish line with my regiment skirmish
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 57 (search)
tural advantages, strengthened by defensive works, was impregnable against a direct attack. The demonstration commenced by the division on the 8th was continued throughout the day and almost continuously on the 9th, 10th, 11th, and to noon of the 12th, and although it was intended simply as a diversion, and was made with the skirmish line, a considerable number of casualties attested the vigor with which the demonstration against the rugged height was made. The impregnability of the enemy's powas commenced by all the forces in front of the enemy, less the Fourth Corps, to unite with the Army of the Tennessee and pass to the south and rear of the enemy. Having discovered the withdrawal of our forces, the enemy, on the afternoon of the 12th, commenced a counter movement, the object of which was to turn our extreme left, then held by the cavalry, under General Stoneman, and the Second Division, of the Fourth Corps (General Newton). The movement was early discovered by the signal offic
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