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stantly engaged in watchful preparation for an expected attack. I had my batteries and other forces so disposed, as to feel confident of repelling any attack. But we had no collision, except some skirmishing with my pickets and portions of the infantry advanced on the range of hills to my right, as I confronted the enemy's approach, and which resulted only in the loss of two men, one of the Fifth Virginia regiment on the eleventh, and one of the Third regiment Potomac home brigade, on the twelfth, on our side, and four or five of the enemy killed by our shells. The approaches were so guarded as to prevent the enemy from getting his artillery into any commanding position, and on the night of the thirteenth he withdrew back along the turnpike road to the southward. I am, very respectfully, your ob't servant, Robert C. Schenck. Brigadier-General Commanding. Colonel N. C. McLean's report. headquarters Seventy-Fifth regiment O. V. I., camp Franklin, May 14, 1862. General
estimated at three hundred, made a demonstration against the train of Col. Starkweather, who dispersed them with canister and shell. The advance captured four scouts, two of whom belonged to the First Kentucky. A portion of the enemy, estimated to be over nine hundred, upon leaving here took the Elk River road; between two hundred and three hundred took the road leading to Florence. The others fled in every direction. Scott's cavalry and transportation train crossed the river on the twelfth. The rebel force which had been concentrated at this point, consisted of seven regiments and battalions of cavalry, under command of Colonel Acting Brig.-Gen. Adams, numbering between two and three thousand. I deem it a duty to refer in complimentary terms to the marked efficiency of Cols. Stark-weather and Hambright, Major Ousley, Captain Jennings and Lieut. Sypher. The endurance and gentlemanly bearing of their respective commands deserves especial notice, a large portion of their
Doc. 70.-capture of the Clara Dolsen. U. S. Gunboat Lexington, White River cut off, Ark., Saturday, June 14, 6 P. M., 1862. On Thursday, twelfth inst., by invitation of Lieut. J. W. Shirk, U. S.N., commanding, we boarded this gunboat off Hopefield, Ark., opposite Memphis, Tenn. On Friday, thirteenth, at ten minutes past five A. M., we got under way down the Mississippi, in company with the U. S. gunboat Mound City, Capt. Kelty, U. S.N.; St. Louis, Capt. W. McGunnegle, U. S.N., commanding, and the tug Spitfire. One howitzer was placed on board of the tug. The Mound City, under Capt. Kelty, U. S.N., was the flag-ship for the expedition. Weather clear and very hot. At forty-five minutes past eleven, the flag-ship Mound City signalled the commanding officers of the St. Louis and Lexington to come on board. At ten minutes past one P. M., passed the mouth of the St. Francis River. At fifteen minutes past one P. M. the flag-ship made a general signal; answered it, rounded too
uctions, I proceeded on the eleventh inst. on board the steam-tug C. P. Smith, Capt. H. C. Fuller. Got, at six P. M., the armaments of two rifled three-inch Parrot guns and one mountain-howitzer on board, and started at once for Fort Wool, to take Capt. Lee, Ninety-ninth New-York volunteers, and his command on board. As part of the men and stores were at Sewell's Point barracks, the tug was made fast for the night, it being not thought advisable to venture further in the darkness. On the twelfth, at four A. M., we got under way; arrived at five P. M. at Sewell's Point, got the men and stores on board, and had to return to Fortress Monroe to take an additional quantity of coal, also some shells for the rifled guns. At ten P. M. we got under way for the mouth of the Nansemond; passed Pig Point battery at seven o'clock P. M.; ran up the river about four miles; got aground on a sand bank at low-tide, and had to wait till return of high-water. I tried to collect all the information I
e days rations, we filled the kettles and buckets out of the remainder, and decided to get along as best we could under the circumstances. The guides were selected to conduct us to the Union settlement, who were also to act as couriers to inform their friends of the nature of our mission. There were but sixteen men and the Captain of company D, First Ohio cavalry, at Decatur, who were also put in readiness to march. In accordance with these arrangements we moved off at daylight on the twelfth inst., in the direction of a place called Davis's Gap, some nine miles south-east of Danville, and twenty-five south of Decatur. The cavalry were thrown out in the advance a suitable distance, to give notice of the approach of an enemy, and a strong advance and rear-guard was at all times kept in readiness for immediate action. When we had proceeded some twelve miles on our way, being unable to hear any thing of the enemy, I ordered the captain commanding the cavalry to proceed with his com
, (two sections,) seventy-two strong, accupied the east bank of Stone's river, at a distance of more than----miles from the encampment of the detachment of the Ninth Michigan volunteers. Orders were received from Nashville the evening of the twelfth inst., directing the first squadron Fourth Kentucky cavalry to proceed at once to Lebanon. The total effective strength of the command at Murfreesboro on the morning of the thirteenth inst., did not therefore exceed eight hundred and fourteen men,r, freely lavished his passes upon every rebel applicant, thereby giving the enemy knowledge of our exact location and strength, and enabling him to strike successfully at us when we were illy prepared to receive the blow. On the evening of the twelfth, a negro came into camp with the startling intelligence that he had discovered three thousand cavalry, encamped on the Woodbury pike, about six miles from Murfreesboro. This important information was received like all other negro news, and our
Mayors office, Natchez, Miss., May 13. sir: Your communication of the twelfth instant has been received by me and laid before the Board of Selectmen of this citll that could be obtained, a slight breastwork of trees was constructed on the twelfth, near the crest of the Heights, and a slashing of timber made for a short disthill near the breastwork and look-out. Skirmishing commenced on Friday, the twelfth, on the crest of the hill. Early on the morning of the thirteenth the enemy mabout fifty killed and wounded. The same courier reports that up to the twelfth instant about twenty-three thousand Kentuckians had joined Gen. Smith, and they we, tents were struck, wagons packed, and at three o'clock on the morning on the twelfth, we silently wended our way from Iuka, leaving the destinies of the town in ththe morning of the seventh at eleven o'clock, and Lieut.-Col. Mills on the twelfth instant, at----o'clock. May their memory ever be cherished by their countrymen.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 108.-surrender of Natchez, Miss. (search)
erty of all peaceable citizens shall be respected, but all property in this city belonging to the so-called confederate States must be delivered up, and the flag of the United States must wave unmolested and respected over your town. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Jas. S. Palmer, Commander. To His Honor the Mayor of Natchez. To this communication the Mayor was directed to make the following reply: Mayors office, Natchez, Miss., May 13. sir: Your communication of the twelfth instant has been received by me and laid before the Board of Selectmen of this city, and I am directed to return the following reply: Coming as a conqueror, you need not the interposition of the city authorities to possess this place. An unfortified city, an entirely defenceless people, have no alternative but to yield to an irresistible force. It is useless to imperil innocent blood. Formalities are absurd in the face of such realities. So far as the city authorities can prevent, there wil
made requisition for axes and spades to enable him to construct defences on the Heights, but obtained none. With ten axes belonging to some Maryland troops, hiring all that could be obtained, a slight breastwork of trees was constructed on the twelfth, near the crest of the Heights, and a slashing of timber made for a short distance in front of the breast-work. The forces under Col. Ford were stationed at various points on the Maryland Heights, the principal force being on the crest of the hill near the breastwork and look-out. Skirmishing commenced on Friday, the twelfth, on the crest of the hill. Early on the morning of the thirteenth the enemy made an attack on the crest of the hill, and after some time the troops retired in some confusion to the breast-work, where they were rallied. About nine o'clock a second attack was made, which the troops behind the breastwork resisted for a short time, and until Col. Sherrill, of the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth New-York, was woun
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 121.-surrender of Munfordville, Ky. (search)
me. Respectfully, C. L. D., Colonel Commanding United States Forces at Green River. Major-General Jones's report. To General S. Cooper, Adjutant-General C. S.: A courier from General Bragg's headquarters, eight miles west of Munfordville, on the night of the eighteenth instant, confirms the report that Bragg captured about five thousand men at Munfordville on the seventeenth instant. Our loss was about fifty killed and wounded. The same courier reports that up to the twelfth instant about twenty-three thousand Kentuckians had joined Gen. Smith, and they were still coming. The home guard was delivering up their guns as rapidly as they could be received. Samuel Jones, Major-General. General Bragg's report. To General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General: The garrison at this place surrendered last night without our firing a gun. We got four thousand (4000) prisoners, four thousand (4000) small arms, pieces of artillery and munitions in large quanti
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