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n of the nine-teenth--two days after the arrival of the advance of the army at Falmouth, and five days after the arrival of the pontoons in Washington from the Upper Potomac. From the report of Colonel Spaulding, who had charge of the pontoons, and from other sources of information. I learned that the order of the sixth of November, from Captain Duane, of the Staff of General McClellan, to move from Berlin to Washington with his train, was not received by Colonel Spaulding until the twelfth instant; that he then at once gave the necessary directions for carrying out the order, after which he proceeded to Washington, arriving there at half-past 10 P. M., on the thirteenth, and reported to General Woodbury, at his residence in the city, the same night, and was requested to call at the General's office the next morning, the fourteenth. Colonel Spaulding called upon General Woodbury at the hour appointed on the morning of the fourteenth, and was requested by the General to wait until
of the river, thereby increasing the depth one foot two inches, and enabling all the fleet to pass the upper falls. This was accomplished in three days and nights, the wing-dams being constructed in the same manner as the tree-dam on the north side of the lower falls, and on the fourth day the work was completed on the main dam, by which the depth of water was increased five feet four and a half inches--a depth sufficient to enable the largest iron-clads to cross. On the afternoon of the twelfth, three of the gunboats, their hatches battened down and every precaution taken to guard against accident, safely passed the dam. Early the following morning the remaining five passed in succession, amid the cheers of the assembled thousands. By three o'clock that day the vessels were coaled; the guns and ammunition, which had been removed to lighten the vessels, replaced; the pontoon bridge at Alexandria laid down to facilitate operations on the dam, taken up; and the whole fleet, with the
his characteristic imperturbability, awaited to give Adams the chance to cross if he chose at the point he had designated, about twenty-two miles from Benton. General McArthur had taken the very wise precaution to send into Yazoo City — which the marine portion of the expedition were now occupying — a portion of his train, so as not to be encumbered therewith in his movements, preferring, unlike some commanders of expeditions, to use infantry to support his advance cavalry force. On the twelfth, General McArthur started his little army eastward, in the direction of Vaughan, distant eighteen miles, determined if the enemy were there, as reported, to make them fight or run. He had gone but a few miles when he came upon the rebels in force, fully displayed upon carefully chosen ground, and apparently determined to resist his march. He immediately drew up his men and offered battle. For a short time the contest was sharp, but a flank movement skilfully managed and a successful adv
his principal attack upon the enemy's left wing. A portion of Hooker's corps went down to the gap on the eleventh, and passed through. On the morning of the twelfth, the Four-teenth corps, General Palmer, began its march for the same locality, Geary's division, of Hooker's corps, preceded; Schofield's corps and Newton's divis make him believe as long as possible that the assault was to be made directly in front. Accordingly, long after we had left Buzzard Roost, on the morning of the twelfth, we could hear Howard's cannon pounding away lively as ever. All along the road to Snake Creek Gap I found the country deserted, as usual, when our army first a combined attack by our cavalry and infantry, it might have succeeded in entirely discomfiting him. In a little skirmish which we had with the enemy on the twelfth inst., the morning we reached our lines near Dalton, we had one man killed, James Self, a brave fellow, greatly beloved by all the boys who knew him. John Taffe, Ch
arkinsville. Moved to Scottsboro on the morning of the ninth, and found that Lyon had gone towards the Tennessee river. In conjunction with Colonel Malloy's brigade, started in pursuit on Guntersville road. On the tenth, overtook Mitchell's brigade, and marched to Law's Landing, where, by order of General Cruft, I took post. On the eleventh, I received orders to return to Larkinsville, as Lyon had escaped across the Tennessee river. Arrived at Larkinsville on the evening of the twelfth, and loaded troops the next evening (thirteenth), and started for Nashville, at which place we arrived at four o'clock P. M., on the fifteenth day of January, 1865. The conduct of the troops during the whole campaign was most soldierly and praiseworthy. Before making the assault on the enemy's works, the knapsacks of the troops comprising the Second brigade were laid aside, and after the works were taken, being ordered to go in pursuit, these were left; and without blankets or any ext
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 19. the siege of Suffolk, Virginia. (search)
and a statement of my force, and that General Hill would co-operate. On the eleventh, Hood's division followed up my cavalry returning from Blackwater on the South Quay roads, and about four P. M. captured, without a shot, the cavalry outposts. Others followed on other roads, and a surprise in open day was attempted. The signal officers, under Captain Tamblyn, rendered most signal service. Lieutenant Thayer held his station for a long time, in spite of the riflemen about him. On the twelfth, about noon, Picket's division advanced on the Sommerton, Jenkins on the Edenton, and a large column on the river, by the Providence Church road. Much fine skirmishing took place on all these roads, but the pickets were pressed back and the enemy was not checked until he came within artillery range. He sustained some loss, and fell back a few miles to his line of battle. On the thirteenth the enemy skirmished with our light troops on all the approaches. On the Sommerton, Colonel Foste
act in conjunction, and when the enemy is ready he will be attacked. The water has risen in the river, and the iron-clad is afloat at Kinston. April fourteenth I wrote, viz.: General Harland reports no change in his front on the twelfth inst.; his letter has the following, which I extract: John Wolfenden, who lives about two miles from Fort Jack, says that he was up towards Greenville last Sunday and saw Captain Myers of Whitford's regiment; he says that Myers told him, that in the salient, with two thirty-two's sweeping the dead angle in front of the Cremaillere line, between the line of fire of Rowan and the river. The Army and Navy appreciate the importance of this work, which I brought to your notice on the twelfth inst. Fort Amory. The Trent River is a very weak feature in the defence of Newbern, compelling two distinct lines, dependent for communication upon a bridge, liable to be burned at any moment, and giving the enemy the opportunity of concentra
eral Wessels. Some of the iron has been made near Atlanta, where the Confederates have extensive works. March twenty-ninth, I wrote, viz.: My spy came in from Kinston last evening, having been out seven days. He says the two iron-clads are to act in conjunction, and when the enemy is ready he will be attacked. The water has risen in the river, and the iron-clad is afloat at Kinston. April fourteenth I wrote, viz.: General Harland reports no change in his front on the twelfth inst.; his letter has the following, which I extract: John Wolfenden, who lives about two miles from Fort Jack, says that he was up towards Greenville last Sunday and saw Captain Myers of Whitford's regiment; he says that Myers told him, that the ram at Kinston was completed, and that the only delay was in the construction of the small boats, to take her over the shoals. He thought everything would be ready in less than a week. I think his account of his conversation with Myers can be
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Fortifications and their Armaments. (search)
rank, to attempt to hold that flank with earthen walls, rather than depend upon wooden ones. The Senior Engineer traced out a small redoubt, using the old lines, and giving a face upon the river. It was done quickly; a one hundred pounder rifle is in the salient, with two thirty-two's sweeping the dead angle in front of the Cremaillere line, between the line of fire of Rowan and the river. The Army and Navy appreciate the importance of this work, which I brought to your notice on the twelfth inst. Fort Amory. The Trent River is a very weak feature in the defence of Newbern, compelling two distinct lines, dependent for communication upon a bridge, liable to be burned at any moment, and giving the enemy the opportunity of concentrating upon either line. Last summer the river was guarded by one or two gunboats, which afforded a measure of protection to the small works, Amory and Gaston, exposed to assault from their advanced positions. These works are located upon the high gr
State Militia, after being wounded, was captured on Pilot Knob, and subsequently, with six of his gallant men, was brutally murdered by order of General Price's Field Officer of the day. The rebel loss at Pilot Knob, killed and wounded, exceeded fifteen hundred, as is shown by the enclosed letter of Surgeon T. W. Johnson, who was left there in charge of our hospital, and also by corroborating testimony gathered since our re-occupation of the post. In the hospital at Ironton, on the twelfth instant, there fell into our hands Colonel Thomas, Chief of General Fagan's staff, three Majors, seven Captains, twelve Lieutenants, and two hundred and four enlisted men (representing seventeen regiments and four batteries), all dangerously and nearly all mortally wounded. The rest of the rebel wounded who were not able to follow the army, were sent south by General Price, under escort of Colonel Rain's regiment. As to the loss of the enemy in the pursuit and at Harrison, I have no informati
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