Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for 14th or search for 14th in all documents.

Your search returned 58 results in 41 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
s Landing. The laying of the pontoon bridge was completed about midnight of the 14th, and the crossing of the balance of the army was rapidly pushed forward by both arms, proceeded to an inhuman and merciless massacre — of the garrison. On the 14th General Buford, having failed at Columbus, appeared before Paducah, but was agaid on the morning of the 13th, and by 3 p. m. was completed without loss. On the 14th a reconnaissance was pushed to within 500 yards of Fort Fisher, and a small advation, but was repulsed with severe loss, and fell back during the night. On the 14th the Neuse River was crossed and Kinston occupied, and on the 21st Goldsborough wreceding news of the surrender of General Lee reached him at Smithfield. On the 14th a correspondence was opened between General Sherman and General Johnston, which erations to General Canby, marched on Montgomery, which place he occupied on the 14th, the enemy having abandoned it. At this place many stores and 5 steam-boats fell
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
t, and General Stoneman on the right, and General McCook looking to our rear and communications. Our depot was at Big Shanty. By the 11th of June our lines were close up, and we made dispositions to break the line between Kenesaw and Pine Mountains. General Hooker was on its right and front, General Howard on its left and front, and General Palmer between it and the railroad. During a sharp cannonading from General Howard's right, or General Hooker's left, General Polk was killed on the 14th, and on the morning of the 15th Pine Mountain was found abandoned by the enemy. Generals Thomas and Schofield advanced and found him again strongly intrenched along the line of rugged hills connecting Kenesaw and Lost Mountain. At the same time General McPherson advanced his line, gaining substantial advantage on the left. Pushing our operations on the center as vigorously as the nature of the ground would permit, I had again ordered an assault on the center, when, on the 17th, the enemy a
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 18 (search)
at Morris Hill until the morning of the 10th, when, moving through the lines of the Twentieth Corps, on the Marietta road, we soon struck the pickets of the enemy. Pushing forward, the enemy was found in force, with an intrenched line extending across the summit of Pine Top Mountain. The division was formed facing this line of the enemy and intrenched in full view and under easy cannon-range of them. This position we maintained with some modifications until the morning of the 15th. On the 14th the position of the enemy was sharply cannonaded by all our batteries, and, as we learned subsequently, the second shot fired from a rifled section of the Fifth Indiana Battery exploded in a group of rebel generals, killing Lieut. Gen. Leonidas Polk. Early the morning of the 15th it was found the enemy had abandoned his work on Pine Top. The position was at once occupied by our skirmishers, and it was learned that Pine Top was an advanced work, the main rebel line being in the rear and conne
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 23 (search)
st energetic and watchful foe, under heavy fire, and firmly maintained our position in pistol-shot range of the enemy's works until they evacuated them. They were of the most formidable character. On the 13th we pursued the rebels, and on the 14th, the First Brigade having the advance, they were found on the road from Dalton to Resaca, near the latter place. My brigade was sent forward to develop their position. Throwing out skirmishers, we advanced and drove the enemy before us until the with lumber revetments for artillery and riflemen. Keeping a heavy line of skirmishers forward, the enemy opened from Pine Mountain with artillery. Remained in this position, with severe skirmishing, the 12th, 13th, and 14th of June. On the 14th a shell from the Fifth Indiana Battery, commanded by Lieutenant Morrison, fired from a 3-inch Rodman gun, from the section commanded by Lieutenant Ellison, killed Lieutenant-General Polk of the rebel army, who, in company with Generals Johnston an
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
picket and commenced fortifying. The morning of the 13th found the enemy gone; the brigade moved out, my regiment in the advance; met with but little resistance until we reached the vicinity of Dalton. My regiment forming the left of the advance, we charged the enemy about 12 m., who were posted on a hill, with two pieces artillery, and were successful in driving them, with only 1 man wounded in the regiment. We then marched eight miles south of Dalton, and encamped for the night. On the 14th we followed the enemy in the direction of Resaca, and found them about five miles this side; passed the rest of the day in fortifying; built a line of works on a hill overlooking the enemy's position; kept up a brisk firing from works all day, with the loss of 3 men killed and 4 wounded. May 16, the enemy having evacuated Resaca on the night of the 15th, we started in pursuit and followed the enemy about ten miles. My regiment captured 72 of the enemy, including 2 commissioned officers. May
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
Sunday, 11th and 12th of June, the regiment still lay in camp on the second line in the same position as on the 10th. On Monday, June 13, the regiment moved one mile to the left, and threw up new works during the night. The rebels in front evacuated the same night. On Tuesday, June 14, the regiment moved forward one mile; finding the enemy in force, we here threw up new works; casualties, 1 enlisted man wounded. On Wednesday, June 15, the regiment continued in the same position as on the 14th. We had some skirmishing, but — no casualties. On Thursday, June 16, the operations were the same as on the 14th and 15th; the casualties of the regiment, 1 enlisted man wounded. During the night the rebels fell back. On Friday, June 17, the regiment moved forward some distance and went into camp. There was heavy skirmishing along the line, but my regiment was not engaged. On Saturday, June 18, the skirmishing still continued, but the brigade to which my regiment belongs was in reserve,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 37 (search)
eek, near Acworth, bringing in 8 prisoners. One of them, a cavalry scout, well mounted and armed, was captured by the commissary sergeant of the Eighty-eighth Illinois, while he (the sergeant) was bathing, naked and unarmed. On the 11th I was placed in reserve, and moved with my command to a point about three and a half miles west, northwest from Kenesaw Mountain, and so remained the 12th and 13th, each day in line of battle, to support the Second Brigade, should it become necessary. On the 14th our line advanced about a mile toward the enemy's works, his sharpshooters skirmishing and falling back. On the 15th the enemy's skirmish line was strengthened and strongly resisted farther advance, but was finally driven back another mile, and at night my brigade bivouacked within 1,000 yards of his main line of works. On the 16th I was again ordered to the front with my command, and that day advanced to a ridge about 500 yards from the enemy's works, and threw up fortifications under a se
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 44 (search)
No. 40. report of Col. Bernard Laiboldt, Second Missouri Infantry, of operations August 14-15 (Wheeler's raid). headquarters Post of Dalton, Ga., August 18, 1864. Sir: I have the honor to lay before you a report of the engagement the forces under my command had on the 14th and 15th days of this month with the raiders under Major-General Wheeler: About 4 p. m. on Sunday, the 14th, a part of Wheeler's force, at the lowest estimate 5,000 strong, surrounded the town of Dalton, and after some picket-firing the following demand for surrender was sent to me under flag of truce: headquarters cavalry Corps, Army of Tennessee, Around Dalton, August 14, 1864. officer Commanding U. S. Forces, Dalton: To prevent the unnecessary effusion of blood, I have the honor to demand the immediate and unconditional surrender of the forces under your command at this garrison. Respectfully, yours, &c., Jos. Wheeler, Major-General, Commanding. To which I answered: officer Command
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 45 (search)
ders, my regiment, as part of the First Brigade, Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, left Cleveland, Tenn., May 3. Continued our march until May 14. When near Resaca my regiment, for the first time in this campaign, was actually engaged. On the 14th, about 3 p. m., the first line of our brigade was ordered by Col. F. T. Sherman, at that time commanding First Brigade, Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, to relieve part of the Third Brigade of same division and corps, at the time hotly engaged the Chattahoochee River. Changed camps on the 7th of July. Marched to Roswell July 9. Crossed the Chattahoochee River the same night. Recrossed the river on the 12th. Arrived in camp again on the 13th of July. Crossed the river again on the 14th. Stayed in camp until July the 18th. Resumed our march again.. Camped that night near Buck Head. Left camp in the evening of the 19th; crossed Peach Tree Creek and went in position. On the 20th of July, in the morning, changed our position. M
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 46 (search)
ejoined the brigade while on the march, having for the previous three months been on duty at the headquarters Second Division. On the 9th we advanced and took position on Rocky Face Ridge in front of Dalton; remained in this position with some slight changes until the morning of the 13th, when it was ascertained that the enemy had evacuated their fortified position. We passed through Dalton and continued the march in the direction of Resaca, near which place the enemy were developed on the 14th. About 2 p. m. advanced with the brigade about 300 yards, when we debouched into an open field. Here we were exposed to galling fire of both artillery and small-arms. Receiving no orders to halt, the regiment advanced at a double-quick step toward a small elevation, behind which we took temporary shelter. After a short delay we advanced to the crest of the elevation and engaged the enemy. In crossing the field before mentioned the regiment became detached from the brigade, the balance of
1 2 3 4 5