Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for 14th or search for 14th in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The Confederate cruisers and the Alabama : the Confederate destroyers of commerce (search)
Cummings. The portraits here grouped were taken in London in 1862 before the departure on August 13th in the steamer Bahama to join Ship no. 290, built at the Lairds' shipyard, which received her guns and crew on the high seas off the Azores. advantage that was proved completely in the action between the two well-matched vessels when at last they met. June 19, 1864, was the momentous day of the meeting. The Kearsarge had located the Alabama in the harbor of Cherbourg, France, and on the 14th of the month had steamed in and passed out again without anchoring. This was both a challenge and a defiance, and Captain Semmes decided that he could hardly do less than go out and meet her. So he wrote the Alabama's agent at Cherbourg, expressing the hope that the Kearsarge would not depart at once, as he intended to fight just as soon as the Alabama could be gotten ready. Through this channel, Winslow was informed of Semmes' intention by the United States consul. It was a bright Sunday