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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
ant bridges and depots, including New River bridge, forming a junction with Crook at Union on the 15th. General Sigel moved up the Shenandoah Valley, met the enemy at New Market on the 15th, and after15th, and after a severe engagement was defeated with heavy loss, and retired behind Cedar Creek. Not regarding the operations of General Sigel as satisfactory, I asked his removal from command, and Major-General on, about 350 men, 11 pieces of artillery, and many small-arms. Our loss was but slight. On the 15th he pushed forward to Alexandria, which place he reached on the 18th. On the 21st he had an engag12th of March, opening up communication with General Schofield by way of Cape Fear River. On the 15th he resumed his march on Goldsborough. He met a force of the enemy at Averysborough, and after a ink you will be able to send under these directions. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. On the 15th he was directed to start the expedition as soon after 1he 20th as he could get it off. I deemed i
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
Resaca at all points. General McPherson got across Camp Creek, near its mouth, and made a lodgment close up to the enemy's works on hills that commanded, with short-range artillery, the railroad and trestle bridge, and General Thomas pressing close along Camp Creek Valley threw General Hooker's corps across the head of the creek to the main Dalton road and down it close to Resaca. General Schofield came up close on his left, and a heavy battle ensued during the afternoon and evening of the 15th, during which General Hooker drove the enemy from several strong hills, captured a 4-gun battery and many prisoners. That night Johnston escaped, retreating south across the Oostenaula, and the next morning we entered the town in time to save the road bridge, but the railroad bridge was burned. The whole army started in pursuit. General Thomas directly on his heels, General McPherson by Lay's Ferry, and General Schofield by obscure roads to the left. We found in Resaca another 4-gun batt
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
my from the hills he had occupied and forced him into his intrenchments beyond. From prisoners captured we learned that Johnston's entire army was confronting us. At daylight on the morning of the 15th our line stood nearly as follows: Palmer's corps on the right, connecting with the left of McPherson's line, then Schofield, Howard, and Hooker, with Mc- Cook's cavalry on our extreme left. Orders were issued during the night of the 14th for the whole line to advance at daylight on the 15th, provision being made for the retirement of Schofield's troops from the position they then occupied, and directions having been given them to take post on the left, where they properly belonged, as soon as crowded out from the center of my line by the advance of Palmer and Howard. About 11 a. m. General Butterfield's division, of Hooker's corps, supported by Williams' and Geary's, of the same command, attacked and carried a series of hills strongly occupied by the enemy on the eastern road l
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
owever, was doing splendid execution, staying the enemy's progress, when a brigade of Williams' was deployed in its support. The advance of the enemy was then immediately and effectually checked, and my thanks are tendered for the generous and opportune assistance rendered. The casualties of the day were 400 killed and wounded in the corps. During the night good intrenchments were made along my entire front. General Hooker and myself were ordered to make an attack in conjunction on the 15th, everything to be in readiness by daylight. General Hooker was obliged to march about two-thirds of his command from the center of the army to the extreme left, which movement took longer than was anticipated. His troops were massed and commenced the advance about noon. As he was the ranking officer I visited him early, learning his intentions as to the points and manner of attack, and prepared to support him in the way he asked. By artillery and musketry firing, by strong demonstrations
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 19 (search)
cke returned to his old position with his brigade, with the loss of 1 man killed. During the night of the 12th and before day the 13th the enemy was unusually active in my front, and at daybreak it was discovered that as many as three new regiments had been added to his lines in that quarter, and placed in position. During the day two regiments of troops from Wood's division reported to me for duty, and were posted on our extreme left, beyond the position occupied by the cavalry. On the 15th General Garrard, with the cavalry, was withdrawn from the line, and left it necessary for me to picket with my command my front and our left flank. Nothing of importance occurred until the 18th, when, by your order, a strong demonstration was made by me at an early hour in the morning. The enemy answered with artillery, doing, however, no damage. The Twentyfirst Illinois Infantry, of the First Brigade (Colonel Kirby), lost 5 men captured on the skirmish line. Nothing new was developed in
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 31 (search)
take a position on the right of the Fifth Indiana Battery, as support for it, connecting the left of my skirmish line with the right of the Fourteenth Army Corps. I did so, and found that I was immediately in front of Pine Mountain. At night built works in my position. From 11th to 13th, inclusive, remained in works. On 14th, at 6 p. m., moved 300 yards to the left and front into old works, which it was found necessary to strengthen, while the left wing had to build new works. On the 15th marched into enemy's works on Pine Mountain, following Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteer Infantry. Halted and remained there until afternoon, then advanced by the flank a short distance, when we were formed in double column on the center, the Ninth Indiana on my right, and the Eighty-Fourth Illinois on my left. Advanced to the skirmish line, which was engaged, and, deploying in line, moved forward under fire and built works near enemy's works. During night my right wing had
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
in driving them, with only 1 man wounded in the regiment. We then marched eight miles south of Dalton, and encamped for the night. On the 14th we followed the enemy in the direction of Resaca, and found them about five miles this side; passed the rest of the day in fortifying; built a line of works on a hill overlooking the enemy's position; kept up a brisk firing from works all day, with the loss of 3 men killed and 4 wounded. May 16, the enemy having evacuated Resaca on the night of the 15th, we started in pursuit and followed the enemy about ten miles. My regiment captured 72 of the enemy, including 2 commissioned officers. May 17, marched to within two miles of Adairsville on duty as train guard. May 18, followed the enemy seven miles in the direction of Kingstoll and encamped for the night. On the 19th drove the enemy about ten miles, passing through the village of Kingston. and encamped within one mile of Cassville, Ga. Our division was in front and had considerable skirm
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 37 (search)
commissary sergeant of the Eighty-eighth Illinois, while he (the sergeant) was bathing, naked and unarmed. On the 11th I was placed in reserve, and moved with my command to a point about three and a half miles west, northwest from Kenesaw Mountain, and so remained the 12th and 13th, each day in line of battle, to support the Second Brigade, should it become necessary. On the 14th our line advanced about a mile toward the enemy's works, his sharpshooters skirmishing and falling back. On the 15th the enemy's skirmish line was strengthened and strongly resisted farther advance, but was finally driven back another mile, and at night my brigade bivouacked within 1,000 yards of his main line of works. On the 16th I was again ordered to the front with my command, and that day advanced to a ridge about 500 yards from the enemy's works, and threw up fortifications under a severe and destructive fire from his lines. A battery was placed in position near my left about midnight, and at daylig
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 50 (search)
en that in the boxes of the dead and wounded, when we were relieved by Sherman's brigade, and went to the rear to replenish ammunition. At dark we took up position on the ridge, in rear of the battle-ground, and camped. On the morning of the 15th instant we changed our lines to connect with General Wood's line, and fortified. May 16, advanced at 6 a. m. and took possession of the enemy's works, and at 8 a. m. marched for Resaca. Reached there at 10 a. m., and halted three hours to repair thet for the rear to-day to be mustered out of service. On the 11th instant we moved two miles to the left and formed on the right of Baird's division, Fourteenth Corps, and fortified, and the 12th, 13th, and 14th were passed in skirmishing. On the 15th we marched at 8 a. m., and halted some hours near Pine Mountain. At 2 p. m. formed with the division in column of attack, expecting to assault the enemy's works, some distance in front. I was ordered by General Newton to form a strong skirmish l
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 51 (search)
where the enemy had posted himself in a very strong position, and for the following ten or twelve days our duty was constant and dangerous, being under fire all of the time, and having one or two men wounded every day. On the 3d day of June Lieutenant-Colonel Swain was wounded, and the command of the — regiment then devolved upon Capt. J. W. Richards. On the 10th the veterans of the Twenty-second Illinois Volunteers, fifty-three in number, were assigned to the Forty-second Illinois. On the 15th the Fifty-first Illinois and the Forty-second were ordered forward as skirmishers to find the enemy's works, which we did in handsome style, driving them into their works and holding them there. Our loss was slight, being only 1 killed and 7 wounded (enlisted men) and no officers, and on the 18th we were again engaged, with a loss of 6 wounded and 2 killed. The next morning we discovered the fact that the enemy had left our front, and we were obliged to follow up the retreating foe; were aga
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