Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 15th or search for 15th in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The story of the Arkansas. (search)
nd took the lead; then came the Iroquois, Oneida (lost in Yokohoma Bay in 1870), Hartford, Sumter, and two other gunboats which were to pass the city and fight the ram. I have reproduced these letters to show that the account I have already given was not exaggerated. Let us now proceed with our narrative. We were dealing with a bold and confident enemy, determined to take some desperate chances to compass our destruction. As the reader already knows our crew was fearfully used up on the 15th. Daily we sent more men to the hospital, suffering with malarious diseases, until we had not in a week more than thirty seamen, ordinary seamen and landsmen, and I think but four or five firemen. Many of the younger officers had also succumbed; those of us who were left were used up also. We slept below, with our clothes on, in an atmosphere so heated by the steam of the engines as to keep one in a constant perspiration. No more men were to be had. It was disheartening enough to see a shi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Drewry's Bluff, May 16th, 1864. (search)
Battle of Drewry's Bluff, May 16th, 1864. report of General R. F. Hoke. headquarters Hoke's division, May 25th, 1864. Captain,—On Sunday, the 15th instant, the intention to attack the enemy on the morning of the 16th at early light was made known to me by the commanding General, while occupying the intermediate line of entrenchments around Drewry's Bluff, and confronting the enemy, who occupied the outer line of said entrenchments, extending his right through the woods in the direction of James river, while his left rested upon an elevated position across the railroad, with his masses immediately in front of our right and resting upon the railroad. The commanding General, seeing the right was the weak point of the enemy, determined upon this as the point of attack. The brigades of Colquitt and Ransom were ordered relieved by an extension of my line to the right, which placed my division in line of battle, commencing at Fort Stephens, with Hagood's brigade on the left,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations around Petersburg-General Hagood's report of 16th, 17th and 18th of June, 1864. (search)
Operations around Petersburg-General Hagood's report of 16th, 17th and 18th of June, 1864. headquarters Hagood's brigade, Hoke's division, 15th July, 1864. Capt. John A. Cooper, A. A. G.: Captain,—I am instructed to report the operations of my brigade on the 16th, 17th and 18th ulto. On the evening of the 15th, about dark, my brigade arrived at Petersburg, by the Petersburg & Richmond railroad, and I was at General Beauregard's headquarters, reporting for orders, when a courier announced that the enemy had carried the defences from No. 3 to No. 7, inclusive, and that our troops were retreating. I was ordered to move out immediately upon the City Point road and take a position to cover that approach to the city, and upon which a new defensive line could be taken. It was after dark, and being unacquainted with the country and unable to learn much from the confused and contradictory accounts of the volunteer guides who accompanied me, I halted my command at the junction
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division army of Northern Virginia Association (search)
roa late the afternoon of the 14th. He relieved the infantry before dawn on the morning of the 15th, and Hill and Longstreet withdrew noiselessly and rapidly through Boonsboroa, to Sharpsburg, eight miles off, where they took position before noon of the 15th. We will now return to Harpers Ferry. McLaws having constructed a road up the Maryland Heights and placed his artillery in position d00 men, 73 guns, and immense supplies of food and ammunition. The position on the morning of the 15th, therefore, was this: McClellan's right, two corps under Burnside, was through Turner's Gap, enot pushing a vigorous pursuit is utterly incomprehensible. But this delay on the morning of the 15th, is even still more extraordinary. He had heard the firing at Harpers Ferry and was advised of te and his Lieutenants. Miles hoisted the white flag at Harpers Ferry at 8 o'clock A. M. on the 15th. Jackson turned over the details of the surrender to A. P. Hill, and started at once to join L