Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for 16th or search for 16th in all documents.

Your search returned 53 results in 40 document sections:

1 2 3 4
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
ve for the execution of this order. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. On the 16th these instructions were substantially reiterated. See Vol. XXXIII, p. 885. On North and South Carolina, and bring them to the defense of those places. On the 16th the enemy attacked General Butler in his position in front of Drewry's Bluff. Huth Side Railroad, as far as possible, without attacking fortifications. On the 16th the enemy, to re-enforce Petersburg, withdrew from a part of his intrenchment inement, capturing and dispersing the enemy's forces wherever he met them. On the 16th he struck the enemy under Vaughn at Marion, completely routing and pursuing him important successes of the war. Our loss was: Killed, 110; wounded, 536. On the 16th and 17th the enemy abandoned and blew up Fort Caswell and the works on Smith's Id another on West Point, both of which places were assaulted and captured on the 16th. At the former place we got 1,50) prisoners and 52 field guns, destroyed 2 gun-
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
pply and re-enforcements. General Rousseau, commanding the District of Tennessee, asked permission to command the expedition and received it. As soon as Johnston was well across the Chattahoochee, and as I had begun to maneuver on Atlanta, I gave the requisite notice, and General Rousseau started punctually on the 10th of July. He fulfilled his order and instructions to the very letter, whipping the rebel General Clanton en route. He passed through Talladega and reached the railroad on the 16th, about twentyfive miles west of Opelika, and broke it well up to that place, also three miles of the branch toward Columbus, and two toward West Point. He then turned north and brought his command safely to Marietta, arriving on the 22d, having sustained a trifling loss, not to exceed 30 men. The main armies remained quiet in their camps on the Chattahoochee until the 16th of July, but the time wfas employed in collecting stores at Allatoona, Marietta, and Vining's Station, strengthenin
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 18 (search)
ery firing was kept up during the night upon the rebel position. About 11 o'clock the rebels made a demonstration on our pickets, occasioning a general discharge of cannon and muskets along the whole line. Soon after, early on the morning of the 16th, it was found the enemy had evacuated under cover of the night. The loss of the division about Resaca, killed, wounded, and missing, amounted to 200. From the evacuation of Resaca to the evacuation of the line of the Etowah. Early on the mollowing the Second Division, but the general commanding the corps having decided an attack impracticable at the point the head of the column struck the rebel line, this division formed in line and intrenched opposite to the rebel position. On the 16th the line was advanced under severe fire. A heavy cannonade was kept up upon the rebel position all day. While laying out a position for a battery this day Capt. Peter Simonson, Fifth Indiana Battery, chief of artillery, was instantly killed by a
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 23 (search)
n of this battery for their gallantry and bravery on this occasion. The enemy's loss was reported by prisoners to be near 300 killed, with some 600 or 800 wounded. My loss was light. May the 15th my brigade was massed in column of regiments to support a portion of General Hooker's corps that assaulted and carried a part of the enemy's works in front of Resaca. At night we lay in the trenches which my pioneers had been engaged in constructing under heavy fire. Early next morning, the 16th, the enemy's works were found to be evacuated. We slowly pursued them, and, passing through Resaca, crossed the Oostenaula late in the evening. The One hundred and fifteenth Illinois, Colonel Moore commanding, was detailed, by order of General Thomas, to guard the works at Resaca. It was a very responsible position, and it has been well done. May 17, we moved slowly in the direction of and within three miles of Adairsville, the enemy slowly and stubbornly yielding. May 18, advanced thro
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 24 (search)
the Twenty-third Corps, directly on the left of the position we had previously occupied before Atlanta. Here the entire brigade, with the exception of the Fifty-first Ohio, which was kept in reserve, was put into the front line of trenches, and remained there until the night of the 25th instant. During this time I was frequently ordered to make demonstrations on the enemy's line, which I did with as much success as was possible, considering the ground on which I had to operate. On the 16th instant, pursuant to orders from the major-general commanding the Department of the Cumberland, the Eighty-fourth Indiana was transferred from this to the Third Brigade of the division. Universal regret was felt throughout my command on parting with the noble regiment which had so long and so honorably been associated wit i this brigade, and it carried with it the best wishes of all. The Fifty-ninth Illinois was assigned to this brigade in place of the Eighty-fourth Indiana. Its commanding offi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 30 (search)
y 14 advanced toward Resaca. At noon came upon the enemy in force. One company was deployed as skirmishers; capture 1 prisoner and drive back the enemy to his works; 1 man was killed and 2 badly wounded. At daylight on the morning of the 15th the Thirtieth Indiana relieves this regiment from front line. At about noon the men sling knapsacks and move on double-quick to support the front line, while all along the line is a heavy engagement. The enemy having evacuated, on the morning of the 16th, we receive orders to move; pass through the works of the enemy to Resaca. Here we halt for dinner, then move on and camp four miles south of the town. The next day we pass through Calhoun. At the town of Adairsville the enemy holds his position till darkness again gives him an opportunity to escape. 18th, pass through Adairsville. On the 19th again came upon the enemy. One company is deployed as skirmishers, who push forward, driving the enemy before them, till near the town of Cassvil
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 37 (search)
orthwest from Kenesaw Mountain, and so remained the 12th and 13th, each day in line of battle, to support the Second Brigade, should it become necessary. On the 14th our line advanced about a mile toward the enemy's works, his sharpshooters skirmishing and falling back. On the 15th the enemy's skirmish line was strengthened and strongly resisted farther advance, but was finally driven back another mile, and at night my brigade bivouacked within 1,000 yards of his main line of works. On the 16th I was again ordered to the front with my command, and that day advanced to a ridge about 500 yards from the enemy's works, and threw up fortifications under a severe and destructive fire from his lines. A battery was placed in position near my left about midnight, and at daylight the 17th the enemy's skirmishers disappeared from my front, when it was discovered that during the night he had evacuated his fortified position and taken up a new one, also fortified, nearly a mile and a half to hi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 46 (search)
th got into position; in the morning threw up works. Remained in this position eleven days, all the time under fire, men being killed and wounded in the most retired line of works. While in this position Lieut. George Coote was severely wounded. From the position in front of Dallas we moved toward Acworth, near which place I remained until the 10th of June. Nothing of moment occurred in my command until the 15th, on the night of which day we threw up works, which were abandoned on the 16th, and a new line constructed in advance. On the morning of the 17th it was again ascertained that the enemy had evacuated their position in our front. On the morning of the 18th advanced on the enemy by the right of companies to the front. This was accomplished with a great deal of difficulty, as the rain was pouring in torrents and the ground to be passed over almost impassable on account of mud; during the day threw up works under fire. During the night the enemy again left their positio
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 47 (search)
y my advanced line, which held its ground. The firing was kept up for half an hour, when the demonstration ceased and all remained quiet till morning, when it was found that the enemy had evacuated Resaca and crossed the Oostenaula River. On the 16th the division crossed the river and moved southward in the direction of Calhoun, which point we reached at sundown and encamped for the night. On the 17th we again took up the line of march and reached a point near Adairsvi]le, where enemy were foediately threw up works, where I remained that night and until evening of the next day, when we advanced our lines, driving in the enemy's skirmishers, throwing up barricades within easy musketrange of the enemy's main works. The night of the 16th instant the enemy again evacuated their works, which we occupied early on the morning of the 17th, when pushing forward we found the enemy again strongly fortified behind heavy works. The Ninety-seventh Ohio Volunteers, and the Twenty-eighth Kentucky
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 49 (search)
, when we advanced to Tunnel Hill and again bivouacked until the 9th. Advanced on that day with the brigade to the top of Rocky Face Ridge to the support of General Harker, who after our arrival made a charge upon the enemy's works. During the charge the regiment was under a brisk fire of musketry, but met with a loss of only 2 men wounded. On the 10th commenced moving slowly upon the enemy, and on the 14th and 15th had engagements with him near Resaca. Had 1 man mortally wounded. On the 16th moved forward, and found the enemy at Adairsville on the 17th, and had an engagement with him. Loss, 13 wounded, 2 mortally. Moved on from Adairsville and arrived at Kingston on the 20th; encamped at the latter place until the 23d. After leaving Kingston we found the enemy in force near Dallas on the 25th. Commenced skirmishing on the 26th, continuing it more or less until the 5th of June. Losses near Dallas were Lieutenant Platt, Company G, killed; Lieutenant Renick, Company F, wounded,
1 2 3 4