Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for 16th or search for 16th in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
, and it is believed now has a movement on foot to reinforce Fort Sumter at Charleston, and to occupy with Federal troops the Southern forts, including Fort Pulaski in this State, which, if done, would give the Federal government in any contest great advantage over the people of this State; to the end, therefore, that this stronghold, which commands also the entrance into Georgia, may not be occupied by any hostile force until the convention of the State of Georgia, which is to meet on the 16th inst., has decided on the policy which Georgia will adopt in this emergency, you are ordered to take possession of Fort Pulaski as by public order herewith, and to hold it against all persons, to be abandoned only under orders from me or under compulsion by an overwhelming hostile force. There was an enthusiastic rivalry among the militia companies at Savannah for the honor of this service. Colonel Lawton selected details from the Chatham artillery, under Capt. Joseph S. Cleghorn, an offic
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
part of Sweeney's division under Corse, and met a bloody repulse. The Confederate army crossed the river at midnight while the Federals were asleep, and the main body marched south of Calhoun while Hardee held back the advance of Thomas. On the 16th, while Thomas' main army confronted Johnston near Calhoun, McPherson was marching toward Rome, and Schofield and Hooker on the left toward Cassville. Johnston, not finding a good position at Calhoun, withdrew the following night to Adairsville,e. Mercer's Georgia brigade, near Gilgal church, by a strange oversight came near being cut off and captured. As they made their escape, Olmstead's First volunteer regiment suffered considerable loss in killed and wounded. On the night of the 16th, Johnston abandoned the Gilgal church and Lost mountain line with all the intrenchments, drawing Hardee's corps, his left, back behind Mud creek, the remainder of the line holding its ground. This disposition made an angle at the junction of Hard