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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
,000 men consumed twelve days in marching about as many miles. The enemy was now encamped in and around Camden. On the 16th Shelby's brigade was ordered to Miller's Bluff to watch the river, and I then had only Greene's brigade of about 500 effective men with me. On the 16th Greene drove in the enemy's pickets on the Prairie d'anne road. They were driven in on the 17th on various roads by portions of that brigade. On the morning of the 17th Colonel Greene's scouts informed me that a large at Johnny Reb were getting away. And so he did, marching across Oostenaula river to Adairsville, which was reached on the 16th. The pontoon bridge over the Oostenaula river was covered with green corn stalks to prevent a noise as the carriages prmy being drawn up in line of battle on a range of hills south of the Oothcaloga Valley, General Johnston, at dusk on the 16th, fell back to Cassville, where he remained till the 19th. An order from General Johnston was that day read to the troops,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Campaign against Steele in April, 1864. (search)
ssisted by other troops; during the remainder of the time we were opposed alone to the enemy, and General Steele's army of 13,000 men consumed twelve days in marching about as many miles. The enemy was now encamped in and around Camden. On the 16th Shelby's brigade was ordered to Miller's Bluff to watch the river, and I then had only Greene's brigade of about 500 effective men with me. On the 16th Greene drove in the enemy's pickets on the Prairie d'anne road. They were driven in on the 17t16th Greene drove in the enemy's pickets on the Prairie d'anne road. They were driven in on the 17th on various roads by portions of that brigade. On the morning of the 17th Colonel Greene's scouts informed me that a large train, two hundred and twenty-five wagons, with a guard of three regiments, two of infantry and one of cavalry, and two pieces of artillery, had moved out on the Prairie d'anne road from Camden I wrote to General Fagan for assistance, as I had only five hundred men. He sent me immediately Cabell's and Crawford's brigades. That night I marched to attack this train, but was
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
While thus engaged, they heard a voice call out to them through the darkness from the enemy in front: It's about time now that Johnny Reb were getting away. And so he did, marching across Oostenaula river to Adairsville, which was reached on the 16th. The pontoon bridge over the Oostenaula river was covered with green corn stalks to prevent a noise as the carriages passed over. The casualties of the Third Maryland at Resaca, were three killed and fifteen wounded: Killed: Corporal B. rtillery. W. A. Russell, Assistant Adjutant. The further retreat. After skirmishing for a while at Adairsville, the army being drawn up in line of battle on a range of hills south of the Oothcaloga Valley, General Johnston, at dusk on the 16th, fell back to Cassville, where he remained till the 19th. An order from General Johnston was that day read to the troops, to the effect that the army would retreat no further, but would meet and fight the enemy at this place. It was heard with t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 72 (search)
l J. K. Jackson, of Georgia, was near with a division of infantry, and that on his arrival the attack would be renewed and successfully pressed. It appears, however, that this information furnished the enemy at the time of the demand for a surrender — was a ruse on the part of General Chalmers, in order to extricate his men from their perilous situation. Finding that the enemy was too strong for him, and were veterans instead of raw recruits, he returned in quick haste to Cave City. On the 16th (two days later) General Bragg moved up and surrounded these forces, then reinforced and numbering 4,500 under Colonels Wilder and Dunham (Wilder afterwards commanded a cavalry brigade, known as Wilder's Lightning Brigade), who on the morning of the 17th of September surrendered, with a very large supply of quartermaster and commissary stores. The 10th Mississippi was marched in to receive the surrender and occupy the forts and fortifications in return for and in compliment of its gallant fi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Correction of errors in statement of Governor Anderson, and letter of General Echols. (search)
n the matter. He was as little likely to assume what did not belong to him as I was to surrender my constitutional function. I frequently consulted General Lee about officers to be employed elsewhere than under his command, and in connection with the subject of West Virginia I have received a copy of a letter written to me by General Lee from his headquarters at Orange Courthouse, 27th of January, 1864. He writes: I have not been unmindful of your request expressed in your letter of the 16th inst., desiring my opinion in reference to the reorganization of the troops in West Virginia. After making favorable mention of a number of officers, he proceeds: I do not know to what duty General Buckner is assigned, but of the officers that have been serving in that department I think General Ransom is the most prominent. At a later date, when General Ransom's health rendered it necessary to relieve him, I sent the following telegram to General Lee: Richmond, August 9, 1864. General R.