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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
of his present line urged upon him. About 2 o'clock in the afternoon General Butler was forced back to the line the enemy had withdrawn from in the morning. General Wright, with his two divisions, joined General Butler on the forenoon of the 17th, the latter still holding with a strong picket-line the enemy's works. But instead of putting these divisions into the enemy's works to hold them, he permitted them to halt and rest some distance in the rear of his own line. Between 4 and 5 o'cl was entered. The column from Wilmington reached Cox's Bridge, on the Neuse River, tel miles above Goldsborough, on the 22d. By the 1st of February General Sherman's whole army was in motion from Savannah. He captured Columbia, S. C., on the 17th; thence moved on Goldsborough, N. C., via Fayetteville, reaching the latter place on the 12th of March, opening up communication with General Schofield by way of Cape Fear River. On the 15th he resumed his march on Goldsborough. He met a force o
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
e for a conference, and I took my departure the same day and reached Nashville, via Cairo, on the 17th, and accompanied him on his journey eastward as far as Cincinnati. We had a full and complete unield's Ferries across the Conesauga and Coosawattee Rivers, which form the Oostenaula. On the 17th all the armies moved south by as many different roads as we could find, and General Thomas had sethe nature of the ground would permit, I had again ordered an assault on the center, when, on the 17th, the enemy abandoned Lost Mountain and the long line of admirable breast-works connecting it withthat direction, and all things being ready for a general advance, I ordered it to commence on the 17th, General Thomas to cross at Powers' and Pace's Ferry bridges, and to march by Buck Head. Generalson, and Generals Stoneman and McCook watched the river and roads below the railroads. On the 17th the whole army advanced from their camps and formed a general line along the old Peach Tree road.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
railroad bridge, so that by night Howard's corps had got across, and marched on Calhoun. Hooker's command crossed the Connesauga at Fite's Ferry and at a ford in its vicinity, thence marching south across the Coosawattee toward Adairsville. Palmer's command was to follow after Howard's, except Davis' division, which was detached and sent toward Rome to the support of Garrard's cavalry, then acting under special instructions from the major-general commanding the military division. On the 17th our advance skirmished with the enemy nearly the whole distance from Calhoun to within two miles of Adairsville, when a fierce skirmish ensued, completely checking our farther progress, and occasioning considerable loss in wounded. Information was brought in about dark that the whole of Johnston's army was at Adairsville. The column was again set in motion on the morning of the 18th, the enemy having left during the night. Howard's and Palmer's commands moved on the direct road and alon
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 16 (search)
th such variation as our judgment could suggest. All, however, tended to confirm the opinion that the enemy held his line in too strong force to be carried by any sudden dash. From this date to the 17th no special movement was made. Our lines were very thin, probably not more than one rank in many parts of the work, but the lack of force was supplied by the material defenses we constructed, consisting of abatis, fraises, &c., so well applied as to make our line almost invulnerable. On the 17th orders were received directing the withdrawing of the corps from their investing line and the massing of the troops behind the Fourteenth Corps. This order also directed the providing of forage, rations, and ammunition for an expedition ot fifteen days. The movement was to commence on the night of the 18th, but the same day orders were received delaying the execution of the order until further instructions, in anticipation of favorable results from a contemplated raid upon the Macon railroad
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 18 (search)
it was found the enemy had evacuated under cover of the night. The loss of the division about Resaca, killed, wounded, and missing, amounted to 200. From the evacuation of Resaca to the evacuation of the line of the Etowah. Early on the morning of the 16th the pursuit was commenced. Finding the bridges at Resaca destroyed, this division built a temporary foot bridge upon the ruins of the railroad bridge over the Oostenaula and pushed on the same evening, camping near Calhoun. On the 17th marched in rear of Newton's division and formed line on his left at 5 p. m., three miles north of Adairsville, where the enemy had made a stand. This division was not engaged. On the 18th passed through Adairsville, getting considerably entangled with the Army of the Tennessee; camped at Cox's house. Early on the morning of the 19th the division took up the line of march for Kingston, The cavalry pickets of the enemy were soon encountered and driven before us through Kingston. We found t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 21 (search)
continued skirmishing with the enemy by details made from the regiment, the enemy being compelled to take refuge in his works located on Pine Mountain, a strong position almost north of Kenesaw Mountain. On the morning of the 15th it was found that the enemy had evacuated during the night. We immediately moved forward and halted in sight of College Hill, near Marietta, Ga., at 8 a. m. We again moved at 10 a. m., and at sunset threw up light works and remained there until the morning of the 17th, when it was found there was no enemy in our front, he having evacuated under cover of darkness. We followed in line of battle until we were relieved, about 12 m., by the Third Division, Fourth Army Corps. We then moved a short distance to the left and halted for the night. On the 19th we moved at 8 a. m., and crossed a deep slough, then recrossed and threw up some light works, our picket detail keeping up a continued fire with the enemy at this point. One man of this regiment was wounde
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 33 (search)
, which position I held until 8 p. m., when I was ordered to fall back to a hollow in my rear, and send forward two companies with my pioneers to build works. At daylight I moved into the works, my right joined by the Eighty-fourth Illinois and left by Thirty-sixth Indiana; nothing of importance took place while I remained here in which I had part. The enemy opened fire at midnight from his main line, which lasted only about fifteen minutes and ceased, my regiment suffering no loss. On the 17th I moved at 9 a. m. through considerable rain, after driving the enemy some four miles, but after two hours fighting he again retreated, having been dislodged by a charge. At 8 p. m. firing ceased, when I was ordered to bivouac for the night. Nothing of importance took place from this until arriving about five miles this side of Kingston on the 19th, when we again encountered the enemy. I was ordered to form line and build works, which I did. Here I remained until 2 a. m. of the 25th, when
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 39 (search)
nister to a ravine, which partly sheltered the regiment. After a few minutes' rest the regiment was ordered by Colonel Miller to move upon the enemy's second line of works, the colonel not having been informed that we were simply to relieve a force of ours which held the first line. The regiment behaved well. Our loss in officers and men was severe. On the morning of the 16th of May, the enemy having again left our front, we marched through Resaca to a point one mile from Calhoun. On the 17th the Thirty-sixth Illinois was deployed as skirmishers and moved through Calhoun toward Adairsville. The skirmishing was very heavy, the enemy making a stubborn resistance. Before noon we lost I officer and 12 men; were relieved by the Eighty-eighth Illinois. At 5 p. m. of the same day, in accordance with orders from the brigade commander, the regiment was put into action and behaved with coolness and courage. The regiment again suffered severely in loss of officers and men. On the morning
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 40 (search)
ols., Camp near Atlanta, September 12, 1864. Sir: I have the honor to present to you the following report of the part taken by the Forty-fourth Regiment Illinois Volunteers: We joined our brigade at Catoosa Springs May 5; marched for Dalton 7th; went into position on Rocky Face Ridge on the 9th; on the 11th had 2 men wounded; on the 13th entered Dalton and marched south; the 14th came up with the enemy at Resaca; was engaged on the 14th and 15th, lost 24 men killed and wounded. On the 17th theregiment was in the advance; we found the enemy near Adairsville intrenched; we engaged them and fought until after dark, when they retreated; we lost 4 killed and 32 wounded. We took part in the operations near Dallas, in which we lost 2 killed and 5 wounded. May 31, our adjutant was mortally wounded and 1 captain severely. In the skirmishing from Dallas to Kenesaw we had 10 men killed and wounded. In the charge on Kenesaw, June 27, we lost: Commissioned officers, 3 wounded; enlisted m
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 45 (search)
we opened a brisk fire again, held our position, and stayed there until 9 p. m., when, by order of Colonel Sherman, we were relieved and went into bivouac. My regiment was that day for six hours under constant fire. On the 15th of May at 8 a. m. my regiment relieved the Twenty-fourth Wisconsin and were under fire for two hours. Were relieved at 10 a. m. by the Twenty-second Illinois Volunteers; took position in the second line of our brigade. Continued our march on the 16th of May. On the 17th Company F was detailed as flankers to cover our left, Companies B and G to cover our right flank; Companies A and C to support the Eighty-eighth, which was deployed as skirmishers and had relieved the Thirty-sixth Illinois; the rest of the regiment was held in reserve either to support the skirmish line or right flank wherever it was required. In this way we moved all day until about 4 o'clock, when I deployed the rest of my regiment as skirmishers on the extreme right of our brigade, conne
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