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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Jackson's Valley campaign of 1862. (search)
ight attack upon Banks. His proposition was not approved, and he learned then for the first time that the troops were already six miles from Winchester and ten from the enemy. The plan was now evidently impracticable, and he withdrew from the town, which was occupied by the Federals on the next day, March 12. The Confederates continued to retreat slowly to Woodstock and Mount Jackson, forty miles in rear of Winchester, and Shields' division was thrown forward in pursuit to Strasburg on the 17th. The retirement of Jackson, and the unopposed occupation of the lower Valley by Banks, relieved General McClellan of all fears in that direction, and induced him, in pursuance of President Lincoln's requirement that Manassas Junction and the approaches to, Washington from that direction be securely held, to send the following instructions to Banks on March 16th: Sir — You will post your command in the vicinity of Manassas, entrench yourself strongly, and throw cavalry pickets out to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Detailed Minutia of soldier life. (search)
ewell to the household and started for the farmer's house. As they were about to start away, the head of the family took from his pocket a handfull of odd silver pieces, and extending it to his guests, told them it was all he had, but they were welcome to half of it! Remembering that he had a wife and three or four children to feed, the soldiers smiled through their teats at his, bade him keep it all and weep for himself rather than for them. So saying, they departed, and at sundown were at the farmer's house, fourteen miles away. Monday morning, the 17th, they beat their swords (muskets in this case) into plow-shares and did the first day's work of the sixty which the simple farmer secured at a cost to himself of about half rations for two men. Behold the gratitude of a people! Where grow now the shrubs which of old bore leaves and twigs for garlands? The brave live! are the fair dead? Shall time or calamity, downfall or ruin annihilate sacrifice or hatch an ingrate brood?
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Missouri campaign of 1864-report of General Stirling Price. (search)
Previous to the attack on Sedalia, the large and magnificent bridge over the Lamine, on the Pacific railroad, had been destroyed by Lieutenant James Wood, of Elliott's battalion, who had been sent there for that purpose by General Shelby. On the 17th I received information that the enemy (Kansas troops) had entered Lexington on the 16th. On the 17th I also received news of the capture of Sedalia by General Thompson. On the 18th, having been joined by Shelby's division and Clark's brigade of 17th I also received news of the capture of Sedalia by General Thompson. On the 18th, having been joined by Shelby's division and Clark's brigade of Marmaduke's division, I marched to Waverly, twenty-two miles. On leaving Pocahontas I had sent an agent of great intelligence and tact into Saint Louis to ascertain the strength of the enemy at that city, with instructions to report to me if possible at Potosi. He was, however, so closely watched that he could not join me until I had passed that city. Upon overtaking me he informed me that I would be pursued by 24,000 men from Saint Louis and 15,000 from Jefferson City, which, with the forc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of operations of General John C. Breckinridge. (search)
ext day General Breckinridge issued an order thanking his brave soldiers, particularly the cadets, who, though mere youths, had. fought with the steadiness of veterans. Immediately following General Lee's congratulatory dispatch came another, directing General Breckinridge to transfer his command as speedily as possible to Hanover Junction. The battle had been fought on the 15th. One day being given the troops for rest, General Breckinridge gave orders for them to march to Staunton on the 17th, he going in advance to make better disposition for their transfer by rail from Staunton to Hanover Junction, a distance of near one hundred miles. The energy and promptness of his movement were such that, notwithstanding the inferior facilities for transportation at that time in the South, his whole command,, including artillery, was at Hanover Junction on the 20th. The Augusta reserves being disbanded, the cadets returned to Lexington and Imboden left to watch the Valley. J. Stoddard John
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Prison experience. (search)
seeing several paragraphs in the papers relative to the exchange of prisoners, which had been broken up at the battle of Gettysburg by the United States officers, who flagrantly violated the terms of the cartel. This was a most interesting subject to us, especially the Gettysburg prisoners, who had been told that they were retained as nest eggs, and that they would have no more fighting to do. On the 3d of March, the First division left for Dixie, and the 10th, the Ninth division, and on the 17th, five companies of the Second division left. We now began to regard an early return to the sunny South with some certainty, and many were the plans laid out for amusement and fun upon our arrival at home. These were all, however, doomed to bitter disappointment, as the next week brought us the news that Butler's plan of swapping man for man would not work. We now began to look forward to the termination of the war as the only end to our captivity. On the 23d and 30th of April, two boat lo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Meeting at the White Sulphur Springs. (search)
the crossings of the Tallahatchie river, while Jeff. Forrest's brigade was at Grenada, watching the forces at Yazoo City, and Bell, at Oxford, organizing. On the 10th Smith started from Collierville. On the 11th McCulloch moved to Oxford on converging lines with him. By the 14th it was manifest that Smith was moving for the prairie, and Forrest ordered a concentration of his command near West Point to intercept him, and this was accomplished by the 18th--Jeff. Forrest reaching there on the 17th. His brigade was thrown forward towards Aberdeen, and continued skirmishing with the enemy until the 20th. On the 20th Bell's brigade was sent to keep on the flank of the enemy and cover Columbus, and McCulloch and Richardson moved up to support Jeff. Forrest, and all fell back, slowly skirmishing to West Point. A telegram received here announced that General S. D. Lee, with three brigades, would be with us early on the 22d, and Forrest retired behind Suqua-ton-cha creek, of steep banks an